My current issue - eggs? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 09-28-2016, 01:53 AM
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My current issue - eggs?

I strictly stick to egg whites but I've found things I was going to purchase recently containing 'whole egg' or just stating the word 'egg' not even anything more like what part of the egg was used.

I tried conveying this to a family member and they were receptive but unable to supply me with an answer.

How do yo know what you're buying? I live in a small town outside of a big city - I don't know many places (if any) that I actually can determine what I'm getting is what what I'm comfortable with. Aside from making everything by hand myself, what can I do? Is there a website with OK items for vegetarians (like a list) or is there a place online I can purchase items for a fair price?

I have recently used Amazon to buy quinoa which I recommend if you like to try, because the price is so much better than anything you'll find in the store (unless you're blessed) - I paid around $17 for 2lbs.

Thanks for the replies ahead of time.
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#2 Old 09-28-2016, 05:54 AM
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Why would you only eat the whites? If you're going to eat eggs you should at least the nutrients the whole egg provides.

$8.50 is probably the highest price I've seen for quinoa! Don't you have Aldi in Philly? I'm in NE Ohio and get it for around $5.00 a pound- maybe less

Check out online like vitacost or iherb for when they run specials like 20% off food items. I wait till I have a $50 dollar order to get free shipping and get things like Better than Boullion, supplements, matcha, nut yeast and gluten

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#3 Old 09-28-2016, 06:44 AM
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Sorry, I ignored your question, but while eggs, even the ambigious 'may contain eggs', has to posted for allergens, they are for any ingredient from eggs.
Foods containing egg would be labeled as suitable for vegetarians since that label refers to including egg or dairy, just not direct slaughter products like broth, gelatin-anything from meat.

Are you maybe thinking of the yolk as having been fertilized? Just guessing. That won't happen in store eggs as they're kept far away from any roosters

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#4 Old 09-28-2016, 10:25 AM
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Sorry, I ignored your question, but while eggs, even the ambigious 'may contain eggs', has to posted for allergens, they are for any ingredient from eggs.
Foods containing egg would be labeled as suitable for vegetarians since that label refers to including egg or dairy, just not direct slaughter products like broth, gelatin-anything from meat.

Are you maybe thinking of the yolk as having been fertilized? Just guessing. That won't happen in store eggs as they're kept far away from any roosters
I guess maybe some part of me is bothered by the fact the whole egg may be used and what you brought up about fertilization probably has been hindering my mind. For health concerns - egg whites have been the way to go - cholesterol and all (which mine is perfect, I'm in my late twenties and so far it seems I beat the whole heart disease thing that runs? in my family).

I guess eating eggs whites only has made me feel better than using eggs in general, maybe I missed a part of how they get from egg to egg whites (which I just buy the liquid egg whites) and have generally not wanted to think about how animals are mis-treated. If so I guess I need to consider an alternative. That would be my concious speaking to me and not a problem of any other nature that someone else can answer so thank you for responding.

About the quinoa prices, I can only get it online - I'm in the suburbs, and the closest Aldi is about 35 minutes away. I thought 2lbs for $17 was good (tri colored, and it was pre-washed). Quality was good. Better than local supermarket which charges $5-$7+ for 28grams or so!

If I'm missing something here though about my question - feel free to chime in - maybe I'm in need of a change I'm unaware of and another perspective may help shed light onto that.
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#5 Old 09-28-2016, 12:37 PM
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Quinoa is expensive here too, particularly if you want a nicer quality one. It has to do with import costs, I'm sure - everything seems to be more expensive in Canada.

As far as your egg issue, I too am confused as to why the egg white is OK but not the yolk? If you are concerned for ethical reasons, there is no difference to using just the white as opposed to the yolk; you cannot get to one without the other. If you are concerned for health reasons, you could easily move to a vegan egg replacer and ditch the cholesterol all together. Depending on what you are using them for, there are several options available to you. There is a product (Bob's Red Mill makes one) called egg replacer, which is vegan, and can be used in baking, but can also be expensive - I personally just use what we call a "flax egg" which is a small amount of ground up flax seeds mixed with water, which produces a gel-like substance remarkably similar to egg white and is perfect in baking. For scrambles and omelettes, you can use tofu, or even chickpea flour. If you can find it, kala namak (black salt) provides a touch of "eggy" flavour but it's totally good without
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#6 Old 09-28-2016, 01:26 PM
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If you want to eat actual eggs, then I agree with others, you might as well eat the whole thing including yolks, not just the whites. On the other hand, if for ethical reasons you want to leave eggs off your plate and are looking for a replacement, then the best-tasting option, by far, is VeganEgg by Follow Your Heart. It's not perfect and, unlike real eggs, has very little protein, so you'll feel hungry in a couple of hours after consuming it unless you have something else with protein along with it. But it does taste very good, very similar to actual scrambled eggs.

Hampton Creek is supposedly developing a product called Just Scramble that may be even better and, last I heard, is supposed to be out by the end of the year.
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#7 Old 09-28-2016, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Symondezyn View Post
Quinoa is expensive here too, particularly if you want a nicer quality one. It has to do with import costs, I'm sure - everything seems to be more expensive in Canada.

