Omnivores - Hypocrites? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 10-03-2015, 03:30 AM
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Omnivores - Hypocrites?

What I cannot stand is the hypocrisy some omnivores possess. They fight for animal rights, complain about abuse against all animals, yet they think it is perfectly fine to be ignorant towards the abuse that animals reared for food in and out of the slaughterhouses suffer. They seem to ignore the pain these animals feel when their lives are abruptly ended or when they are injected with chemicals causing marked weight gain (losing the ability to walk and breathe properly) , kicked or confined in tiny areas allowing little movement. I have come to the conclusion that just because farm animals are not as "cute" or "fluffy" as cats and dogs, it is somewhat okay for animals to be abused and treated with disrespect. This includes "tasty" or "unintelligent" animals. Notice all omnivores like animals out of their food chain often? It is hypocrisy. Being slaughtered against its own will and without consent is abuse at its best. And so does being confined in small spaces, being treated with disrespect, kicked, and the list goes on.

It seems to me the mentality of self-proclaimed animal lovers are like this: "I cannot tolerate abuse against ALL animals... Except less cute ones like cow, chicken and pigs because they taste good and are least intelligent. Therefore I should feel less guilty about these desires. "

Until aliens descend onto Earth, rear humans for meat and think they are suitable for consumption just because they are more advanced and intelligent than them, people will never understand the fear and excruciating pain animals reared for food go through.
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#2 Old 10-03-2015, 04:03 AM
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Here, here....

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#3 Old 10-03-2015, 05:39 AM
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Originally Posted by PilotInCommand
Omnivores - Hypocrites?
Yes.


But you know what else is cute and fluffy?

Friggen' FRUIT BATS.


Fruit bats are awesome!

The only reasons people don't like them is because they're vegans, and nothing terrifies the masses more than a vegan who can fly.
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#4 Old 10-03-2015, 08:56 AM
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Intresting thought, eating human meat. Many years ago, I nearly died of peritonitis due to a ruptured appendix I had been walking around with for nearly a year. Any way, the wound from the operation was huge and had to remain open to drain. At one point, the nurses came in to change the dressing, and pulled a ton of gauzy stuff out of the wound. I really wanted to look, and asked if I could. I had been about 1/2 hour away from real death when they brought me in, so this was prolonged, gruesome and real. Anyway, they said, go ahead, and I looked and saw---MEAT!!! Yup, I was made of meat. It looked like the kind of the dark pink stuff people buy at the grocery store. I became a vegetarian due to that experience and a few others. It took me some time to make the connections, and I was brought up in a big meat eating family. It was strange though, looking into my own body and seeing I was not made of cotton candy, but USDA grade Human meat.
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#5 Old 10-03-2015, 09:39 AM
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I like how people constantly refer to as Asians eating dogs as backwards savages between mouthfuls of double bacon cheeseburger. Or horse slaughter as cruel as they bbq a giant steak.
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#6 Old 10-03-2015, 10:55 AM
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Absolutely. It disgusts me how people consider themselves lovers of animals yet eat them. I love all animals and won't eat any. Such hypocrites. They consider themselves "lions" too and think eating meat portrays them as "stronger", "savage" and more "brave", thinking that if they eat like a lion, they can inherit those attributes. Yet, these idiots cannot kill these animals with their own hands or eat the meat raw without any seasoning.
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#7 Old 10-03-2015, 02:00 PM
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I've never heard of an omni working for animal rights. They might be active in animal welfare, but not rights.
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#8 Old 10-03-2015, 06:10 PM
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Yup, I was made of meat. It looked like the kind of the dark pink stuff people buy at the grocery store. I became a vegetarian due to that experience
So more people would become vegetarian if they had holes in them. Hmmm...

