Planning to move to Canada, tips? - VeggieBoards

Planning to move to Canada, tips?

retrospective's Avatar retrospective
05:18 AM 11-08-2013

I currently reside in Germany, during these 4 years I have discovered that Europe might be the right place for me. I plan to move in a few years, the process is never really that prompt. So as Canadians, any suggestions what would be the best region/city to start your life in?

 

If it was up to me I would move to BC/Yukon and live with my wolf-hybrids happily ever after, but unfortunately the world does not work that way. My partner has a career in Online-Marketing, and I plan to study Game- Design, so I guess the most emphasis should be on the job market. I am not a city-person anymore, but for the time being I guess I will have to go with it anyway.

 

I am also interested in alternative schools for my (future) kids. Safety is important, I have heard that BC for e.g. has quite a high crime rate and is quite expensive as well. Affordable property (decently sized houses with land, apartments).

 

Just drop your thoughts, anything would be helpful.


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Werewolf Girl's Avatar Werewolf Girl
03:20 PM 11-08-2013
Hi retrospective! I live in Vancouver, BC and it's true it is quite expensive here with a higher crime rate than I'd like but it's important to remember BC is a big place and it varies depending on what region you live in. It's cheaper and quieter in places like Kamloops or Dawson's Creek, much closer to nature too. I've also heard that Prince George is nice. It does get colder the further north you go, so that's important to keep in mind!

It's very warm in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland which is definitely one of the biggest bonuses of living here. Vancouver Island is very pretty and still has that small town feel without all the problems that come with city life, but I don't know how expensive it is there compared to up north. Basically if you want to live in BC you have quite a few options and can pick between living in a busy city or out on the edges of the forest, sorry if that doesn't help narrow it down any. tongue3.gif
retrospective's Avatar retrospective
01:00 AM 11-11-2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Werewolf Girl View Post

Hi retrospective! I live in Vancouver, BC and it's true it is quite expensive here with a higher crime rate than I'd like but it's important to remember BC is a big place and it varies depending on what region you live in. It's cheaper and quieter in places like Kamloops or Dawson's Creek, much closer to nature too. I've also heard that Prince George is nice. It does get colder the further north you go, so that's important to keep in mind!

It's very warm in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland which is definitely one of the biggest bonuses of living here. Vancouver Island is very pretty and still has that small town feel without all the problems that come with city life, but I don't know how expensive it is there compared to up north. Basically if you want to live in BC you have quite a few options and can pick between living in a busy city or out on the edges of the forest, sorry if that doesn't help narrow it down any. tongue3.gif


Well, as I said, if I could just pick a place, I would move to a small town up north, unfortunately it is not possible for my partner works in a field that requires actual presence (meeting with clients, etc.).

 

The cold does not scare me, haha. In fact, it is one of the reasons I would like to move more to the north, the ''nordic'' climate and scenery. Anything that is above 21 Celsius in summer usually is killing me and trapping me indoors surrounded by lots of air conditioners. :D


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VeggiGirl's Avatar VeggiGirl
05:07 PM 11-13-2013

Me and my boyfriend recently drove across canada from BC (our home province) to Newfoundland. So I know a bit about each province.

BC is one of the most beautiful provinces but definitely one of the most expensive. The high crime rate is really only in Vancouver. I'm from Kelowna BC and always felt pretty safe there.

Alberta has a lot of good paying jobs (mostly because of the oil there) and has the lowest taxes of any province. The most beautiful part is the Banff/Canmore area in the rocky mountains. The rest of the province is flat farm land.

Saskatchewan and Manitoba are both full of endless fields upon fields and more fields. Farming is the main industry there. I have heard that Regina has lots of jobs there right now and isnt too expensive to live.

Ontario is the most populated area. I would say that most immigrants go there especially around the toronto area. Toronto is the biggest city in Canada so probably has the most opportunities but be prepared for lots of people and traffic jams. 

Quebec is almost entirely french speaking so dont go there unless you speak french. There are english speakers in Montreal and places around the quebec border like Gatineau.

The maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and PEI) are really pretty with nice scenery but I;m not sure how much work there would be there. It's canadas least populated area with lots of small fishing villages. Halifax is a big city but I've never been there.

Newfoundland is really beautiful and the people are by far the most friendly I've ever met. There arent a lot of jobs though which is why a lot of newffies leave and the prices are expensive like BC. The taxes are high too but if you can find a job there definitely take it because its a really nice place with nice people.


WilliamGreen's Avatar WilliamGreen
10:13 AM 11-24-2013

Watch out for the prairies in the winter.

 

B.c. is quite nice :)


retrospective's Avatar retrospective
05:11 AM 12-02-2013

Thanks all for your replies!

 

Unfortunately it seems that at this point Canada is out of the question, the more I research on your Visas and immigration laws the more it seems impossible for us to actually get there. My impression is that Canadians value Canadian work experience and education more than anything else, hence my partner might be a manager/director here, however in Canada he would have to start his career all over again. Also, what's with the spouse visa? Apparently I can not just tag along, for those are issued only to the spouses of Canadian citizens and spouses of permanent residents. :/


LeeLou707's Avatar LeeLou707
10:17 AM 12-15-2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by retrospective View Post
 

Thanks all for your replies!

 

Unfortunately it seems that at this point Canada is out of the question, the more I research on your Visas and immigration laws the more it seems impossible for us to actually get there. My impression is that Canadians value Canadian work experience and education more than anything else, hence my partner might be a manager/director here, however in Canada he would have to start his career all over again. Also, what's with the spouse visa? Apparently I can not just tag along, for those are issued only to the spouses of Canadian citizens and spouses of permanent residents. :/

 

Once he's here you could likely come into Canada and extend your stay through Immigration Canada. There are a few different entrance programs that you guys might fit under depending but you should be able to find something here http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/eligibility.asp 

 

Quote:

Well, as I said, if I could just pick a place, I would move to a small town up north, unfortunately it is not possible for my partner works in a field that requires actual presence (meeting with clients, etc.).

 

The cold does not scare me, haha. In fact, it is one of the reasons I would like to move more to the north, the ''nordic'' climate and scenery. Anything that is above 21 Celsius in summer usually is killing me and trapping me indoors surrounded by lots of air conditioners. :D

 

You might actually hate YT (Yukon Territory) then, during the summer you get alot of sunlight and so a definite warming effect takes place. It was pretty durn hot when I lived there but it was a dry heat so much more manageable than a humid type of heat. Flip side, of course, is little sunlight during the winter.

 

BC is more moderate than other areas of Canada as far as winters. Beautiful mountain ranges, beautiful forests. 

 

Northern Ontario might be a good option as well depending on what you can find for jobs. Places like Timmins can offer some decent job opportunities while being decently far north and in more 'wild' country. Technology centered jobs tend to be more in urban centers like Toronto and Vancouver though. Healthcare is an amazing job sector to be in for outpost living. 


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