What are the foods that are high in "Complete" protien - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 07-25-2015, 02:00 AM
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What are the foods that are high in "Complete" protien

I am in to body building and looking for some food with High "complete" protein.

can someone suggest the best protein sources?

EX: Beans+Rice =full protein.
Rice+Lentis =full protein. etc...
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#2 Old 07-25-2015, 05:36 AM
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Quorn is complete.

Soya milk is supposed to be pretty good.

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#3 Old 07-25-2015, 05:51 AM
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Tofu
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#4 Old 07-25-2015, 05:55 AM
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Quinoa?

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#5 Old 07-25-2015, 05:58 AM
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All vegetarian food.

My usual answer: I have never heard a convincing reason to eat meat.
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#6 Old 07-25-2015, 06:33 AM
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Legumes + grains or nuts and seeds (red beans and rice, rice and lentils, rice and black-eyed peas, hummus--garbanzo beans and sesame seeds)

Grains + legumes (peanut butter and bread, barley and lentil soup, corn tortilla and beans)

Vegetables + Legumes, or grains, or nuts and seeds (tofu and broccoli with almonds, spinach salad with pine nuts and kidney beans)

Nuts and seeds + Legumes ( lentil soup with slivered almonds, sesame seeds with mixed bean salad)

I took a college nutrition course 2 years ago (I'm a nutrition minor) and this is straight from my textbook.
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#7 Old 07-25-2015, 07:12 AM
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Thank everyone!

I do not suppose Oats are a complete source of protein?
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#8 Old 07-25-2015, 08:15 AM
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Quote:
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Thank everyone!

I do not suppose Oats are a complete source of protein?
Oats are a great protein source. You don't have to have "complete" protein at every meal, it adds up over time.

I'm assuming you want some good protein to eat after a workout? My son sometimes uses oatmeal for this, adds peanut butter sometimes, or soymilk. Or a smoothie with protein powder: he likes the hemp or pea types. Or in a hurry, he will have a clif bar or two. Also loves rice and beans, or hummus and whole wheat pita.
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#9 Old 07-25-2015, 08:51 AM
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Here's info on protein from a vegan registered dietitian, Jack Norris: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein

Particularly, this table: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein#table3 - it lists the amino acid contents of most vegan protein sources. As he explains, lysine is usually the limiting amino acid in vegan diets, so you'll want to focus on protein sources with plenty of lysine (legumes and a few others).
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#10 Old 07-25-2015, 09:24 AM
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Nice links, runnerveggie!
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#11 Old 07-25-2015, 09:28 AM
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These protein-rich plant foods have excellent amino acid ratios, all by themselves ("complete protein"):

Black beans: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4284/2

Dry split peas: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4354/2

Quinoa: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...-pasta/10352/2


As you said, beans and grains have amino acid profiles that complement each other. Note that it's not necessary to eat these foods at the same time; your body can gather and assemble amino acids from foods eaten throughout the day. Here are supporting quotes from reputable organizations:


From the United States Department of Agriculture:

“Protein needs can easily be met by eating a variety of plant-based foods. Combining different protein sources in the same meal is not necessary.”
Link to this statement: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy...egetarian.html


From the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

“Is it true that complementary proteins must be eaten together to count as a complete protein source? In the past, it was thought that these complementary proteins needed to be eaten at the same meal for your body to use them together. Now studies show that your body can combine complementary proteins that are eaten within the same day”
Link to this statement: http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyon...s/protein.html


Please note that ALL beans and grains contain ALL essential amino acids, though they may have less-than-optimal ratios of those amino acids. If you eat enough calories on a whole-foods vegan diet (beans, grains, fruits, vegetables), then you will get enough of every essential amino acid. I do understand that you are interested in a higher protein intake, so it makes sense for you to try to optimize protein intake through complementary foods and "complete proteins".

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 07-25-2015 at 11:05 AM.
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#12 Old 07-25-2015, 09:38 AM
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Thank everyone!

I do not suppose Oats are a complete source of protein?
If you're still wondering, 100g of oats (raw) gives you...