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#9 Old 10-03-2015, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Gita View Post
Intresting thought, eating human meat. Many years ago, I nearly died of peritonitis due to a ruptured appendix I had been walking around with for nearly a year. Any way, the wound from the operation was huge and had to remain open to drain. At one point, the nurses came in to change the dressing, and pulled a ton of gauzy stuff out of the wound. I really wanted to look, and asked if I could. I had been about 1/2 hour away from real death when they brought me in, so this was prolonged, gruesome and real. Anyway, they said, go ahead, and I looked and saw---MEAT!!! Yup, I was made of meat. It looked like the kind of the dark pink stuff people buy at the grocery store. I became a vegetarian due to that experience and a few others. It took me some time to make the connections, and I was brought up in a big meat eating family. It was strange though, looking into my own body and seeing I was not made of cotton candy, but USDA grade Human meat.
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So more people would become vegetarian if they had holes in them. Hmmm...

I shouldn't laugh, but that's funny, in a horrible way.
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#10 Old 10-03-2015, 07:22 PM
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So more people would become vegetarian if they had holes in them. Hmmm...

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#11 Old 10-03-2015, 07:33 PM
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I chose to transition to vegan for health reasons rather than a concern for animal rights.

So, I'm technically one of these hypocrites you're talking about. I love my excruciatingly fluffy and adorable cat, but I don't have qualms with eating animal products. I have a problem with factory/warehouse farming for livestock and the cruel conditions that chickens are brought up in, but I grew up eating animal products, and so I'm jaded to the whole morality discussion.

In a way, I do feel guilt. But it's a guilt for the absence of feeling guilt, if that makes sense. I care for what is under my responsibility. I would never want the death of the horses, goats, dogs, and cats that my parents owned. I never wanted the death of my next door neighbor's cow, who I used to feed through the fence and speak lovingly to it as it grew into an adult. I remember feeling sadness when one day the cow was gone, and when I asked about it, I learned the cow had been taken in to be slaughtered for meat. I remember asking my friend, the son of those neighbors, if he felt bad, how he could eat it when it had been his family's pet, and he simply replied in jokes and smiles, "Nope, it's too tasty."

In short, we tend to form attachments to animals we are brought up with, but not animals elsewhere, though exceptions are made when people can find a certain type of animal attractive. I.e., wolves, lions, bears, tigers, oh my. It's the same sort of feeling of disconnect when it comes to the disparity between the government's treatment of minorities. I'm not native american, so I have a disconnect with the way Canada treats its indigenous populace. Did you know that the last concentration-camp-like boarding school that forcibly ripped native american children from their homes to "teach them western culture" and how to more properly blend in only closed as early as 1980? I didn't until a year ago. It's a similar sort of disconnect, and awareness of the situation doesn't teach motivation to change it.

Many American families (I can't speak for other countries) grow up with food traditions that are centered on meat consumption. When you do something for 15+ years and nobody during that time tells you that it's wrong, and positive, family centered holidays are centered around it--Easter lamb, Thanksgiving Turkey, Christmas ham, etc.--it happens. In other words, we're taught from a young age to associate the consumption of meat as an act of bonding.

Want to get rid of the hypocrites?

Don't shun them. Don't try to shame them for their budding interests. Instead, encourage their development. Gently offer them material. Create family challenges with your friends and colleagues. Introduce them to friendly introductions into veganism, such as VB6, or to simply have a meatless monday. Becoming concerned with animal welfare (as someone mentioned) is a step in the right direction to becoming concerned with animal rights.
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#12 Old 10-03-2015, 07:50 PM
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Here's my current bumper sticker; I think its message makes my feelings very clear.

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#13 Old 10-03-2015, 08:04 PM
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I shouldn't laugh, but that's funny, in a horrible way.
*bursts out laughing*

We need at least one vegan on this website that'll go there. This atmosphere breeds a suffocating degree of pacifism.

I mean seriously, with as much tree-hugging as we do, you'd think we'd be able to break the back of anyone we could get within arms reach of. Imagine the possibilities...


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#14 Old 10-03-2015, 08:43 PM
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I've never heard of an omni working for animal rights. They might be active in animal welfare, but not rights.
You hadn't met me, back in my just-before-turning vegetarian days. I was full-on ARA, militant as can be, out walking the walk and talking the talk, doing protests/boycotts, cutting up my American Express card and sending it in, telling them until they stopped promoting the sale of fur [in their mailings] I didn't want to be a cardholder any more, the whole works. And I still ate meat. Oh, it wasn't very long before everything clicked, but there definitely was some lag time between when I first really became involved in animal rights and when I made the switch to strict vegetarianism. So it DOES happen. Sometimes.

