Why meat at expensive and fast-food restaurants and vegs at mid-priced restaurants? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 10-31-2007, 06:49 PM
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I'm wondering -- why do you think it is that cheap fast food restaurants and expensive classy restaurants seem to focus primarily on serving meat, while it's easiest to eat vegetarian at mid-priced restaurants?



For fast food, there are generally burgers, chicken salads, etc. For high end restaurants, you'll find entrees of lobster, lamb chops, beef filets, salmon, etc. Neither are really conducive to eating as a veg*an.



On the other hand, mid-priced restaurants are generally much friendlier toward "our kind," usually with options straight off the menu that are vegetarian, and occassionally some that are vegan, and usually something that can be turned vegan with a request and not too much extra effort, and without as much of a "you should have called us in advance to tell us about your weirdo diet" attitude that expensive places often seem to have. (Of course, it is a good idea to call in advance, when possible, but sometimes circumstances prevent it.)



I'm wondering why this is. Why does meat prevail so much at the highest and lowest ends of restaurants, but lose its dominance in the middle range?
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#2 Old 10-31-2007, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idhan View Post

I'm wondering why this is.



Supply and demand.
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#3 Old 10-31-2007, 08:59 PM
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Lol... you read my mind bigdufstuff...



However, I need to add something to that...



I'm also with Idhan...



A good wine business for example, you may find weird bottles... bottles that are never sold... or almost never... just one "weird" customer purchases it... But when X-Mas comes... the same man purchases several more wine and champagne... in that wine store...



With this I mean, the wine store can do a big sale, thanks to the customer... as without the weird bottle, it's very probably that customer wouldn't purchase wines in x-mas in that liquor store...



The same with this...



A vegan can go to an expensive restaurant, and eat vegan. On a day that the vegan guy/gal has a business lunch, the vegan can bring new customers to that restaurant...



Like Cruel-Donald's... if from the beginning of their existence they had vegan options (without the trans fats on those)... for sure there would be vegans in these places...



Well... I would probably give a better explanation about this... as I'm good at business strategies... but I'm tired and I feel lazy... so better I go to bed
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#4 Old 10-31-2007, 09:21 PM
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The question I want answered is why does it cost the same price to veganize a dish that is loaded with animals and secretions? ft: It really isn't cool that I'll get a salad minus the chicken, cheeses etc. and it will still cost $12.95 Not cool at all. Most places don't even have something vegan they will sub, like chickpeas, nuts, seeds, kalamata olives, you know, the GOOD stuff!

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#5 Old 10-31-2007, 09:26 PM
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My favorite is when they charge me extra to add vegetables after I took away all the meat and cheese.



I once ordered a dry baked potato w/ broccoli and mushrooms on it (to go with my $5 dry, iceberg only salad). We got the bill and it cost $14 because they had charged me for a "loaded" baked potato (sour cream, real bacon, 2 kinds of cheese, butter) and for a full side of each vegetable. I actually got maybe 1 mushroom total and 3 small bits of broccoli. I LOVE eating at nice restaurants!
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#6 Old 10-31-2007, 10:04 PM
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I saw this on a cooking show. They said the presence of meat in a dish allows restaurants to charge more and make a greater profit. A $6 pasta plate can be sold for $16 if it has a dollars worth of chicken on top.

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#7 Old 10-31-2007, 10:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *AHIMSA* View Post

The question I want answered is why does it cost the same price to veganize a dish that is loaded with animals and secretions? ft: It really isn't cool that I'll get a salad minus the chicken, cheeses etc. and it will still cost $12.95 Not cool at all. Most places don't even have something vegan they will sub, like chickpeas, nuts, seeds, kalamata olives, you know, the GOOD stuff!



that reminds me of when my spouse and i got lunch at a sub place recently. i ordered the veggie sub with no cheese (it was supposed to come with two kinds). so i ended up with a bun with lettuce, tomato, olives and guacamole and it cost $5!



i could have ordered one of their three meaty subs that were on special for $4
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#8 Old 11-01-2007, 07:23 AM
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I HATE paying for food I didn't even get! See... I think restaurant owners KNOW vegetarians are around, they just don't want to add anything to the menu for them because they know we'll pay $10 for the salad, even though the place gets to keep the chicken (and sometimes cheese/croutons). So they make a $9.80 profit.



I completely agree about the sub thing... I've been to places where the meat subs are on sale for $1-2 LESS than the veggie. Next time I see that, I'm just going to order the meat sub and tell them "no meat."



