Why not turning vegan ? Reasons to stay a vegetarian - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 102Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 04-20-2015, 10:38 AM
Chaotic Vegetarian
 
Ad Elie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Orléans, France
Posts: 173
Why not turning vegan ? Reasons to stay a vegetarian

I've been a vegetarian for around 6 years now. I feel concerned with animal condition and environment.

I'm more and more considering a shift towards veganism but some things are still bothering me, like the fact that I heal myself on honey in the winter, the prohibitive price of milk subs (I drink soy but don't like it when it's too often) or the comfort of home-knitted wool. Oh and and also I'm a cheese-eating surrender monkey (and subs are so expensive that I haven't even tried them yet).

I know those reasons are selfish but, hey, we're on the vegetarian forum ! So I'd like to know your reasons for not turning vegan (yet). I don't need the reasons why we should turn vegan because they're found on basically all the other threads of veggie boards

If this thread is not adapted to this forum, please tell it and I'll stop with it without feeling offended


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Bon appétit !
Ad Elie is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 04-20-2015, 10:47 AM
Herbivorous Urchin
 
River's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ad Elie View Post
If this thread is not adapted to this forum, please tell it and I'll stop with it without feeling offended
This is the exact right place for this thread, you're okay.

Quote:
"You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
River is offline  
#3 Old 04-20-2015, 11:38 AM
Veggie Regular
 
jessandreia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: ON, Canada
Posts: 1,616
I eat vegan most of the time (I'd say at least 98%), but if I am somewhere where I have no vegan options, I will allow myself to have food that may have dairy or egg in it. That doesn't happen often at all though, and if I can bring vegan food with me to eat, I will.
I would rather eat something with egg or/and dairy in it than pass out from hunger.

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge


Last edited by jessandreia; 04-20-2015 at 11:53 AM.
jessandreia is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 04-20-2015, 02:18 PM
Don't Eat Animals.
 
Vegan Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,291
My stumbling block from veg to vegan was cheese.....'till I realized how I could live without it.

Bottom line.....do what lets you sleep at night.

All animals should be respected & should have the ability to lead a natural & enjoyable life. This means not eating them, or abusing them in any way.
Vegan Dave is offline  
#5 Old 04-21-2015, 12:35 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 4,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegan Dave View Post
Bottom line.....do what lets you sleep at night.
Very good advice because only the individual knows their own circumstances and so knows what pressures they are under.
leedsveg is offline  
#6 Old 04-21-2015, 01:21 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Shallot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 437
Well for me this is all about health and staying healthy (lots of chronic conditions - of which three were improved by moving away from meat, which allowed me to improve other aspects of my life etc.) So from a strictly nutritional point of view it was easier to switch to vegetarianism. I am moving towards more and more vegan food but keeping a very strict eye on my general health - and making sure I feed myself as optimally as possible.

So for me it's about health first and foremost. Vegetarianism improved my health dramatically and I'd be happy to stay vegetarian but milk seems to be a bit of a problem for me to digest.
Shallot is offline  
#7 Old 04-22-2015, 03:11 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
I live rurally, and vegetarianism isn't very common here. Veganism might alienate me from my community.

Just going meatless is already kinda radical where I am. I do consider vegans to be on the right side of the issue morally, but I do have to live my life, and vegetarianism is working for me right now.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#8 Old 04-22-2015, 09:54 PM
Veggie Regular
 
mecanna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: North Mississippi
Posts: 373
I'm currently a vegan, but maybe my experience can be helpful?

I was pescatarian, not veggie, for a long time purely out of fear. I was afraid of my family's reaction, of how my friends would react. After becoming veggie, I phased out eggs and all dairy products except cheese.

I loved cheese. Eating cheese kept others from hassling me too much about my veggie diet. I can't lie- it was also my favorite food.

Then I suddenly developed an intolerance to one of the dairy proteins. I lost 20 pounds- very bad because my average weight is around 105. I was exhausted and in extreme pain.

