Unwanted pet parrots are reaching crisis levels, and resources for rescues are almost non-existent - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 08-18-2013, 12:23 PM
Super Moderator
 
Werewolf Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 16,664
Quote:
Foster Parrots was established approximately 18 years ago by Founder and CEO, Marc Johnson, and was formally incorporated as a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization in 1999. Since our incorporation 9 years ago we have provided rescue and adoption services to over a thousand birds throughout New England. We now turn away nearly 1500 surrender requests each year. Foster Parrots is only one parrot rescue organization out of hundreds in operation across the country, and we are only one of the hundreds of parrot rescue organizations across the country that are full to capacity and fielding surrender requests far beyond what can possibly be handled.
Actual bird numbers in America are difficult to establish. In the U.S. Pet Ownership Demographic Sourcebook published in 2002 by the AVMA reported 10 million pet birds in American homes in 2001. The American Pet Products Manufacturers Association (APPMA) indicated 17.3 million birds in 6.7 million households in a 2003/2004 profile. In a 1996 Pet Industry Joint Advisory Committee (PIJAC) survey that included breeder information, however, the number of captive birds in the U.S. was established at 40 million. That’s a pretty wide spread. Suffice it to say, America’s third most popular pet is an exotic wild animal whose life span can range between 25 and 80 years or more, depending on the species, and whose complex care requirements over the long term exceed the abilities of the average pet consumer. Unofficial statistics indicate that parrots are amongst the most often re-homed and relinquished of all companion animals with many larger parrots seeing 3 or more homes before reaching the age of 10.
“Hello Karen, I have a 15-year old Moluccan cockatoo who needs a good home. I took him in 18 months ago from a woman who had raised him but no longer had time for him. Somewhere along the way Bugsy developed a screaming problem and a deep hatred of men…”

Read the rest: http://gator3231.hostgator.com/~eli02116/articles/parrots-are-the-new-dog/

This was a very disturbing and sad read, and since there's almost no public awareness about this issue I felt it was important to share.

Knowing how smart parrots are and how long their lifespans are and how they can be difficult to deal with it makes sense that this would become a crisis. Especially if you consider that people breed any animal for profit that they can make money off of and so of course parrots are still being bred and sold in large numbers even as many more have nowhere to go and need to be adopted.

Please share this and if you can consider adopting a parrot in need or donating to a bird sanctuary that badly needs funding.

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we?" - Edgars Mission
Werewolf Girl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 08-18-2013, 01:33 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Pixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 5,658

That is really terrible. sad.gif Humans can be irresponsible idiots. My father bought a parrot to live in his London flat as he thought it was "cool" but then he got rid of the poor thing when it became too much trouble.
 

Pixie is offline  
#3 Old 08-18-2013, 01:38 PM
Not such a Beginner ;)
 
LedBoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,396
It has always creeped me out that people want to keep birds in a cage, not able to fly. And now I find that they abandon them, too.
LedBoots is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 08-18-2013, 01:49 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Aristede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Beijing, China
Posts: 3,897

This sort of thing really saddens me. It's bad enough that owners refuse to spay or neuter their cats and dogs, which leads to so many unwanted and neglected animals. However, there are some resources out there to help stray dogs and cats (though they are overwhelmed). 

 

I agree with LedBoots, in that I don't like seeing birds caged up. I know that there are veg*ns who advocate that we shouldn't have companion animals at all, but from my perspective, at least cats and dogs are given the space that they need to roam. I don't see how caging up birds as pets is remotely kind...

 

Aristedebook2.gif


"Now listen, I know you've got to think about your image, 'cause image is important to you, because of course your friends are gonna dictate your actions through the rest of your lives, and I wouldn't want you to step away from them and become an individual, that would almost be too much!"...

Aristede is offline  
#5 Old 08-18-2013, 01:50 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Irizary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,749

That last paragraph made me sick.

 

There is no hell bad enough for that woman.  People say things like, "I wouldn't wish X on my worst enemy"...well I do wish the worst on people like that, because they richly earned it.  What a POS.

Werewolf Girl likes this.

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

Irizary is offline  
#6 Old 08-18-2013, 01:52 PM
Super Moderator
 
Werewolf Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 16,664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

That last paragraph made me sick.

There is no hell bad enough for that woman.  People say things like, "I wouldn't wish X on my worst enemy"...well I do wish the worst on people like that, because they richly earned it.  What a POS.