For me, the only explanation I can think of or that sounds plausible--this many years on--is that I didn't really know how cruel and abusive the meat industry actually is. I was brought up thinking--or, more accurately, NOT thinking--about meat at all, at least not in terms of its origins, how it ends up on my table, etc., just that meat animals are "put on this earth for us to use!" I even remember saying something like that to my brother-in-law, who has been vegetarian since the '70s, i.e., "but that's what they're here for!" Oh well. I can't say I'm proud of it, but there it is.

I'd like to think that if EVERYONE watched undercover videos of factory farms and slaughterhouses, the MAJORITY of them would go veg immediately. Sure, there would be some people who just frankly don't give a crap about the suffering, but a lot of people would. It's just getting them to watch...that's the hurdle.
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#15 Old 10-03-2015, 11:17 PM
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I have to disagree and say it's still welfarism/utilitarianism if it isn't abolition/rights. Saying you're an ARA while eating animals is like claiming you're a Christian and only worshipping Satan once a week. It just doesn't work. There's a great deal of overlap with rights and welfare, but they're fundamentally different. I understand that you believe you were an ARA, but if you were still eating them, you hadn't made the full connection (as you admit), and therefore, it stays in the realm of welfare. In your case, it sounds like utilitarianism.

A lot of people start as welfarists, joining the AR causes when they agree. Later, they see the light and move toward abolition.

Lastly, if someone's not full-on rights/abolition, they're welfarists.
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#16 Old 10-03-2015, 11:51 PM
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I chose to transition to vegan for health reasons rather than a concern for animal rights... I don't have qualms with eating animal products.
A concern for animal rights is central to the philosophy of veganism. Sounds like you're what's called a strict vegetarian or a plant-based dieter.

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When you do something for 15+ years and nobody during that time tells you that it's wrong, and positive, family centered holidays are centered around it--Easter lamb, Thanksgiving Turkey, Christmas ham, etc.--it happens. In other words, we're taught from a young age to associate the consumption of meat as an act of bonding.
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For me, the only explanation I can think of or that sounds plausible--this many years on--is that I didn't really know how cruel and abusive the meat industry actually is. I was brought up thinking--or, more accurately, NOT thinking--about meat at all, at least not in terms of its origins, how it ends up on my table, etc., just that meat animals are "put on this earth for us to use!" I even remember saying something like that to my brother-in-law, who has been vegetarian since the '70s, i.e., "but that's what they're here for!" Oh well. I can't say I'm proud of it, but there it is.
This is precisely why I don't place the blame on individual meat eaters, as much as I am repulsed by the act itself. The cultural tradition of eating animals is so deeply ingrained, so normalised, that to question it never even occurs to most people-- not even kind, compassionate people who love (other) animals. My mother, for example, is a particularly empathetic and gentle woman who adores her pets, feeds strays, donates to the ASPCA, and feels compelled to cuddle and nurture any living thing she happens upon, but who loves eating McDonald's cheeseburgers. I've been trying to convince her to give up meat for over twenty years and it's only recently that she's expressed an interest in trying. It's hard for me to understand how she can eat meat without feeling sorry for the animals. I know my mother and I know that she would hate to see a dying cow, that she would be devastated if someone slit a pig's throat in front of her, yet the disconnect is THAT strong that she can happily eat a burger without a glimmer of remorse. Denial is powerful.
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#17 Old 10-04-2015, 12:48 AM
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You are right. I should gently try and convince those meat eaters to transition into vegetarians by showing them footage of animals being slaughtered. I personally strongly dislike animal lovers that eat meat than any other meat eater that knows where meat comes from and treat any other animals equally. They are being biased heavily by one group of animals than fodder (animals raised for food). Indeed, slaughterhouse factory footages did the transition for me.

