Need to start eating animal products - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 11-25-2004, 11:59 AM
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This might seem kind of strange but soon enough i'm gonna have to start eating some animal products, because i'm going to Ukraine after Christmas and down there everyone is a hardcore meat-eater (so me not eating meat will freak them out enough). They also add butter/sour cream/cheese/milk/eggs EVERYWHERE and of course i won't be able to find any mock meats there, lets not even mention soy milk (eh i guess i just mentioned it huh ? lol ) ..... So i have decided that i'll be lacto-ovo while i'm staying there, but the problem is that i don't think my belly will like it too much if i make a sudden change - from no animal products to a lot of fatty stuff packed with lactose. Starting slowly would be a good idea, but i don't know what i should start with and when. I know some of you have went from vegan to lacto-ovo and back so maybe you can give me some suggestions.

I'm not very happy about this either, but i really don't wanna be eating pickles 3 times a day either .......
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#2 Old 11-25-2004, 12:10 PM
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Yes, I agree that this could be an issue for your tummy. Zoebird has transitioned, she's in tha know 'bout this...



PM me if you would like some ideas on how to stay vegan while away.
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#3 Old 11-25-2004, 12:10 PM
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Do they sell vegetables and fruit there? Do they sell whole grains like oats, brown and wild rices, wheat pasta? Do they sell processed pastas and white rice? Do they sell legumes/beans there? Do they sell nuts and seeds and nut butters? Do they sell bread? If they do, then it would be very easy to be vegan there. Also, asceptic soymilks have a very long shelf life. I'd buy a bunch here and take them with me, although plant milk isn't necessary. I'd also bring some vegan vitamins to supplement the b-12 you may end up lacking there. Are you going to live there for good?
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#4 Old 11-25-2004, 12:22 PM
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Ok..but i just wanna warn you most (if not all) sour cream isnt even vegetarian!!



(gelatin)
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#5 Old 11-25-2004, 12:29 PM
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Are you staying with family there? Would it be possible to tell them that you've developed an allergy to eggs and milk? I think that would be partly true because you'll probably have some reactions to introducing animal products back into your diet.
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#6 Old 11-25-2004, 12:33 PM
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I agree with the aseptic soymilks, although I don't know the regulations of bringing food into foreign countries. I also don't know much about Ukrainian cuisine, but from what I know about most Eastern European food is that it's not too big on brown rice (I don't think most people have even heard of brown rice in most parts of soem countries), foreign grains, and or beans.

Vicky, I would start with incorporating as little pure lacto-ove food as possible. Mix a little real milk in your your soy milk and cereal. Eat stuff with milkfat as the last ingredient. Add a little butter to your pasta or rice. You'll probably have an upset stomach for a few days, but just keep the pepto bismol handy . After you adjust, I still wouldn't suggest chugging a glass of milk, but you could eat stuff like mashed potatoes and corn bread and regular cookies Good luck!!
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#7 Old 11-25-2004, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by FalafelsRule View Post

Do they sell vegetables and fruit there? Do they sell whole grains like oats, brown and wild rices, wheat pasta? Do they sell processed pastas and white rice? Do they sell legumes/beans there? Do they sell nuts and seeds and nut butters? Do they sell bread? If they do, then it would be very easy to be vegan there. Also, asceptic soymilks have a very long shelf life. I'd buy a bunch here and take them with me, although plant milk isn't necessary. I'd also bring some vegan vitamins to supplement the b-12 you may end up lacking there. Are you going to live there for good?

fruit and veggies yes, not all of them but quite a few.

oats are gross, they just sell regular white rice and some dry pasta stuff, they have a lot of grains down there like buckwheat and other weird stuff that other cultures don't really accept, so i won't be having problems with that. beans - yes..... i'm not really into beans (i'm kind of picky when it comes to food). Their breads probably have animal products in them, but it might be difficult to find out because most breads don't have an ingredient list on the package (they aren't packaged at all actually). taking soymilk with me is a GREAT idea, thanks that didn't even cross my mind. and the place where i'm gonna be staying MIGHT have a little stove and maybe some pot, or it might not ... it's gonna be like a summer camp type of place that is not used in the winter, so i don't know if i'll be able to cook for myself.