Had I not developed an allergy, I might still be eating dairy cheese. I was forced to take a long, hard look at my dietary choices.

But we need a happy ending to the story! I'm pleased with how everything turned out.
mecanna is offline  
#9 Old 04-23-2015, 04:42 AM
Beginner
 
Rad14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 155
No chance!

I've been Vegetarian for almost 32 years, and though I admire Vegans, where I live, I could never be one!
When I go out for a meal with friends or family, the local hotels and restaurants have just about heard of
vegetarians and offer maybe 2 or 3 choices. I could never be vegan here as I would starve -that's the bottom line!

Even with friends and family silence falls when I order, and they all look at me as if I came from Mars. Could you
imagine the reaction if I started trying to explain veganism to them? Apart from the fact, restaurants and hotels here
don't cater AT ALL for vegans. BTW, I live in Northern Ireland.
Rad14 is offline  
#10 Old 04-23-2015, 09:23 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Jasminedesi16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: philadelphia
Posts: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rad14 View Post
I've been Vegetarian for almost 32 years, and though I admire Vegans, where I live, I could never be one!
When I go out for a meal with friends or family, the local hotels and restaurants have just about heard of
vegetarians and offer maybe 2 or 3 choices. I could never be vegan here as I would starve -that's the bottom line!

Even with friends and family silence falls when I order, and they all look at me as if I came from Mars. Could you
imagine the reaction if I started trying to explain veganism to them? Apart from the fact, restaurants and hotels here
don't cater AT ALL for vegans. BTW, I live in Northern Ireland.
I know exactly how you feel Rad, I know some places here that have absolutely no vegan options and when I ask no cheese or sour cream they look at me like I just came from outer space.
Vegan Dave likes this.
Jasminedesi16 is offline  
#11 Old 04-23-2015, 09:40 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 5
I've only been a vegetarian for a year, but have definitely moved away from eggs and dairy as well... but more because I don't like them than anything.

I am moving toward a "vegan" diet, but I don't have a vegan mindset, so I will not call myself a vegan no matter what I do or don't eat. I disagree with the way cattle and chickens are handled and used in big factory farm settings, but I've owned both dairy goats and chickens before that were very well taken care of, and I really don't see anything wrong with using the products they produce since they'll just go to waste otherwise. Hens will lay an egg every day, and goats (and cattle) can produce more milk than their offspring need. I feel the same way about wool (sheep NEED to be trimmed of wool or it just keeps piling up on them). I also am all about second hand leather. I hate the thought of an animal who has given their life already to go to waste, so I see nothing wrong with buying leather from thrift stores, or holding on to leather from before you become vegan.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mod post. If anybody wants to challenge any of the points made in this post, I will move this post (and the challenging post) to the Compost Heap where the sub-discussion can continue. Leedsveg.
Jue35 and Ladyjay like this.

Last edited by leedsveg; 04-23-2015 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Moderator intervention
anonyx is offline  
#12 Old 04-23-2015, 02:08 PM
Chaotic Vegetarian
 
Ad Elie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Orléans, France
Posts: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonyx View Post
I've only been a vegetarian for a year, but have definitely moved away from eggs and dairy as well... but more because I don't like them than anything.

I am moving toward a "vegan" diet, but I don't have a vegan mindset, so I will not call myself a vegan no matter what I do or don't eat. I disagree with the way cattle and chickens are handled and used in big factory farm settings, but I've owned both dairy goats and chickens before that were very well taken care of, and I really don't see anything wrong with using the products they produce since they'll just go to waste otherwise. Hens will lay an egg every day, and goats (and cattle) can produce more milk than their offspring need. I feel the same way about wool (sheep NEED to be trimmed of wool or it just keeps piling up on them). I also am all about second hand leather. I hate the thought of an animal who has given their life already to go to waste, so I see nothing wrong with buying leather from thrift stores, or holding on to leather from before you become vegan.