Do most animal-loving meat eaters thinking that meat falls from the sky or disassembles itself from an animal once exposed to the dire effects of gravity?

I don't mind any meat eater that isn't informed and horrified with how meat comes into production; it's just those with who know where meat comes from, how animals suffer and abused but continue to eat meat and support animal welfare/claim to love animals.

It doesn't take a genius to realise this IS hypocrisy. I can't appreciate chickens, love them but eat them at the same time.
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#18 Old 10-04-2015, 01:13 AM
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[quote=no whey jose;3792897]A concern for animal rights is central to the philosophy of veganism. Sounds like you're what's called a strict vegetarian or a plant-based dieter.

...The cultural tradition of eating animals is so deeply ingrained, so normalised, that to question it never even occurs to most people-- not even kind, compassionate people who love (other) animals. ... that she would be devastated if someone slit a pig's throat in front of her, yet the disconnect is THAT strong that she can happily eat a burger without a glimmer of remorse. Denial is powerful.[/QUOTE]

This, so much.

And hey, one day I might be a vegan for the philosophical reasons! But for right now, it's merely a dietary interest that I can feel slightly fuzzy and happy about in knowing that I'm doing something positive in its own little significant way. And well, vegan is a pretty short word to have to type out in relaying my dietary interests.

I watch the documentaries, I listen to the TED talks, there's just currently no information that I haven't seen already that's going to bridge the moral disconnect. Perhaps the longer I expose myself to the vegan community the more it will rub off.

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Originally Posted by PilotInCommand View Post
You are right. I should gently try and convince those meat eaters to transition into vegetarians by showing them footage of animals being slaughtered.
You can be sarcastic if you like. But holding a quiet (albeit in this case, loud) disdain for hypocrites doesn't do much. You could try shaming a meat-eating hypocrite into joining the cause, but chances are you're just going to turn them off, make them indignant, and reboot the justification loop where they firmly plant their heels in the ground declaring, "You can't tell me what I feel!"

If someone is already compassionate toward animals and shows an active interest in their welfare, but has yet to commit to abstaining from animal products--well, that's just a few short steps away, isn't it? Think about it. They're educated. They know what's going on. They may even be committed to buying less meat product and to not be as wasteful with portions. You can either raise your nose and glare at them from afar, or you can be a friendly voice of encouragement.

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It doesn't take a genius to realise this IS hypocrisy.
It very much is.

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I can't appreciate chickens, love them but eat them at the same time.
The way you experience emotions is unique to your own being. Let's call it individuality. You're equating all living creatures in one large lump, and that's a wonderful, and ideal mindset that I wish everyone could share. Not everyone has the capacity to do that, and not everyone has the capacity to break past being able to objectify beings that they consider "lesser than". It takes a new paradigm of thinking, and shock treatment as you mentioned--the brief mentioning of your transition--can work, but for other people it takes slow and steady reinforcement and immersion in a community that supports that paradigm.
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#19 Old 10-04-2015, 01:26 AM
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I have to disagree and say it's still welfarism/utilitarianism if it isn't abolition/rights. Saying you're an ARA while eating animals is like claiming you're a Christian and only worshipping Satan once a week. It just doesn't work. There's a great deal of overlap with rights and welfare, but they're fundamentally different. I understand that you believe you were an ARA, but if you were still eating them, you hadn't made the full connection (as you admit), and therefore, it stays in the realm of welfare. In your case, it sounds like utilitarianism.
Well, we're going to have to agree to disagree. I was there. I remember some of the specific causes I was involved in, such as protesting against and boycotting L'Oreal over their insistence on testing on animals and using animal-based ingredients, or working toward shutting down various labs that were guilty of heinous cruelty to dogs, monkeys, cats, and other sentient beings--I STILL get upset thinking about some of the things I learned back then, like how dogs' vocal cords were severed so the 'people' tormenting them didn't have to listen to their cries.

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This is precisely why I don't place the blame on individual meat eaters, as much as I am repulsed by the act itself. The cultural tradition of eating animals is so deeply ingrained, so normalised, that to question it never even occurs to most people-- not even kind, compassionate people who love (other) animals.
Thank you. That's very well said.