I agree, reading that made me feel physically ill. That poor bird, I simply can't understand how an adult can view things with the selfish mentality of a toddler and be so callous. sad.gif

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we?" - Edgars Mission
Werewolf Girl is offline  
#7 Old 08-18-2013, 02:06 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Irizary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,749

She seems proud of her action too.  And to write that to an organization that rescues these animals...what a lousy human being.


"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

Irizary is offline  
#8 Old 08-18-2013, 05:43 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609

I have a confession to make in that I still have two caged birds (society finches) that I had when I was an omnivore several years ago. I used to always have a pair of parakeets and a pair of finches in separate cages that I kept as "pets" though I very much loved them all (though ignorant about the impact of buying animals bred to be pets especially imported and so on).  When I learned about what being vegan meant and opened my eyes to the pet trade, I was sickened by what I was supporting.  When my two parakeets passed away, I stopped "replacing" them and decided to phase out having pet birds (or any pet unless rescued).  I no longer step foot inside of pet shops.  But I still have my two little society finches.  When they pass on I plan to donate the cages to a rescue organization, not sell them or have them be used for more pets by someone else.  I will not have any more pets.  in the meantime I feel like a hypocrite because I still have these caged birds but I do love them and want them to live out there lives in the best way possible under the circumstances.  Moving them to a "better" home at this point would actually be more stressful for them than taking responsibility and caring for them myself.  I bring them outside when it is warm (in their cages) for several hours and sit with them, and I feed them fresh veggies each day in addition to various seeds natural to them (commercial pet bird seed is full of animal byproducts).  I try to do the best I can with them.  I let them out of their cage under limited circumstances given their tiny size and the dangers they could fall into, and we have a dog also (from the humane society) so it is not wise to let them out when she is around.  I would do everything possible to find them a home before handing them over to strangers if my situation came to that.  I couldn't imagine giving them up because I can't handle them or do not have time for them.  I couldn't do that.  But is there something else I could be doing?  I feel bad about having them in a cage but there isn't room for an aviary here and I do not have the money to put one together even if there was.  I do the best I can for them but I do feel guilt (and always in the back of my mind I felt guilt keeping caged birds though I spent a lot of time with them and they have all lived long lives, 7+ years as they were all small birds). 

 

Also, if a person fostered a parrot, wouldn't they have to keep it in a confined area also?  I have to wonder what the requirements are for fostering a bird.  Surely they have to meet certain requirements so that the bird does not fall into the same situation again.  I would think handing a bird to a foster person would not be something to take lightly.  The person would have to be able to provide them with decent food, a clean and roomy home, be flexible as far as the time they could spend with the bird, have the income to bring the bird to the vet as needed, etc.  I remember once I had to bring a finch to the vet because she developed a bald spot on her head and I was worried for her.  After much research and calling around I found the one and only vet in a two hundred mile radius that works with birds.  I was able to get her in and they took stool samples but because the bird was so small they would not draw blood.  Turned out she was fine, but I hadn't expected to run into the problem of finding a vet that handles birds.  There is a lot to consider when caring for a bird.  I would hope there is a screening process which I am sure there must be. 


In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#9 Old 08-18-2013, 05:56 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Irizary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,749
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post

When they pass on I plan to donate the cages to a rescue organization, not sell them or have them be used for more pets by someone else.  I will not have any more pets. 

 

Actually, it would be even better if you fostered or rescued birds yourself with those cages.  Rescue organizations are made up of individuals who care, and there aren't enough of them.  Most animals are turned away and long-waitlisted from sanctuaries and rescues, because there are so many animals who need rescuing.


"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

Irizary is offline  
#10 Old 08-18-2013, 07:20 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 738

I wish I could get them sent over here (Thailand) where they could be outside and living in a colony of birds (they are social creatures after all)

Houndulation is offline  
#11 Old 08-18-2013, 08:41 PM
Veggie Regular
 
ElaineV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,026
I recently took the "Feathered Friends" your at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary and learned that the average parrot has 3-7 different homes in their lifetime. That's higher than the average for cats and dogs. Made me sad to learn.

They also pointed out that parrots are really wild animals kept in captivity. Even if they come from breeders they haven't genetically changed significantly enough from wild birds to really display "pet" characteristics. So they need to be treated as wild animals in captivity - in other words, expect outbursts of uncooperative behavior. That said, they usually cannot survive in the wild and should never be released.