And i'll definetly bring vitamins, thanks for your suggestions, you made me really think about it
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#8 Old 11-25-2004, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Foxy View Post

Yes, I agree that this could be an issue for your tummy. Zoebird has transitioned, she's in tha know 'bout this...



PM me if you would like some ideas on how to stay vegan while away.

Thanks, another problem with being vegan there - i don't know how they would take it. I really don't know i'll try but if it gets too difficult i might give up on it and just eat whatever until i get back. FalafelsRule gave me some pretty good ideas, but i'll PM you if i need more, thanks
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#9 Old 11-25-2004, 01:01 PM
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Powdered soymilk/rice milk is even better than the liquid kind for traveling. Nutritional yeast and sesame seeds are great to have along, you can bring or buy nuts and make nut milks and other great things, there's lots you can do if you wanna stay Vegan! How long will you be there?
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#10 Old 11-25-2004, 01:02 PM
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fafel rules has a made some wonderful suggestions but its going to be difficult as although i have never been to Ulkraine if you go to some parts of the world people would see your not eating meat as you not being able to afford it and therefore you may get offered it as a gift, i know that sounds wierd but its true.



Try not to offend anyone, but try to stay clear of meat and diary, not just for the animas but for your poor tummy
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#11 Old 11-25-2004, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Kitten Luv View Post

Ok..but i just wanna warn you most (if not all) sour cream isnt even vegetarian!!



(gelatin)

In that country it definetly is they don't add any preservaties to it - it's just made out of milk, and that's it. But thanks for the warning..... btw around here only some sour creams are not vegetarian, but most of them are.
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#12 Old 11-25-2004, 01:06 PM
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MollyCat, lol no i'll just stay completely honest and say that i try not to eat it



And i'll be staying there for 3 weeks. And there will probably be a lot of parties/family dinners which doesn't really help.
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#13 Old 11-25-2004, 01:31 PM
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Only 3 weeks? That will be easy for you. You mentioned that you don't like beans, but if it came down to beans or cow milk; which is the better choice? I wouldn't worry about offending anyone. If anyone is offended by your compassionate choices, they deserve to see someone eat right and feel offended.
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#14 Old 11-25-2004, 01:40 PM
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Here's a list of light, portable foods that travel well



Dehydrated TVP and "chunks"

Dehydrated Beans/Hummus/Falafel/Chili mixes (Fantastic Foods makes some)

Couscous

Meal Replacement Bars ( like Cliff, Luna and VEGAN bars)

Nutritional Yeast

Powdered "Green Drink" Supplement

Vegan Bouillon

Dried Soymilk/Rice milk powder

Nuts, Seeds and dried fruits, if you can't find them there

Dried rice noodles (asian noodles)



With even just these things, you can use water and fresh veggies and fruits and herbs to make lovely, gourmet Vegan meals that have the nutrients you need and will enjoy
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#15 Old 11-25-2004, 03:02 PM
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Vicky, I spent 3 months in the Ukraine in 1995, and I was vegetarian (except for one cabbage roll, it's a long story) but not vegan. It would be hard to be vegan, if you're eating with other people or in restaurants. Things may have changed a lot, its been almost 10 years, but in 1995 all the restaurants (except one in Kiev) had only one meal, you just ate what they brought you. I ate a lot of pickles, bread, tomatoes.

Eating sour cream made things easier. Most traditional ukranian borscht was vegan, and that helped.



I found that people took my vegetarianism OK, as long as I'd eat something they made and tell them how much I liked it. It is totally different, IMO, to turn down food in a country where food security (ie, hunger and malnutrition) are real issues that people are dealing with. In Canada or the US, I don't worry about people being offended, that's thier problem. But I found it different to turn down food there, where people had way less.



Also, Ukranian sour cream is like, home made or something, it's runnier, it's really different (and delicious, I have to admit). There's no gelatin.



One last thing, your tummy may have problems with or without dairy. Bring Immodium.



And enjoy, I really loved it there.
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#16 Old 11-25-2004, 03:10 PM
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laurajean has some great advice in her post. Above all, the difference in being in an area with less then what we're used to.