Quote:
My mother, for example, is a particularly empathetic and gentle woman who adores her pets, feeds strays, donates to the ASPCA, and feels compelled to cuddle and nurture any living thing she happens upon, but who loves eating McDonald's cheeseburgers.
That's how my mom was, too. She would never DREAM of hurting an animal, but she had ZERO qualms about eating meat. She even told me that way back when, back in the days when the neighborhood butcher shop had live chickens that you'd go in and pick from, and then take it home and kill it yourself, she DID that. Her parents would send her to the butcher and she'd come home with a chicken, and they'd "wring its neck." Understand that when she was telling me this, she was in her late 80s and facing the end of her life, and although she'd been vegetarian for 7 years [since I moved back here], telling this story would bring her to tears. Even though it was 75+ years earlier that she participated in that activity, and even though she was a child at the time, and even though NO ONE gave a second thought to killing a chicken and having it for dinner back then, she felt HORRIBLE about it in present day. Kind of like how I wish I could turn the clock back and have gone veggie years before I actually did--I know I can't, but I feel awful about it anyway.

Quote:
I've been trying to convince her to give up meat for over twenty years and it's only recently that she's expressed an interest in trying.
Hang in there! I started working on my mom back in the '80s, but it wasn't until 2006 that she took the plunge. So there's always hope!

Quote:
It's hard for me to understand how she can eat meat without feeling sorry for the animals. I know my mother and I know that she would hate to see a dying cow, that she would be devastated if someone slit a pig's throat in front of her, yet the disconnect is THAT strong that she can happily eat a burger without a glimmer of remorse. Denial is powerful.
Exactly. And that was my point earlier. I most definitely WAS involved in animal rights, but simply hadn't gotten over that strong, lifelong, powerful, disconnect when it comes to animals used for meat. I knew about lab animals and the atrocities they were being subjected to; I knew about steel-jaw traps; I knew about the fur industry; but I didn't know, yet, that there's virtually no protection, no welfare oversight agency, NOTHING, to regulate what happens to animals raised for food. I assumed, this being the US and everything--and knowing that we have laws against animal cruelty when it comes to pet animals--that SOMEONE was actually overseeing the meat industry in terms of protecting the animals. I was wrong. As soon as I found out what's really involved in putting meat on the table, I was done.
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#20 Old 10-04-2015, 06:51 AM
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I don't hate meat eaters either. I mean yeah when I went vegan for ethical reasons I was shocked, angry and wanted to go on a crusade lol. But being a pacifist I calmed down eventually and though of other ways I could gently help animals and educate people without being that pushy snobby aggressive vegan that omnis hate so much and bash in every discussions.
I could say I pity omnis for being the victims of their culture and hope with all my heart that they open their eyes even just a little, even for meatless mondays you know. A small start is better then none. But I know that in this era of cheese and bacon things are changing fast and my hope is uplifted. The population is splitting (not equally mind you). Plant based diet is growing in popularity, I'm even happy that it's becoming a trend for some and a medical *cure* for others suffering from high blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol and are following their doctor's recommendations. Heck some people eat meatless meals here and there for budget friendly meals. Some omnis started cooking some vegan desserts for a healthier option. Every bits help and amongst all those people, we're bound to find some that will transition to veganism when they realize the truth and slowly gain more empathy for the planet as a whole (I include people in that too, abuse towards animals is as bad as abuse towards humans).

So, PilotInCommand, have faith, things are changing, heck recycling has become the norm now for a lot of countries, who would have thought? And Sadrielle, don't feel bad, empathy is not felt in the same way by everyone. If it upsets you that you can't yet feel empathic towards farm animals that aren't close to you, maybe visiting a farm petting zoo could help with that connection. And if it never comes, no problem, a strict vegetarian/plant dieter will get tons of hugs too from the majority of vegans, your diet is awesome and we love you

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#21 Old 10-04-2015, 06:57 AM
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Yes.


But you know what else is cute and fluffy?

Friggen' FRUIT BATS.