As far as your egg issue, I too am confused as to why the egg white is OK but not the yolk? If you are concerned for ethical reasons, there is no difference to using just the white as opposed to the yolk; you cannot get to one without the other. If you are concerned for health reasons, you could easily move to a vegan egg replacer and ditch the cholesterol all together. Depending on what you are using them for, there are several options available to you. There is a product (Bob's Red Mill makes one) called egg replacer, which is vegan, and can be used in baking, but can also be expensive - I personally just use what we call a "flax egg" which is a small amount of ground up flax seeds mixed with water, which produces a gel-like substance remarkably similar to egg white and is perfect in baking. For scrambles and omelettes, you can use tofu, or even chickpea flour. If you can find it, kala namak (black salt) provides a touch of "eggy" flavour but it's totally good without
Thanks for the info! Exactly what I was looking for. I've not been a fan of tofu but maybe used with other things correctly (only have used it once in my veggy burgers) it could be OK and I'm sure I'd grow accustomed to it - however the chickpea flour sounds good too. I appreciate your response.
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#8 Old 09-28-2016, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Dilettante View Post
If you want to eat actual eggs, then I agree with others, you might as well eat the whole thing including yolks, not just the whites. On the other hand, if for ethical reasons you want to leave eggs off your plate and are looking for a replacement, then the best-tasting option, by far, is VeganEgg by Follow Your Heart. It's not perfect and, unlike real eggs, has very little protein, so you'll feel hungry in a couple of hours after consuming it unless you have something else with protein along with it. But it does taste very good, very similar to actual scrambled eggs.

Hampton Creek is supposedly developing a product called Just Scramble that may be even better and, last I heard, is supposed to be out by the end of the year.
Thank you for the info! I will look into it.
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#9 Old 09-28-2016, 05:03 PM
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I love black salt--kala namak. You can find it in Indian groceries or online. It's cheap without shipping. It really tastes like egg- I first got it for my son who liked eggs, but it's amazing when mixed with other flavors. I love it with nutritional yeast, it somehow enhances the cheesey taste I really didn't find in nut yeast by itself
I love a tofu scramble. Have you ever used liquid smoke? I sautee some veggies till half done, add crumbled firm tofu and about a half cup of water with a teaspoon or two of liquid smoke and let cook till all absorbed. I also like a bit of maple syrup

I keep a jar of this mix in my fridge- it's really easy to pour over some wilted spinach or sauteed veggies--
http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2014/12...melet-mix.html

As for replacing eggs in recipes-- it just takes trying! I use flax goop, or chickpea flour (besan) in things where binding is important, corn starch or other starches where I don't want it too heavy, and silken tofu for things where moisture and substance is needed. All I know is that I like to play with recipes!
Cake gets a combo of baking soda and vinegar for the win!
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#10 Old 09-28-2016, 05:43 PM
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Silva is right-on about the Indian black salt. If you put it on avocado, it tastes a lot like hard-boiled egg yolk.
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Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#11 Old 09-28-2016, 05:48 PM
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So far I've tried checking out VitaCost and it's awesome! They have everything I need to make some changes that I'd like to make much sooner than later, and their prices are very good - the free shipping over $50 is nice too (which would have stopped me from buying cans over bags) so thank you

I'm going to try the flax grounds, black salt, and chickpea powder, as well as some of the pasta on there that seems to be the next step for me from what I can get at the grocery store.

When I get a chance to order, and/or attempt to make my vegan-(ish) egg replacement I will let you guys know how it went!
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#12 Old 09-28-2016, 06:05 PM
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@highlyoriginal --have you ever tried Better Than Bouillion no chicken or no beef bases? they're awesome for flavoring just about anything! The no beef is hard to find now, but makes a great french onion soup

Always search for 'promo codes' before ordering online!

Do you have an Indian or Asian grocery?

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#13 Old 09-28-2016, 06:09 PM
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Just another thought when it comes to eggs, specifically regarding baking (and I'm not really an expert on this!), but I can say the following.

There are, as far as I can tell, two main purposes of eggs in baking. One is texture, and that's the easiest to replace. This comes up in things like corn bread and pancakes. All you need to replace the eggs is something off the shelf like "Ener-G" brand egg replacer. The baked product will be identical to one baked with actual eggs. Easy peasy.

The second purpose of eggs in baking is, in certain items, to use the special property of egg protein which is to solidify when heated. Notice that eggs actually solidify when heated, whereas most substances go the other way and liquify when heated. This is because the molecular shape of egg protein amino acids changes when heated, causing solidification. This property of eggs is used when baking custard-type items, like custard, flan, and pumpkin pie. This solidification use of eggs when baking is much harder to replicate with a vegan replacement. Perhaps the best way is by using agar powder, which is algae based. I've tried it with pumpkin pie. It works, but not under high heat. So it's necessary to mix the agar powder into the pie, bake it, then remove it from the oven and let it cool down for several hours. By the end of the cooling process, you'll have a perfect pie. If you try to use a standard egg replacer in a pumpkin pie, you'll just get a messy goop after cooking. The other thing about agar powder is that if you use too much of it, the pie will be hard as a rock, and if you use too little, the pie will be a liquidy goop. So it's necessary to use the approximate right amount. Agar powder should work not only in pumpkin pie but, I suspect, in anything that depends on the solidifying property of eggs--so custard and flan.