And I agree with the Immodium comment - I even carry it when I travel in my own country. A change in water often gives the trots.



I hope the political climate changes before you get there. I wouldn't want you to be unsafe.
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#17 Old 11-25-2004, 03:38 PM
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Vicky, if you do decide to eat any animal products while you are over there, would you have a perogie for me?

( I really miss my grandma's)

http://bringingyouohm.wordpress.com/

Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavanto

'May everyone everywhere be happy
May the whole world be joyous'
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#18 Old 11-25-2004, 04:25 PM
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Take lactaid ( milk digestion enzymes ) with you.



When you can eat fermented dairy products instead ( easier on your system ).



It might not be that bad. I don't know about the Ukraine, but Russia is the home of kasha ( buckwheat ), kidney beans, borscht, cabbage, potatoes etc

My Blog: beforewisdom.com
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#19 Old 11-29-2004, 01:11 AM
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Thanks a lot guys

Laura and Krista, thanks for the support. Laura, my mom makes the vegan version of borsch and it's so damn good that my meateating friends can't tell it's vegan! And yeah, turning down food will be hard, so i don't think i'll be able to stick to veganism. Will definetly try to do very little animal products. I honestly don't know what the hell is going to happen - i haven't been there in 4 years.

There is plenty of immodium there, so that's a good thing and i'm not sure about lactid - i'll probably get some here.

*writes "a perogie for synergy" in her little black book*



eh ..... well wish me luck lol

i shall bring pictures and stuff, maybe someone will let me use their kitchen to cook a kickass vegan meal !
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#20 Old 11-29-2004, 01:48 AM
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Three weeks doesn't seem long. Ovo-Lacto seems like a good compromise. Lactaid and Immodium sound like good necessities. Have fun on the trip! Sounds like a great experience.
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#21 Old 11-29-2004, 07:32 AM
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Have fun, post pictures. I'm a little jealous. : )
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#22 Old 11-29-2004, 09:17 PM
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This would make traveling kind of a problem...



I recommend you stay vegan and stick to your guns. Eat vegetables, whole grains, fruits, whatever you can. It's ridiculous that you would let this throw you off track.
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#23 Old 11-29-2004, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by V422005 View Post

This would make traveling kind of a problem...



I recommend you stay vegan and stick to your guns. Eat vegetables, whole grains, fruits, whatever you can. It's ridiculous that you would let this throw you off track.



In places like the Ukraine where food isn't so easy to come by all the time, it's not ridiculous. Especially in the winter fresh fruit and vegetables are not always easy to find. The markets there are not like they are in much of the western world where the shelves are fully stocked--there you get what you can get which might not be a whole lot (finding only cabbage and potatoes in the produce markets come to mind and bread made with white flour, egg, and dairy in the bakeries). They simply don't have the food distribution system we have here in the US, Canada, and UK. On top of that, the economic hardship in eastern Europe (particularly those countries that used to be a part of the Soviet Union) is no laughing matter. So, being vegan, and even vegetarian, is not always a healthy possibility--this is an issue for many people all over the world. Being veg*n is a good thing if you can be one.



Vicky, being ovo-lacto is a good compromise in this situation. Definitely bring your vitamins and whatever else you can so you can stay healthy while you're there. Definitely have some borscht and pierogies for me (I lurve Russian and Ukranian food) I hope you'll be safe with the current political situation there and that you'll have a good time visiting your family and friends.
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#24 Old 11-29-2004, 11:35 PM
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I haven't read the whole thread, so please excuse me if this has already been said. I would find out from customs what you can and can't bring with you. I traveled to the Philippines years ago, and I know I wasn't able to bring any fruits or veggies. I was allowed to bring pre-packaged foods (snacks) and candy bought from a bulk bin. I can't imagine that it would be any different now, but with all of the new security measures being taken, I would call ahead just to be sure.

When I went from vegan to lacto-ovo the only thing I experienced was acid reflux from overdosing on cheese. Other than that I had no problems...and I was vegan for 2 years prior. If you are concerned with how your body might react, I would just take acodiphilus with your meal, and be sure to get alot of roughage with your meals. Your body will need those enzymes, otherwise you'll end up with alot of acid in your belly like I did. Eden Foods sells acodiphilus in packets that you can take with you...unless you can find Kefir in the Ukraine.