[/B]
So you have no problems using animal byproducts. May I ask if you eat stuff with gelatin in it ? As it's made with bones and is not meat per se. Personnaly I use wool and leather (though I felt weird last time I changed my watch wristband) but I don't eat the gelatin. I'm not sure about what is really coherent in our behaviour and that's why I started this thread

BTW I've milked rescued goats, they seemed peaceful and it really was an amazing experience.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Bon appétit !
Ad Elie is offline  
#13 Old 04-23-2015, 05:24 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 5
I try to avoid gelatin, but if I can't find a reasonably priced pill without a gelatin capsule I'll take it anyway. I guess I'm lenient but I'll try to avoid where I can. Plus I have dogs that I feed normal dog food to of that counts
anonyx is offline  
#14 Old 04-23-2015, 07:57 PM
Veggie Regular
 
rasitha.wijesekera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 551
I would like to point out that, even if you don't label yourself as vegan, you don't have to eat all the dairy and eggs you see. You can try to avoid them whenever you can, and buy ones from local farms (which should be less cruel than factory farms)
Tom, dormouse, River and 2 others like this.
rasitha.wijesekera is offline  
#15 Old 04-24-2015, 03:59 AM
Chaotic Vegetarian
 
Ad Elie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Orléans, France
Posts: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by rasitha.wijesekera View Post
I would like to point out that, even if you don't label yourself as vegan, you don't have to eat all the dairy and eggs you see. You can try to avoid them whenever you can, and buy ones from local farms (which should be less cruel than factory farms)
Sure, I'm moderating my dairy products intakes and trying to replace them ---mmmh soy hot chocolate with hazelnut ! Though living in a non vegan-friendly town and on a tight budget makes it harder. Also living with a very satisfied cheese-loving person (whom I turned vegetarian ).


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Bon appétit !
Ad Elie is offline  
#16 Old 04-24-2015, 04:36 AM
Veggie Regular
 
runnerveggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,862
I'm certain this thread will resonate with a lot of people. I know that I thought I couldn't live without cheese, especially since I live in a very dairy-obsessed area. There is no reason you have to embrace all aspects of veganism, but you can still reduce animal suffering. For example, you can still eat cheese, but reduce the amount. You can cut out eggs. You can start incorporating alternatives to wool in a few of your knitting projects. You can make changes to your diet at home to reduce animal products, but still eat lacto-ovo vegetarian at restaurants or social gatherings. There are so many options.

I consider myself vegan, but I still avoid an all-or-nothing approach. Like you, I feed my dog regular dog food, and I'll take gelatin capsules when necessary. Some foods have trace amounts of dairy or eggs (bread is a big offender), and I don't put too much effort into avoiding those unless I'm grocery shopping and have the time to read labels.

Good luck in finding the options that work best for you!
runnerveggie is offline  
#17 Old 04-25-2015, 04:03 AM
adapt. evolve. become
 
Pirate Huntress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,374
For me it was cheese and greek yogurt but I always had guilt when eating non-vegan, so I stopped.
Tom and dormouse like this.
Pirate Huntress is offline  
#18 Old 04-25-2015, 04:49 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 14
I agree with the things some of the the users have said above. Try not to put yourself in a 'box'. Don't be so hard on yourself and very slowly try and reduce the amount of eggs, cheese(I'm a mahoosive cheese lover so I know how you feel ) and find alternatives. It will take time so take it a step at a time!
Maim56 is offline  
#19 Old 04-28-2015, 07:00 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Denver
Posts: 17
OP, don't beat yourself up about it. You may not be total vegan, but you are causing less harm than those who eat typical diets. There's a saying that is appropriate here: The perfect is the enemy of the good.