Anyway, I've always liked birds but never in my adult life have I felt the desire/need to rescue one (as in adopt one, I did recently do a short wild pigeon rehab). Honestly, I just think its probably too much work. Birds, in particular parrots, require a lot from their caregivers.
Tom likes this.
ElaineV is offline  
#12 Old 08-18-2013, 09:47 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282

I live with eleven parrots. Two were rehomed to me, eight I adopted from an avian rescue, and one I bought almost thirty years ago from a five and dime because he was living in such horrible conditions that I didn't have the heart to leave him there. (I wouldn't do that anymore, because of course it just perpetuates the market.)

 

My advice to everyone: Do NOT adopt a parrot until you have fully educated yourself. Taking acre of a parrot is a completely different level of commitment than taking care of a dog, cat or other animal. Their needs are complex, and for many species, it's a lifetime commitment - your lifetime, and beyond, because the likelihood is that any medium to large parrot will outlive you. You are taking on the responsibility for a being with the intelligence and emotional needs of a child and with the destructive capabilities of a chainsaw. They are loud, and messy, and expensive to maintain. All of your future housing decisions will need to be made with them in mind - most parrot species are not suited to apartment, condominium, or townhome living because of the noise they can produce. You will never again be able to use candles, air fresheners, self cleaning ovens, nonstick cookware, most hair dryers, toaster, toaster ovens, coffee makers or anything else that has a nonstick coating (and you will be surprised at how many household items have nonstick coatings), most household cleaners, Febreeze, perfume, etc. You will have to go to extraordinary lengths if you ever want to paint a room in your house, even with the most environmentally friendly paint. The list of things in your house that can kill a parrot is longer than the list of safe items.

 

If you have cats or dogs, you need to be aware that their saliva (and your own) contains bacteria than can be fatal to a bird within 24 hours. So it's not just a matter of making sure the bird isn't bitten or scratched by a cat or dog - the bird can't come into contact with anything that has cat, dog or human saliva on/in it, including cat or dog food, toys, water, food....

 

And yes, they are not domesticated, so you need to educate yourself about their social and emotional needs, and remember that they react like prey animals, and they have hormonal periods. You cannot expect them to adapt to you; you will need to adapt to them. And you will have to realize that if you don't read them well, and sometimes even if you do, you will get bitten. If you're going to take that personally, don't adopt a bird.

 

I travel two hours each way to see my avian vet, and that's not unusual - many people have to travel further. Birds are extraordinarily difficult to diagnose, so vet care tends to be much, much, much more expensive than for a cat or a dog.

 

They will need a never ending supply of toys to keep their intelligent minds occupied, and part of what occupies them is destroying the toys. A toy for a large parrot can cost $50 or more, and may well last less than a day, so you're going to have to spend a lot of time cutting bird safe wood and making some of your own toys.

 

Those are just some of the things that people aren't prepared for.

 

They are also just simply amazing and awe inspiring, and I am humbled by them daily.

Tom, Irizary, beanspud and 1 others like this.
Beautiful Joe is offline  
#13 Old 08-18-2013, 10:14 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post

I have a confession to make in that I still have two caged birds (society finches) that I had when I was an omnivore several years ago. I used to always have a pair of parakeets and a pair of finches in separate cages that I kept as "pets" though I very much loved them all (though ignorant about the impact of buying animals bred to be pets especially imported and so on).  When I learned about what being vegan meant and opened my eyes to the pet trade, I was sickened by what I was supporting.  When my two parakeets passed away, I stopped "replacing" them and decided to phase out having pet birds (or any pet unless rescued).  I no longer step foot inside of pet shops.  But I still have my two little society finches.  When they pass on I plan to donate the cages to a rescue organization, not sell them or have them be used for more pets by someone else.  I will not have any more pets.  in the meantime I feel like a hypocrite because I still have these caged birds but I do love them and want them to live out there lives in the best way possible under the circumstances.  Moving them to a "better" home at this point would actually be more stressful for them than taking responsibility and caring for them myself.  I bring them outside when it is warm (in their cages) for several hours and sit with them, and I feed them fresh veggies each day in addition to various seeds natural to them (commercial pet bird seed is full of animal byproducts).  I try to do the best I can with them.  I let them out of their cage under limited circumstances given their tiny size and the dangers they could fall into, and we have a dog also (from the humane society) so it is not wise to let them out when she is around.  I would do everything possible to find them a home before handing them over to strangers if my situation came to that.  I couldn't imagine giving them up because I can't handle them or do not have time for them.  I couldn't do that.  But is there something else I could be doing?  I feel bad about having them in a cage but there isn't room for an aviary here and I do not have the money to put one together even if there was.  I do the best I can for them but I do feel guilt (and always in the back of my mind I felt guilt keeping caged birds though I spent a lot of time with them and they have all lived long lives, 7+ years as they were all small birds). 