Good Luck!!
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#25 Old 12-04-2004, 11:50 AM
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Ok, I know of course that Ukraine isn't Siberia, but I think the below link illustrates well that it's feasible to be vegan even when living in remote regions of the world:

Healthstudy in a Vegan settlement in Siberia, Russia



I don't really have any good advice or anything that hasn't already been mentioned. But if you're not that much in to cooking yet, this might be a good time to start learning more. So my advice would be to bring a cookery book (preferably one that uses basic ingredients, or ingredients that you think you can find over there).



Anyway, best wishes for the trip! And don't starve yourself - when you gotta eat you gotta eat!



Btw, this seems like an exciting point in time to visit Ukraine!

I no longer post here after VB was sold in 2012. (See my profile page for details.)
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#26 Old 12-06-2004, 04:23 PM
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it is possible to be vegan in many places. there is no reason to eat animal products, and in many places, only the wealthier people even eat that stuff. Many people are vegan throughout the world.



If I had to give up my veganism to go somewhere, I would not go.
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#27 Old 12-06-2004, 04:37 PM
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Vicky,



I think you've come up with a great compromise. It's a lot easier for people to understand lacto-ovo vegetarianism, and to cook meals that you can eat without having to worry about avoiding eggs/dairy. It would be one thing if you were cooking all of your own meals, but since you will probably be eating in peoples' homes much of the time, it seems more gracious to simply avoid the meat and go with whatever else they cook.



As for your body reacting to eggs/dairy...I think it's a great idea to take along some lactaid, tums, that sort of thing. Possibly also some sudafed or other type of nasal decongestant. Maybe trying out some eggs/dairy before you go would be a good idea, just so that you can see how your body reacts and whether these things will be necessary. I was vegan for 6 months and have since gone back to being lacto-ovo. I did notice some nasal stuffiness at first but that has since gone away. Just as long as I don't eat TOO much cheese.



If you want to show your friends how wonderful vegan food can be, you could also offer to cook a meal or two for everybody while you are there. Then you have control over the ingredients.



I hope you have a great trip! Be SAFE! And enjoy...don't feel guilty about having to change your diet for three weeks. It's such a short time and you're doing what you need to do.
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#28 Old 12-07-2004, 12:14 PM
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Goat cheeses would be good to start with. I have a weird reaction to cow's cheese, but goat cheese doesn't bother me at all. I think it has to do with the enzymes being closer in relation to ours. Goat's milk yogurt is pretty good, too. (It's Greek)



Eggs...perhaps an egg salad sandwich once in a while. I would try to eat eggs fully cooked, for sure. Hard boiled, or scrambled dry.



You may be able to avoid meat, but yeah, be prepared to get dairy in almost everything you eat there.



I could add more eggs to my diet, but having to eat more dairy...that's a bummer. Good luck with this whole thing, Vicky.
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#29 Old 12-07-2004, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
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This might seem kind of strange but soon enough i'm gonna have to start eating some animal products, because i'm going to Ukraine after Christmas and down there everyone is a hardcore meat-eater (so me not eating meat will freak them out enough). They also add butter/sour cream/cheese/milk/eggs EVERYWHERE and of course i won't be able to find any mock meats there, lets not even mention soy milk (eh i guess i just mentioned it huh ? lol ) ..... So i have decided that i'll be lacto-ovo while i'm staying there, but the problem is that i don't think my belly will like it too much if i make a sudden change - from no animal products to a lot of fatty stuff packed with lactose. Starting slowly would be a good idea, but i don't know what i should start with and when. I know some of you have went from vegan to lacto-ovo and back so maybe you can give me some suggestions.

I'm not very happy about this either, but i really don't wanna be eating pickles 3 times a day either .......

I know quite a few friends who have made the transition from vegan to lacto-ovo vegetarian and then to include meat products. They mostly did it by adopting 'a bit at a time' strategy. At the meat stage they started on meat products like sausages because they didn't actually look or taste that much like fresh beef or pork. Some of them will only eat chicken which is easily flavoured and more digestible than red meats. Good luck with your transistion.
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