Fruit bats are awesome!

The only reasons people don't like them is because they're vegans, and nothing terrifies the masses more than a vegan who can fly.
You are so awesome ROFL. That should be a signature quote. I absolutely love bats, the ugly and the cute ones, it's an obsession, I have a flight of bats tattoo coming from a belfry (not finished yet, low budget lol) and even those kind of wall vinyl decal in my bedroom https://img1.etsystatic.com/006/0/52...69289_kxlj.jpg
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#22 Old 10-04-2015, 09:02 AM
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You are right. I should gently try and convince those meat eaters to transition into vegetarians by showing them footage of animals being slaughtered.
I imagine the horrorstruck looks on somebody's face who believes vegetarianism is just some crazy agenda after hearing you say that.

"You're right... I SHOULD try to convince heathens that Islam is the one true religion by bombing their airports."

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Originally Posted by PilotInCommand
Do most animal-loving meat eaters thinking that meat falls from the sky or disassembles itself from an animal once exposed to the dire effects of gravity?
No, they've just played too much Cruis'n World.


Fun game.

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That should be a signature quote. I absolutely love bats,
Done and here ya go:

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#23 Old 10-04-2015, 10:48 AM
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#24 Old 10-04-2015, 12:11 PM
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[quote=Sadrielle;3792945]
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Originally Posted by no whey jose View Post
A concern for animal rights is central to the philosophy of veganism. Sounds like you're what's called a strict vegetarian or a plant-based dieter.

...The cultural tradition of eating animals is so deeply ingrained, so normalised, that to question it never even occurs to most people-- not even kind, compassionate people who love (other) animals. ... that she would be devastated if someone slit a pig's throat in front of her, yet the disconnect is THAT strong that she can happily eat a burger without a glimmer of remorse. Denial is powerful.[/QUOTE]

This, so much.

And hey, one day I might be a vegan for the philosophical reasons! But for right now, it's merely a dietary interest that I can feel slightly fuzzy and happy about in knowing that I'm doing something positive in its own little significant way. And well, vegan is a pretty short word to have to type out in relaying my dietary interests.

I watch the documentaries, I listen to the TED talks, there's just currently no information that I haven't seen already that's going to bridge the moral disconnect. Perhaps the longer I expose myself to the vegan community the more it will rub off.



You can be sarcastic if you like. But holding a quiet (albeit in this case, loud) disdain for hypocrites doesn't do much. You could try shaming a meat-eating hypocrite into joining the cause, but chances are you're just going to turn them off, make them indignant, and reboot the justification loop where they firmly plant their heels in the ground declaring, "You can't tell me what I feel!"

If someone is already compassionate toward animals and shows an active interest in their welfare, but has yet to commit to abstaining from animal products--well, that's just a few short steps away, isn't it? Think about it. They're educated. They know what's going on. They may even be committed to buying less meat product and to not be as wasteful with portions. You can either raise your nose and glare at them from afar, or you can be a friendly voice of encouragement.



It very much is.



The way you experience emotions is unique to your own being. Let's call it individuality. You're equating all living creatures in one large lump, and that's a wonderful, and ideal mindset that I wish everyone could share. Not everyone has the capacity to do that, and not everyone has the capacity to break past being able to objectify beings that they consider "lesser than". It takes a new paradigm of thinking, and shock treatment as you mentioned--the brief mentioning of your transition--can work, but for other people it takes slow and steady reinforcement and immersion in a community that supports that paradigm.
Very well put. Thank you for sharing your thoughts!
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#25 Old 10-04-2015, 12:19 PM
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Well, we're going to have to agree to disagree. I was there. I remember some of the specific causes I was involved in, such as protesting against and boycotting L'Oreal over their insistence on testing on animals and using animal-based ingredients, or working toward shutting down various labs that were guilty of heinous cruelty to dogs, monkeys, cats, and other sentient beings--I STILL get upset thinking about some of the things I learned back then, like how dogs' vocal cords were severed so the 'people' tormenting them didn't have to listen to their cries.



Thank you. That's very well said.