So it's a complete protein source, as in, it contains all the essential amino acids. But like someone else said, almost all plant foods contain almost all the amino acids. You just need to eat the right amounts in order to get 100% of everything.
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#13 Old 07-25-2015, 09:52 AM
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From what I've heard, the complete protien thing is a myth perpetuated by constantly bring circulated as fact.
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#14 Old 07-25-2015, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rasitha.wijesekera View Post
From what I've heard, the complete protien thing is a myth perpetuated by constantly bring circulated as fact.
There is such a thing, but it's not necessary to eat complete protein within a single meal. If you eat rice at some point in the day and then beans later on, it still counts.
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#15 Old 07-25-2015, 11:50 AM
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Keep in mind that the OP is bodybuilding.
Bodybuilders tend to aim for more than the normally needed quantity of the requisite amino acids, even when calculated on a caloric basis. So while eating predominantly whole foods will be enough for other people it doesnt automatically fulfill the criteria for a bodybuilder.
Cron-o-meter is great for calculating the combined protein profile of meals or days, but for a quick glance at individual foods I use the search function on NutritionData. It has a little graphic pane for the essential amino acid scores so you can quickly see how a food item stands. The search results are organized poorly so it helps to add in extra words like raw or usda to get the list of results short.
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#16 Old 07-25-2015, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rasitha.wijesekera View Post
From what I've heard, the complete protien thing is a myth perpetuated by constantly bring circulated as fact.
what do you think is the myth?

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#17 Old 07-25-2015, 05:15 PM
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what do you think is the myth?

http://www.forksoverknives.com/the-m...ntary-protein/
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#18 Old 07-25-2015, 06:48 PM
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I kinda agree with it being a myth. Not because I don't believe you need all of those amino acids, but because where do you draw the line?

From the oat example there you get 37% of your daily protein and the only essential below 37% is lysine at 31%......so oats are slightly lysine deficient if all you do is get barely your recommended amount. That depends though, because I have my protein set at 56g per day. For me, if I get 100% of my protein req my lysine is at 106% and everything else is higher.

So are oats a complete protein? If I personally meet my req I get everything I need...mikka does not, but only just barely and eating like an extra 20g or whatever would per them over.



Then what about something like broccoli? Using my minimum of 56g/day again 2kg of broccoli contains 101% of my daily req, but only 90% of my leucine. Is 90% high enough?...it's so close, and everything else is over 100%......just 10% more broccoli and I get all of them. Someone who was trying to get 62g of protein a day would meet their essential minimum once they meet their total minimum.


So what is a complete protein? I have no idea. Every single food I've ever looked at has at least some of all the essential amino acids, though with something like zucchini I would personally need to eat 8 kilograms of it to meet all my essentials with my total being 163%. That's a lot, but it still completes my proteins. So is the line actually some sort of protein density thing? /shrug
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#19 Old 07-25-2015, 07:48 PM
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The real irony is that there is a food that contains protein lacking an essential amino acid.
Its gelatin, the boiled skin of animals.
Take that omnis
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#20 Old 07-26-2015, 09:44 PM
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Thanks all!!

So do we have to eat two food with partial protein on the same day for the body to get the complete protein? can't be late than that?
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#21 Old 07-28-2015, 06:58 AM
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Thanks all!!

So do we have to eat two food with partial protein on the same day for the body to get the complete protein? can't be late than that?

Mainstream health organizations state that complementary, non-ideal-amino-ratio foods should be eaten on the same day. Also, every mainstream vegetarian organization recommends that people eat both legumes AND whole grains (or starchy vegetables), every day. You can verify this by looking at the nutrition guides published by these vegetarian groups:

Mercy for Animals vegetarian guide: http://www.mercyforanimals.org/vsg.pdf

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine vegetarian guide: https://www.pcrm.org/health/diets/vs...ur-food-groups

Vegetarian Society of the UK vegetarian guide: https://www.vegsoc.org/eatwellplate


Having said this, I can tell you that I've often had days where I've eaten only grains, with no beans/legumes at all - it's never seemed to hurt me. However, I'm a slender guy. As a bodybuilder, you are interested in optimizing your protein intake.
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 07-28-2015 at 07:00 AM.
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