Last edited by Dilettante; 09-28-2016 at 06:30 PM.
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#14 Old 09-28-2016, 06:34 PM
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Agar is a direct replacement of gelatin and only solid when cooled.
It's funny you use an example of pumpkin since starches such as corn, tapioca or potato starch are the usual replacements- with some using tofu. A tablespoon of starch works great for thickening/solidifying. Besan, chickpea flour, does the same to a greater extent

The liquid from cooking chickpeas, called aquafaba, has been the most recent innovation in replacing eggs for their lightening qualities in things like meranques. I haven't tried this yet, but I bet it does a good brownie, which I haven't had near a regular one yet.

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#15 Old 09-28-2016, 06:47 PM
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Agar is a direct replacement of gelatin and only solid when cooled. It's funny you use an example of pumpkin since starches such as corn, tapioca or potato starch are the usual replacements- with some using tofu. A tablespoon of starch works great for thickening/solidifying. Besan, chickpea flour, does the same to a greater extent

I love pumpkin pie, and a couple of years ago, I started trying to bake them without eggs and have been developing the recipe since. Corn starch on its own does not seem to solidify them, unless one needs to use way more of it than I have used. The only thing I have found that works, with cooling, is agar powder. I have not tried tofu. In any event, with agar powder it ends up tasting exactly like a traditional pumpkin pie. I took one to Thanksgiving dinner last year, and my omni relatives had not a clue that it was anything other than a traditional pie.

Here is the recipe I have developed after experimentation:

Ingredients:
1 15-oz can pumpkin pie filling (used Libby’s brand)
1 cup coconut cream (used Trader Joe’s brand)
½ cup soymilk (used Silk Brand original)
1-1/4 teaspoon agar powder
1 tablespoon cornstarch
¾ cup packed brown sugar (light brown)
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice blend
¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons water
One 8-inch vegan pie crust, frozen.

Directions:
Combine everything except agar powder, water, and crust in a mixing bowl. Stir.
Gently add agar powder. Stir.
Add water. Stir.
Pour into pie crust.
Place in oven preheated to 375 degrees. Bake approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove. Cool on rack for one hour, then chill in refrigerator until firm, or about three hours.
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Last edited by Dilettante; 09-28-2016 at 10:04 PM.
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#16 Old 09-29-2016, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post

The liquid from cooking chickpeas, called aquafaba, has been the most recent innovation in replacing eggs for their lightening qualities in things like meranques. I haven't tried this yet, but I bet it does a good brownie, which I haven't had near a regular one yet.
I pre-ordered the Aquafaba book which is scheduled to come out in October. Apparently you can use bean water for a great number of things, including vegan cheese! :O I'm all about doing science experiments in the kitchen so I'll let you guys know how it goes! ^_^
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#17 Old 09-29-2016, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Dilettante View Post
Agar is a direct replacement of gelatin and only solid when cooled. It's funny you use an example of pumpkin since starches such as corn, tapioca or potato starch are the usual replacements- with some using tofu. A tablespoon of starch works great for thickening/solidifying. Besan, chickpea flour, does the same to a greater extent

I love pumpkin pie, and a couple of years ago, I started trying to bake them without eggs and have been developing the recipe since. Corn starch on its own does not seem to solidify them, unless one needs to use way more of it than I have used. The only thing I have found that works, with cooling, is agar powder. I have not tried tofu. In any event, with agar powder it ends up tasting exactly like a traditional pumpkin pie. I took one to Thanksgiving dinner last year, and my omni relatives had not a clue that it was anything other than a traditional pie.

Here is the recipe I have developed after experimentation:

Ingredients:
1 15-oz can pumpkin pie filling (used Libby’s brand)
1 cup coconut cream (used Trader Joe’s brand)
½ cup soymilk (used Silk Brand original)
1-1/4 teaspoon agar powder
1 tablespoon cornstarch
¾ cup packed brown sugar (light brown)
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice blend
¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons water
One 8-inch vegan pie crust, frozen.

Directions:
Combine everything except agar powder, water, and crust in a mixing bowl. Stir.
Gently add agar powder. Stir.
Add water. Stir.
Pour into pie crust.
Place in oven preheated to 375 degrees. Bake approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove. Cool on rack for one hour, then chill in refrigerator until firm, or about three hours.
That's super interesting!! I've only used agar to firm vegan cheeses but it makes sense that it could work in this case - nicely done with the experimenting!! I love pumpkin pie - I will have to try this; thanks for the recipe! ^_^
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