 

Also, if a person fostered a parrot, wouldn't they have to keep it in a confined area also?  I have to wonder what the requirements are for fostering a bird.  Surely they have to meet certain requirements so that the bird does not fall into the same situation again.  I would think handing a bird to a foster person would not be something to take lightly.  The person would have to be able to provide them with decent food, a clean and roomy home, be flexible as far as the time they could spend with the bird, have the income to bring the bird to the vet as needed, etc.  I remember once I had to bring a finch to the vet because she developed a bald spot on her head and I was worried for her.  After much research and calling around I found the one and only vet in a two hundred mile radius that works with birds.  I was able to get her in and they took stool samples but because the bird was so small they would not draw blood.  Turned out she was fine, but I hadn't expected to run into the problem of finding a vet that handles birds.  There is a lot to consider when caring for a bird.  I would hope there is a screening process which I am sure there must be. 

You shouldn't feel like a hypocrite. The best thing for your two birds is to continue to take care of them for the rest of their lives.

 

It's good that you're taking them outside in their cages, weather permitting. They need the sunlight to properly process certain nutrients, notably calcium.

 

The requirements for fostering depend on the rescue that you're working with. A reputable rescue* will have a pretty significant screening process.

 

*Avian rescues often consist of just a few individuals who have gotten together to  help birds. Unfortunately, it's easy to get overwhelmed, because there are so many birds in need of help and so few resources. As a result, the avian community has experienced some real horror stories during the last several years, of some rescues gone bad, with horrific results for the birds. Also, the internet has allowed scam artists to flourish, raking in donations from well meaning people, and pocketing them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

 

Actually, it would be even better if you fostered or rescued birds yourself with those cages.  Rescue organizations are made up of individuals who care, and there aren't enough of them.  Most animals are turned away and long-waitlisted from sanctuaries and rescues, because there are so many animals who need rescuing.

Very true.

 

Naturebound, if you bought your finch cage at a pet store, it's almost certainly not suitable for anything other than a finch, and probably not even a good size for such a tiny bird. Most of the cages sold in pet stores shouldn't even be permitted to be sold - they are just inadequate.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Houndulation View Post

I wish I could get them sent over here (Thailand) where they could be outside and living in a colony of birds (they are social creatures after all)

They need to be in a flock of their own species, or something close to their own species. Flocks will generally not accept different species, and may injure or kill them.

 

That being said, a bird born in captivity, and wild caught birds who have lived in captivity for any length of time, will not be able to survive even if returned to their native habitat where there are flocks of their own species.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineV View Post

I recently took the "Feathered Friends" your at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary and learned that the average parrot has 3-7 different homes in their lifetime. That's higher than the average for cats and dogs. Made me sad to learn.

They also pointed out that parrots are really wild animals kept in captivity. Even if they come from breeders they haven't genetically changed significantly enough from wild birds to really display "pet" characteristics. So they need to be treated as wild animals in captivity - in other words, expect outbursts of uncooperative behavior. That said, they usually cannot survive in the wild and should never be released.

Anyway, I've always liked birds but never in my adult life have I felt the desire/need to rescue one (as in adopt one, I did recently do a short wild pigeon rehab). Honestly, I just think its probably too much work. Birds, in particular parrots, require a lot from their caregivers.

It's generally accepted that the average parrot will have more than seven homes in his lifetime. My Congo African Grey was two when she came to me, and I was already her fourth home. It's not due to any *problem* on her part - she is pretty much the perfect parrot - talkative but not noisy, very affectionate and sweet, incredibly intelligent. I won't be her last home; unless something untoward happens, she will outlive me by many years.

 

My avian vet's oldest patient died a few years ago, at age 113. The founder of the rescue from which I adopted my birds says that they see the larger (expensive to purchase) species being surrendered after ten years in a home, and the smaller ones after two years.

Irizary likes this.
Beautiful Joe is offline  
#14 Old 08-19-2013, 01:50 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 738

Parrots are social animals , Ideally a large aviary like the one at london Zoo would be ideal,

Houndulation is offline  
#15 Old 08-19-2013, 02:35 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post

You shouldn't feel like a hypocrite. The best thing for your two birds is to continue to take care of them for the rest of their lives.