That's how my mom was, too. She would never DREAM of hurting an animal, but she had ZERO qualms about eating meat. She even told me that way back when, back in the days when the neighborhood butcher shop had live chickens that you'd go in and pick from, and then take it home and kill it yourself, she DID that. Her parents would send her to the butcher and she'd come home with a chicken, and they'd "wring its neck." Understand that when she was telling me this, she was in her late 80s and facing the end of her life, and although she'd been vegetarian for 7 years [since I moved back here], telling this story would bring her to tears. Even though it was 75+ years earlier that she participated in that activity, and even though she was a child at the time, and even though NO ONE gave a second thought to killing a chicken and having it for dinner back then, she felt HORRIBLE about it in present day. Kind of like how I wish I could turn the clock back and have gone veggie years before I actually did--I know I can't, but I feel awful about it anyway.



Hang in there! I started working on my mom back in the '80s, but it wasn't until 2006 that she took the plunge. So there's always hope!



Exactly. And that was my point earlier. I most definitely WAS involved in animal rights, but simply hadn't gotten over that strong, lifelong, powerful, disconnect when it comes to animals used for meat. I knew about lab animals and the atrocities they were being subjected to; I knew about steel-jaw traps; I knew about the fur industry; but I didn't know, yet, that there's virtually no protection, no welfare oversight agency, NOTHING, to regulate what happens to animals raised for food. I assumed, this being the US and everything--and knowing that we have laws against animal cruelty when it comes to pet animals--that SOMEONE was actually overseeing the meat industry in terms of protecting the animals. I was wrong. As soon as I found out what's really involved in putting meat on the table, I was done.
Thanks for sharing about your mother. It gives me hope for mine!
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#26 Old 10-04-2015, 02:09 PM
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You are right. I should gently try and convince those meat eaters to transition into vegetarians by showing them footage of animals being slaughtered. I personally strongly dislike animal lovers that eat meat than any other meat eater that knows where meat comes from and treat any other animals equally. They are being biased heavily by one group of animals than fodder (animals raised for food). Indeed, slaughterhouse factory footages did the transition for me.
I believe that most people, if given the opportunity to watch some undercover videos of factory farms and slaughterhouses, would at least start THINKING about moving away from meat. I like to believe that people are inherently good, and that when given the opportunity to do the right thing, most will choose that path. If you can present some videos to meat eaters, but do it in a nonthreatening, non-obnoxious manner, they might be open-minded enough to actually absorb what they see and then think about it.

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Do most animal-loving meat eaters thinking that meat falls from the sky or disassembles itself from an animal once exposed to the dire effects of gravity?
Great point! It amazes me how meat eaters who claim to love animals don't connect the dots when it comes to the slab of flesh in their refrigerator and the pets they love and take great care of. But, as noted elsewhere, I was guilty of that same crime. It takes education, because we're brought up to think of CERTAIN animal flesh as nothing more than another commodity, like corn or wheat or potato chips.

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It doesn't take a genius to realise this IS hypocrisy. I can't appreciate chickens, love them but eat them at the same time.
Funny you should say that. One time my niece commented that she "loves chicken" and couldn't possibly give it up. I said, "well, no, you definitely DON'T love chickens, because if you did you wouldn't want them to suffer and be killed..." * look of shock on niece's face *
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#27 Old 10-04-2015, 03:32 PM
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One time my niece commented that she "loves chicken" and couldn't possibly give it up. I said, "well, no, you definitely DON'T love chickens, because if you did you wouldn't want them to suffer and be killed..." * look of shock on niece's face *
Wait, chickens die if they are killed?!


That is some frightening Truth in Television.
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#28 Old 10-04-2015, 06:57 PM
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If you can present some videos to meat eaters, but do it in a nonthreatening, non-obnoxious manner, they might be open-minded enough to actually absorb what they see and then think about it.
I second this. I'm trying to persuade my husband to watch Earthlings with me tonight, which he probably will because he's supportive of my pursuits in life. I don't expect it to change what he eats in the long run, but like you mentioned, approaching in a kind and generous manner makes it easier for someone to take the material and actually think about it rather than outright dismiss it. Intrusive, abrasive behavior is always going to incite a defensive one in return, and when people get on the defensive, they immediately become dumb no matter who they are. It's why internet trolls are so successful.

