Dental health of vegetarians compared with omnivores - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 01-04-2018, 08:59 PM
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Dental health of vegetarians compared with omnivores

Although there have been several large peer-reviewed studies comparing the bodily health of vegetarians, vegans, and omnivores, there appears to be only one large peer-reviewed study on dental health.

From the May 2013 issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, here is that study: https://www.nature.com/articles/ejcn2013101

In this study, the vegetarian participants had an average of 0.6 more teeth showing erosion, and 0.5 more decayed teeth, compared with the omnivorous participants. The omnivorous participants averaged 0.7 more missing teeth than the vegetarian participants. In other words, there was less than 1-tooth-difference in decay/erosion/missing teeth between the vegetarians and the omnivores: https://www.nature.com/articles/ejcn2013101/tables/3

However, the various paleo websites misrepresented this study, saying that vegetarian diets were bad for your teeth. A shameful bit of misinformation on their part.
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-05-2018 at 01:17 PM.
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#2 Old 01-05-2018, 12:03 PM
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I wonder if the erosion is just from the consumption of more breads. The biting and pulling of breads like tortillas, pitas, rotis, etc can cause additional erosion.
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#3 Old 01-05-2018, 12:16 PM
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Thanks for posting the study.

For vegans and perhaps some vegetarians with low milk consumption low calcium might be a factor and this might be perhaps be more important at a younger age when teeth are developing. So, this could be another reason to watch calcium as a vegan. However, I don't know for sure about the connection between calcium and teeth. It's just something I've seen a number of times in articles that don't quote their sources.
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#4 Old 01-05-2018, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Jamie in Chile View Post
Thanks for posting the study.

For vegans and perhaps some vegetarians with low milk consumption low calcium might be a factor and this might be perhaps be more important at a younger age when teeth are developing. So, this could be another reason to watch calcium as a vegan. However, I don't know for sure about the connection between calcium and teeth. It's just something I've seen a number of times in articles that don't quote their sources.

Unfortunately, this study didn't differentiate between vegetarians and vegans. According to the study, the average difference in tooth erosion was 0.6 of a tooth (less than 1 tooth difference). Very slight.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-05-2018 at 06:46 PM.
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#5 Old 01-05-2018, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by PandaBanana View Post
I wonder if the erosion is just from the consumption of more breads. The biting and pulling of breads like tortillas, pitas, rotis, etc can cause additional erosion.

According to the study, the average difference in eroded/filled/missing teeth, between the vegetarian and omnivorous participants, was less than 1-tooth-difference. The vegetarians in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition published study had an average of 13.22 decayed, filled, and/or missing teeth. The omnivores in the study had an average of 13.51 decayed, filled, and/or missing teeth. The vegetarians had an average of 1.53 missing teeth, and the omnivores had an average of 2.28 missing teeth: https://www.nature.com/articles/ejcn2013101/tables/3. The vegetarians actually did very slightly better overall.
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-05-2018 at 06:46 PM.
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#6 Old 01-05-2018, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by PandaBanana View Post
I wonder if the erosion is just from the consumption of more breads. The biting and pulling of breads like tortillas, pitas, rotis, etc can cause additional erosion.
The American Dental Association lists these foods as potentially damaging to teeth, depending on how frequently you consume them:

1. Hard candy
2. Chewing ice
3. Citrus fruits
4. Coffee and tea (with added sugar)
5. Sticky dried fruits
6. Potato chips
7. Soda
8. Alcohol
9. Sports drinks

Link: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutri...age-your-teeth


The American Dental Association doesn't discourage people from eating healthy whole grain foods, and we shouldn't be afraid to eat them.
.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-05-2018 at 06:44 PM.
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#7 Old 01-06-2018, 12:54 PM
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I'm thinking it might be the fruit. I love citrus- always have- but it's really a good idea to rinse your mouth well with water immediately after consuming the fruit or juice, and avoid brushing your teeth for about an hour. The acid in citrus really can do a number on your teeth, and it temporarily softens the enamel (my dentist told me).
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#8 Old 01-09-2018, 10:03 AM
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That's interesting! I would expect for veg*ns to have better dental health, but it's nice that there's a large, peer-reviewed study on it.
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#9 Old 01-10-2018, 11:45 AM
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My teeth are so bad I would have thrown off the entire statistical average.

I was once told that some of my problems could be a result of my mother getting insufficient calcium while I was being gestated. (She was definitely not a milk drinker though she was able to tolerate some cow dairy products.)
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#10 Old 01-10-2018, 06:58 PM
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Just consuming Calcium either in food or as a supplement isn't enough. You also need plenty of Vitamin D and some Magnesium and heaven knows what else. But D (or sunshine) is the biggie.
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#11 Old 01-13-2018, 02:36 AM
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Originally Posted by MoxNix View Post
Just consuming Calcium either in food or as a supplement isn't enough. You also need plenty of Vitamin D and some Magnesium and heaven knows what else. But D (or sunshine) is the biggie.
I'd like to reiterate that point. Fat-soluble vitamins (including D, A, K2) are required for proper mineralization of bones, teeth and also to prevent calcification of soft tissue.