 

It's good that you're taking them outside in their cages, weather permitting. They need the sunlight to properly process certain nutrients, notably calcium.

 

The requirements for fostering depend on the rescue that you're working with. A reputable rescue* will have a pretty significant screening process.

 

*Avian rescues often consist of just a few individuals who have gotten together to  help birds. Unfortunately, it's easy to get overwhelmed, because there are so many birds in need of help and so few resources. As a result, the avian community has experienced some real horror stories during the last several years, of some rescues gone bad, with horrific results for the birds. Also, the internet has allowed scam artists to flourish, raking in donations from well meaning people, and pocketing them.

Very true.

 

Naturebound, if you bought your finch cage at a pet store, it's almost certainly not suitable for anything other than a finch, and probably not even a good size for such a tiny bird. Most of the cages sold in pet stores shouldn't even be permitted to be sold - they are just inadequate.

 

They need to be in a flock of their own species, or something close to their own species. Flocks will generally not accept different species, and may injure or kill them.

 

That being said, a bird born in captivity, and wild caught birds who have lived in captivity for any length of time, will not be able to survive even if returned to their native habitat where there are flocks of their own species.

It's generally accepted that the average parrot will have more than seven homes in his lifetime. My Congo African Grey was two when she came to me, and I was already her fourth home. It's not due to any *problem* on her part - she is pretty much the perfect parrot - talkative but not noisy, very affectionate and sweet, incredibly intelligent. I won't be her last home; unless something untoward happens, she will outlive me by many years.

 

My avian vet's oldest patient died a few years ago, at age 113. The founder of the rescue from which I adopted my birds says that they see the larger (expensive to purchase) species being surrendered after ten years in a home, and the smaller ones after two years.

I'm glad that you illustrated how much work goes into caring for a parrot.  While it is a noble idea to take on a rescued parrot, it is even more important to consider what is involved before making such a commitment.  They need so much more than just another place to live.  Even for my little finch, when I took it to the vet, it cost me almost $100 for the stool test and more for checking out the bird.  They are difficult for vets to treat because of their size and wild nature.

 

Yes, my bird cage is from a pet store.  It's too big for a transport cage, but indeed too small for more than a finch sized bird so maybe I should just have the cages recycled. 


In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#16 Old 08-19-2013, 02:54 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houndulation View Post

Parrots are social animals , Ideally a large aviary like the one at london Zoo would be ideal,

I don't know how large the aviary at the London zoo is, but what you have to understand is that parrots commonly found in captivity range in size from budgies to the large macaws. You really can't put beaks that vary that greatly in size in the same enclosure. You would be risking the lives of Amazons (which are considered to be large parrots) by putting them in the same enclosure as large macaws. You really would need species specific enclosures to prevent large numbers of deaths. (And even then, it's risky - I just saw a photo of a blue and gold macaw who lost his upper beak in an attack by a greenwing macaw. His mate was killed in the same attack. Many macaw species don't normally live in flocks.)

 

Also, not all parrots flock - many species live in couples and protect their territories from others of the same species.

 

Additionally, many of the parrots now in captivity were hand reared. This means that they were pulled from the nest either prior to hatching or immediately afterwards. Many of these birds are exclusively human oriented and have no interest in other birds. (Birds form attachments differently than cats and dogs.) One of my macaws, for example is exclusively human-oriented, has no interest in other birds, and sees me as his mate. If he outlives me, he will choose another human as his mate, just as he did before I adopted him. He, and other birds like him, would be miserable in an aviary setting. Humans crippled him from ever forming an attachment to another bird. He sees himself as human, not as a bird.

 

Don't misunderstand me - I wish that humans had never formed the idea of holding birds captive. I wish breeding would stop immediately. I wish that people would stop catching wild parrots and smuggling them and selling them. You have no idea how desperately I wish that. However, even if all that were to occur, there's no easy answer to the birds currently in captivity - there are simply too many of them, with greatly varying individual needs, to simply say "We'll build enormous aviaries to house them", even if the resources could be found to build those aviaries and guarantee the maintenance of those birds for the next hundred years or so.

Beautiful Joe is offline  
#17 Old 08-19-2013, 02:58 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post

 

Yes, my bird cage is from a pet store.  It's too big for a transport cage, but indeed too small for more than a finch sized bird so maybe I should just have the cages recycled. 

