Boiling vegetables in soups destroys nutritients? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-13-2006, 05:34 AM
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Hi guys. I like soups and i'm wondering if I include vegetables in does that destroy their vitamins or do the vitamins get soluted into the water so i still consume them when eating the soup? I hope you understand what i'm saying.
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#2 Old 04-13-2006, 06:05 AM
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Cooking in general can lower the nutrient value of most foods there are exceptions to the rules though.

Tomato's for instance the longe ryou cook the more they release lycopen (sp?)

However I would not worry much about it just because the nutrient value is lowered does not mean it is no longer good for you.
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#3 Old 04-13-2006, 07:12 AM
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Nutritionists disagree. Some believe that cooking can actually release nutrients that MIGHT be unusable if they were eaten raw (this is not a slap at raw foodists-I do prefer most of my veggies raw). OVERCOOKING will destroy nutrients, but it is not clear that boiling will destroy all the nutrition.
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#4 Old 04-13-2006, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by healthnut32 View Post

Nutritionists disagree. Some believe that cooking can actually release nutrients that MIGHT be unusable if they were eaten raw (this is not a slap at raw foodists-I do prefer most of my veggies raw). OVERCOOKING will destroy nutrients, but it is not clear that boiling will destroy all the nutrition.



I heard that too, so I researched it. Some articles that say tomatoes are more nutritious after they're lightly cooked. Also soybeans, in their raw form, possess a non-digestible enzyme that acts as an appetite suppressant. But aside from those 2 cases, I haven't heard of any other foods that are nutritionally enhanced by cooking. If you know any, please let me know!



Science tells us that vitamin C is a fragile molecule that is easily destroyed at high temperatures. I'm pretty sure if you boil an orange it'll be worthless. But I'm not a scientist, so I can't give you the details on that. Gaya (our resident expert molecular scientist) would prolly know.



I'm not a 100% raw foodist, but I do notice that the raw foods make me feel better. The only foods that I prefer cooked are eggplant, soybeans and rice. Maybe that's the best way to determine how much to cook your food--just listen to your body.
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#5 Old 04-13-2006, 10:48 AM
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most dark leafy greens are healthier cooked, aren't they? I heard when they are raw the iron in them is not digestible...



course I am not even close to 100% raw so I am definitely not an authority.
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#6 Old 04-13-2006, 10:58 AM
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I would think it wouldn't affect it too much, since the vitamins that would leak out would just be leaking into the soup you're eating anyway. I think the only thing that may be lower is the fiber content.
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#7 Old 04-13-2006, 11:34 AM
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The fiber content shouldn't be changed, even though it would seem so - the fiber is still there, just 'pre-digested' by the cooking process. If cooking destroyed (even partially) fiber then breads and oatmeal wouldn't be effective as fiber sources.



As for nutrients in soups, I say, add away! There should be enough nutrition left in the vegetables (and soup liquid) to keep you reasonably healthy even if some are destroyed in the cooking process. It is still much better than a Big Muk.
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#8 Old 04-13-2006, 04:55 PM
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[QUOTE=bluegrrrl79]I would think it wouldn't affect it too much, since the vitamins that would leak out would just be leaking into the soup you're eating anyway. QUOTE]



This is what I was thinking.
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#9 Old 04-13-2006, 10:16 PM
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I studied biology in college, and I can recall what heat does to protein molecules. So, if you're concerned about getting enough protein/enzymes in your diet, you should read this...



Heat causes proteins to denature - this is one reason why cooking food destroys bacteria, the bacterial proteins are denatured by the high temperature. When a protein is denatured it looses its biological activity - for example, an enzyme would no longer catalyze its reaction, insulin would no longer be able to interact with the appropriate molecule to mediate glucose metabolism. Some small proteins can regain their active-conformation if cooled ( or the salt removed, etc) others can't and are effectively permanently disabled.



So, I would suggest cooking (or boiling) as little as possible if you want to retain the proteins in your foods. The more you heat food, the more nutrients will be lost. I think the best rule of thumb is to try to balance some raw foods with your cooked foods, and don't heat your foods for too long or at too high a temperature if you must cook them.
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#10 Old 04-13-2006, 10:46 PM
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Judging from my own body, protein destruction in food does not seem to be a big problem.
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#11 Old 04-14-2006, 04:29 AM
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rawgirl will know- ask her
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#12 Old 04-14-2006, 06:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashlan View Post

The fiber content shouldn't be changed, even though it would seem so - the fiber is still there, just 'pre-digested' by the cooking process. If cooking destroyed (even partially) fiber then breads and oatmeal wouldn't be effective as fiber sources.



As for nutrients in soups, I say, add away! There should be enough nutrition left in the vegetables (and soup liquid) to keep you reasonably healthy even if some are destroyed in the cooking process. It is still much better than a Big Muk.

Yeah, the insoluble fiber decreases, the soluble stays intact. I have no idea if cooking bread lowers the fiber, I just know cooking veggies lowers it (trust me I know, I have to be careful of my fiber intake!)
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