I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in.
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#29 Old 10-04-2015, 07:54 PM
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There is no harm in educating. Like you have all said, those hypocrites possess good potential of becoming vegetarians themselves. I, myself, did know that meat comes from slaughtered animals, but I did not know that death could be so excruciating and painful. I remembered my mom slicing chicken for our dinner, and saw my mom tearing apart the ribs and legs. I realized how disgusting and cruel that was. I know that the chicken was dead, but to have a body torn in such a disrespectful way and bones tossed into the bin, and go on as if the animal never existed in the first place, was disgusting. These are sentient beings. The same goes for all animals reared for food. It is cruel either ways, whether humanely slaughtered or not, because animals of course, die without consent. It is unnecessary to put so much suffering on the dinner table just to have one meal. Sowing a rice field farmed is so much more eco-friendly and could feed thousands of people. Farming meat causes greenhouse gas emissions and can only feed hundreds of people.

I try and educate people where meat comes from, and question if they were comfortable with the aspect that the "meat" was once female/male, had a mother/father and was a cute, intelligent and friendly creature. I don't think many people are comfortable with that aspect, since many people hate seeing the animal's head on their plates. Showing them footages of cruelty can open their eyes to how cruel humans can be, and greedy. And the saying "if slaughterhouse factories had glass walls, everyone would be vegetarian" is very true. People cannot be immune to any of this knowledge and not know where meat comes from. If we don't educate and show them how animals become processed food, it is equivalent to pulling a woolen blanket over their eyes.

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#30 Old 10-04-2015, 08:45 PM
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I, myself, did know that meat comes from slaughtered animals, but I did not know that death could be so excruciating and painful. I remembered my mom slicing chicken for our dinner, and saw my mom tearing apart the ribs and legs. I realized how disgusting and cruel that was. I know that the chicken was dead, but to have a body torn in such a disrespectful way and bones tossed into the bin, and go on as if the animal never existed in the first place, was disgusting.
Honestly, I'm GLAD I didn't think it out like that when I was a child. That's because I know, unequivocally, that if I had wanted to eschew meat back then I wouldn't have been allowed to. That's just how it was. So I'm glad I didn't make the connection...or I would've had a horrible, miserable time dealing with having to eat something I now realized was once not very different from my pets.

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These are sentient beings.
...
I try and educate people where meat comes from, and question if they were comfortable with the aspect that the "meat" was once female/male, had a mother/father and was a cute, intelligent and friendly creature.
Because of where I live, in Arcadia, California, I'm blessed with the daily presence of the most beautiful birds on earth, peacocks (actually, peafowl, as only the males are called peacocks). They live in and roam our neighborhoods, and are daily visitors in my yard. Right now we're seeing the results of spring's mating season, i.e., sweet, cute, cuddly chicks wandering the neighborhood with their moms. EVERY SINGLE TIME a meat-eating visitor is at my house and they comment on how cute the chicks are, or how sweet it is to see the moms interacting with their children, I seize the opportunity to interject that chickens, turkeys, pigs, cows, sheep, etc., would ALSO share sweet moments like that if only they were allowed to. I say that there's no difference between the cute little peafowl chicks and baby chickens, except that we--meaning our society--have deemed the former 'cute' animals and the latter 'food' animals.

I posted an entry in my blog some time ago, but if anyone wants to take a look, please do. It's about the arrival of babies and has lots of pics, but it also has my thoughts on cute vs food animals. Here's its link: Baby Peacocks in my Yard.

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Showing them footages of cruelty can open their eyes to how cruel humans can be, and greedy. And the saying "if slaughterhouse factories had glass walls, everyone would be vegetarian" is very true. People cannot be immune to any of this knowledge and not know where meat comes from. If we don't educate and show them how animals become processed food, it is equivalent to pulling a woolen blanket over their eyes.
Nicely said.
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