When I worked at a restaurant, I substituted meat products for veggies at no extra charge if I could. Some restaurants have strict rules about that, but ours didn't really. If they said no bacon, sub avocado, I could because they were the same price. Some people tried to get more... like "no tomato on their burger, sub avocado." Then they'd get mad when I told them they'd have to pay the upcharge. Tomato is free, avocado is not. This lady used to get mad that we wouldn't substitute free grilled onions for avocado. She tried to get it with every waitress too.
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#9 Old 11-01-2007, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *AHIMSA* View Post

The question I want answered is why does it cost the same price to veganize a dish that is loaded with animals and secretions? ft: It really isn't cool that I'll get a salad minus the chicken, cheeses etc. and it will still cost $12.95 Not cool at all. Most places don't even have something vegan they will sub, like chickpeas, nuts, seeds, kalamata olives, you know, the GOOD stuff!



Quote:
Originally Posted by thebelovedtree View Post

My favorite is when they charge me extra to add vegetables after I took away all the meat and cheese.



I once ordered a dry baked potato w/ broccoli and mushrooms on it (to go with my $5 dry, iceberg only salad). We got the bill and it cost $14 because they had charged me for a "loaded" baked potato (sour cream, real bacon, 2 kinds of cheese, butter) and for a full side of each vegetable. I actually got maybe 1 mushroom total and 3 small bits of broccoli. I LOVE eating at nice restaurants!



It is irritating! In my (totally not realistic) world, there would be a base price for a dish w/o meat and then the option to add it for more money. There could even be a choice of what meat (chicken/beef/whatever else) and the price could vary on that level too.



But dammit....an iceberg lettuce salad with a few pieces of pinky-orange tomato and a little vinaigrette on it isn't worth $10!!!!
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#10 Old 11-01-2007, 08:05 AM
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Houston has nine restaurants per square inch. Some of them, like Mamacita's, offer a lot of vegetarian meals from the range of $7 to $11. I now do my best to avoid places which offer no specific vegetarian meals.
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#11 Old 11-01-2007, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Soy 6-Pack View Post

Houston has nine restaurants per square inch. Some of them, like Mamacita's, offer a lot of vegetarian meals from the range of $7 to $11. I now do my best to avoid places which offer no specific vegetarian meals.



How are the local eateries at adapting to vegan?

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#12 Old 11-01-2007, 09:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Brandon View Post

In my (totally not realistic) world, there would be a base price for a dish w/o meat and then the option to add it for more money. There could even be a choice of what meat (chicken/beef/whatever else) and the price could vary on that level too.




One of the things I love about my local Thai restaurant is that they do this. They have the base price of the dish, as well as differing prices for adding meat, seafood, even extra veggies. I only wish all restaurants did this.

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#13 Old 11-01-2007, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Brandon View Post

It is irritating! In my (totally not realistic) world, there would be a base price for a dish w/o meat and then the option to add it for more money. There could even be a choice of what meat (chicken/beef/whatever else) and the price could vary on that level too.




Some restaurants do that and it's an excellent idea. I think most places don't because they're afraid they'll lose a profit. Some people don't want to spend $2 to add chicken, but they probably would have ordered the dish if it was already $2 more with chicken included.



Definately an amazing idea though. Market Broiler does that with their pastas and 2 salads when I worked at Ruby's did that. 1 salad was soooo good. Apple Pecan bleu cheese with pomegranate vinegarette dressing, yum. The other was a "burger" salad where you had a choice of the veggie patty. At least there were options.
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#14 Old 11-01-2007, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *AHIMSA* View Post

How are the local eateries at adapting to vegan?



Dunno, I have only been vege in Houston for a few weeks now. I have not tried to get meals veganized yet. The first thing I do at a restaurant is order "plain water, with no ice please." If they can't get that right (1/3rd of the time it comes out with ice in it) I make sure to enunciate my words really well and talk really slowly to the wait staff. Adding special vegan requirements will be an interesting challenge! Maybe I will start a page of experiences online somewhere.
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#15 Old 11-01-2007, 11:27 AM
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I'll have to go with the supply and demand thing here too. But is it supply in demand on the consumer part or the company part thinking the consumer wants it? How much longer does it really take to fix a salad as opposed to a burger. The Mcds up the street is really good about fixing me the asian salad without the chicken from start, not picking the chicken off, and adding more lettuce, etc and charging me $1.50 less than with the chicken.
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#16 Old 11-02-2007, 10:23 AM
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I suspect (but don't have any proof) that the reason the supply of meat is available at relatively cheap prices is due to government subsidies and programs that encourage and promote meat production. Also I think some of the costs of meat production such as waste disposal are hidden or reduced by being factored into the general waste disposal costs we all share "equally."



If anyone knows of any good studies or papers that reveal the hidden costs of meat production, I'd be interested in getting links to them.
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