Yes, that's probably the best thing to do. I've purchased cages at garage sales just so that I could destroy them. Round cages are especially bad for birds - they do something to their sense of space, and can quite quickly drive a bird neurotic. They should not be produced at all, regardless of size.

Beautiful Joe is offline  
#18 Old 08-19-2013, 08:54 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 738

Its such a terrible issue.

Houndulation is offline  
#19 Old 08-19-2013, 12:19 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houndulation View Post

Its such a terrible issue.

Yes, it's heartbreaking.

Beautiful Joe is offline  
#20 Old 08-19-2013, 06:01 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Irizary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,749
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post

I wish that humans had never formed the idea of holding birds captive. I wish breeding would stop immediately. I wish that people would stop catching wild parrots and smuggling them and selling them. 

 

It reminds me of the quote

 

Quote:

God loved the birds and invented trees.  Man loved the birds and invented cages.  ~Jacques Deval, Afin de vivre bel et bien

 

It's really unconscionable.


"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

Irizary is offline  
#21 Old 08-19-2013, 06:37 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

 

It reminds me of the quote

 

 

It's really unconscionable.

Yes, it is.

 

I often wonder at what kind of creatures we are, that we can see something beautiful and free, and think, "I want to put that in a cage."

Beautiful Joe is offline  
#22 Old 08-19-2013, 07:01 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Aristede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Beijing, China
Posts: 3,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post

Yes, it is.

 

I often wonder at what kind of creatures we are, that we can see something beautiful and free, and think, "I want to put that in a cage."

 

I think it goes back to man's idea that he has authority over all animals (a biblical concept warped out of proportion, I'd say). I aver that having "authority" over animals implies proper stewardship as well, but it ain't necessarily so. 

 

Aristedebook2.gif


"Now listen, I know you've got to think about your image, 'cause image is important to you, because of course your friends are gonna dictate your actions through the rest of your lives, and I wouldn't want you to step away from them and become an individual, that would almost be too much!"...

Aristede is offline  
#23 Old 08-19-2013, 09:38 PM
Veggie Regular
 
zirpkatze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,408
i need a password to read that
zirpkatze is offline  
#24 Old 08-19-2013, 10:58 PM
 
veganality's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 70

A lot of parrots live freely in the city where I am at. They are loud and distinct I always know when they are around.

veganality is offline  
#25 Old 08-20-2013, 12:06 AM
 
mangolover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 119
On a happier note I'm so glad my conure Sherlock ended up with me and not someone else the only time he is in his cage is when he sleeps or if me and my dad take a walk or go out to eat.I do my best to make sure he is always happy.smiley.gif
mangolover is offline  
#26 Old 02-03-2014, 09:49 AM
 
faeryphoebe1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 36


This is Sunny. He was a captive born, hand raised baby who is now 1. We take him everywhere: stores, parks, malls...wherever my kids and I go. He's wearing his aviator harness in this pic.

Now that it's winter, we haven't been able to take him outdoors as much.

Sunny and his arch-nemesis Trixie(pic)

spend several hours a day, out of their very large cages (large enough for an African Grey). They are fully flighted and fly around our living room to exercise, play and wreak birdy havoc (always under supervision, of course).

Their food costs more than mine. They get organic pellets, fresh fruits and veggies daily. I even bake nutritious birdy bread for them. We got rid of all teflon, perfumes, aerosols, commercial cleaning products and candles. No nail polish or nail polish remover is used in the house.

We adore them. They are loud, messy, expensive and will bite if they get upset. If a parrot bites you, it's always the human's fault, not the bird's. No ER trips for us yet, lol.

My parrots cannot ever be released into the wild. They would be killed by a predator, starve or succumb to exposure.

I wish that I could say, "Yeah, I regret getting them", but it would be lie. I love them. They are family. They are so incredibly intuitive and intelligent. They know when I'm sad or sick. They will fly over, land on my shoulder, cuddle into my cheek and whisper "birdy" language in a gravelly voice.

I hope to one day provide a home for a rescued parrot. However, we can't afford another parrot right now. The nearest parrot rescue is a 6 hour drive from us and requires applicants for adoption to do several months of volunteer work at the rescue. Don't think that will ever happen. It will need to be Craig's List type of rescue/adoption for us to be able to pull it off.

If you ever get a chance to see their videos, Sunny and Trixie are on YouTube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3-F_xV_3-I

I just wanted you to know that there are people out there who do love their birds. However, there definitely aren't enough of us.
faeryphoebe1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off