Vitamin D supplementation may do as much harm as benefit since A and K2 are required in balanced proportions to guard against soft-tissue calcification. Unfortunately, there is not an easy way out of this situation because no one knows for sure what the proper proportions should be and guessing is gambling with risks to osteo on one hand or arteria on the other.

I would post references, but the forum software prohibits me.

Last edited by silva; 01-13-2018 at 11:04 PM. Reason: unsubstantiated claim
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#12 Old 01-13-2018, 10:24 PM
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There was a time when apple pie contained vitamin D by virtue of the lard, but even if lard were still used, the lard is deficient in the vitamin because the pigs see so little sun.

Your claim regarding vitamin D and animal lard doesn't appear to be well-supported. I'm curious as to why you are promoting animal lard on this forum.

Out of curiosity, I've looked at the nutrition labels of several brands of 100% pasture-raised pig and wild boar lard (I assume these animals see plenty of sun). None of these pasture-raised lard's nutrition labels show any vitamin D content whatsoever:

https://www.wisechoicemarket.com/wil...iABEgKwpfD_BwE

https://thrivemarket.com/fatworks-fo...SABEgLM2_D_BwE

https://www.amazon.com/Leaf-Lard-Pre...0119NBXMU?th=1


Could you please post sources (links are not necessary) to support your claims about the vitamin content of animal lard?

.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-13-2018 at 10:38 PM.
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#13 Old 01-13-2018, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by TurnipFarmer View Post

Vitamin D supplementation may do as much harm as benefit since A and K2 are required in balanced proportions to guard against soft-tissue calcification. Unfortunately, there is not an easy way out of this situation because no one knows for sure what the proper proportions should be and guessing is gambling with risks to osteo on one hand or arteria on the other.

Yes, please post your sources, even if you can't post links.

.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#14 Old 01-13-2018, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by EmeraldDS View Post
That's interesting! I would expect for veg*ns to have better dental health, but it's nice that there's a large, peer-reviewed study on it.
Please read the study! Here is the link: https://www.nature.com/articles/ejcn2013101

As I mentioned, the study showed less than a 1-tooth-average-difference in the number of eroded/filled/missing teeth between the the omnivores and vegetarians in the study. The dental health of the omnivores and vegetarians were nearly identical.
.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-13-2018 at 10:44 PM.
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#15 Old 01-14-2018, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by David3 View Post
The American Dental Association lists these foods as potentially damaging to teeth, depending on how frequently you consume them:

1. Hard candy
2. Chewing ice
3. Citrus fruits
4. Coffee and tea (with added sugar)
5. Sticky dried fruits
6. Potato chips
7. Soda
8. Alcohol
9. Sports drinks

Link:


The American Dental Association doesn't discourage people from eating healthy whole grain foods, and we shouldn't be afraid to eat them.
.
Please see:

Teeth and Bread in Ancient Egypt
F. Filce Leek
The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology
Vol. 58 (Aug., 1972), pp. 126-132

Page 132, 3rd paragraph after the numbered list beginning with the sentence "It became quite evident...". This is one example which can be found at jstor dot org.

Studies of ancient civilizations consumption of bread was a factor in attrition of teeth enamel due to biting and pulling of gritty bread. The dental wear of vegetarians and vegans could be attributed to the consumption of breads with more of a gritty texture especially considering the use of whole and sprouted grains in today's society.
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#16 Old 01-15-2018, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by PandaBanana View Post
Please see:

Teeth and Bread in Ancient Egypt
F. Filce Leek
The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology
Vol. 58 (Aug., 1972), pp. 126-132

Page 132, 3rd paragraph after the numbered list beginning with the sentence "It became quite evident...". This is one example which can be found at jstor dot org.

Studies of ancient civilizations consumption of bread was a factor in attrition of teeth enamel due to biting and pulling of gritty bread. The dental wear of vegetarians and vegans could be attributed to the consumption of breads with more of a gritty texture especially considering the use of whole and sprouted grains in today's society.

Good article, but it doesn't support the claim that bread fiber causes tooth erosion. Your cited article states that, in ancient Egypt, tooth wear from bread consumption was caused by the presence of abrasive mineral grit from the grinding-stones and from the soil, which ended up inside the bread flour. In the cited article, Figure 1 of Plate XXXII shows a magnified view of these sharp, inorganic particles. Modern grain-milling methods are much better at preventing these inorganic abrasive impurities.
.
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 01-15-2018 at 08:33 PM.
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#17 Old 01-18-2018, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Good article, but it doesn't support the claim that bread fiber causes tooth erosion. Your cited article states that, in ancient Egypt, tooth wear from bread consumption was caused by the presence of abrasive mineral grit from the grinding-stones and from the soil, which ended up inside the bread flour. In the cited article, Figure 1 of Plate XXXII shows a magnified view of these sharp, inorganic particles. Modern grain-milling methods are much better at preventing these inorganic abrasive impurities.
.
Correct, however, I cited it because the minimal difference between vegetarians and omnivores tooth erosion could be due to the use of whole grains/seeds/sprouted grains/millet etc.
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