I'm mostly vegan myself (like jessandreia, I do the best I can but sometimes there are no good options), but it really ticks me off the way some vegans are harder on vegetarians who haven't gone all the way than to people who haven't made any changes at all and eat typical diets.
leedsveg and jessandreia like this.
Dorsai is offline  
#20 Old 04-28-2015, 04:56 PM
Not such a Beginner ;)
 
LedBoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorsai View Post
OP, don't beat yourself up about it. You may not be total vegan, but you are causing less harm than those who eat typical diets. There's a saying that is appropriate here: The perfect is the enemy of the good.

I'm mostly vegan myself (like jessandreia, I do the best I can but sometimes there are no good options), but it really ticks me off the way some vegans are harder on vegetarians who haven't gone all the way than to people who haven't made any changes at all and eat typical diets.
I don't really see examples of that, tbh.

I do see meat-eaters being jerks to veg*ns constantly though.
Tom and Dorsai like this.
LedBoots is offline  
#21 Old 04-28-2015, 04:59 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: SE USA
Posts: 290
it took me forever to get off cheese. finally i did it.

i sympathize with cheese addicts. i really wish that there was a good substitute for it.

but i honestly think i am better off without it, to say nothing of the cows.
Tom likes this.
cuberail is offline  
#22 Old 04-29-2015, 05:51 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Denver
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
I don't really see examples of that, tbh.

I do see meat-eaters being jerks to veg*ns constantly though.
Yes, I completely agree with you there. I see that much much much more often than any vegetarian/vegan being preachy to non-vegetarians.

"Don't know what they did to those baby calves but they sure turned out delicious, hur hur."

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat, ha ha."

"I'm going to eat twice as much meat to make up for you, LOL."
LedBoots likes this.
Dorsai is offline  
#23 Old 04-29-2015, 06:06 AM
Veggie Regular
 
mecanna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: North Mississippi
Posts: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorsai View Post
Yes, I completely agree with you there. I see that much much much more often than any vegetarian/vegan being preachy to non-vegetarians.

"Don't know what they did to those baby calves but they sure turned out delicious, hur hur."

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat, ha ha."

"I'm going to eat twice as much meat to make up for you, LOL."
I have a few rude replies to these:

Baby humans turn out delicious when cooked that way, too!

I agree, that's why I think human overpopulation can solve the world's hunger crisis. We're made of meat, after all.

Don't you think a quick, painless suicide would be better?
Tom likes this.
mecanna is offline  
#24 Old 05-03-2015, 08:37 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
Posts: 34
This is definitely an issue I have been struggling with more lately. I have decided not to try and cram myself into the vegan box for a number of reasons. In no particular order they are:

* I have to eat a GF diet. Not because I choose to, because my body tries to kill me if I eat gluten. This is already a very restrictive and difficult way to eat without adding too many other restrictions on top. Also, it is virtually impossible to make any decent GF baked goods without eggs.

* I have a fantastic egg source. My friend has a small organic farm, her flock of 25 chickens spend their days roaming the farm, eating bugs and kitchen scraps and being chickens. When they are old and stop laying they get to live out the rest of their natural lives with their flock. No culling, no cages, no beak trimming. And she drops eggs off on my porch once a week for $5/dozen.

* I knit. It really is what I do. I learned when I was 4 sitting on my Grandma's knee and I've never stopped. I also spin and weave. Wool is an integral part of my life.

* I have messed up feet. What does this have to do with veganism? Shoes. Even after surgeries and orthotics I still require extremely good quality and expensive shoes with are pretty much always leather.

* We have a BCSPCA approved cheese farm not too far from here. I have visited with the kids and they are the only BCSPCA approved dairy-farm in the province. I am actually just about to eat a GF bun with some brie from there in a few minutes. Other than that I could do without cheese and do buy Daiya shreds for things like tacos and pizza.

* Our local diary co-op which produces most of the dairy we eat on the island is actually quite good. It is not unusual to drive around this area and pass a few small farms that contribute to the co-op and see cows grazing or just lying in the grass soaking in the sun. It's hard to get around the calves to the slaughter issue though so I do limit dairy mostly to cheese and butter from local sources.

* I have a history of eating disorders. As soon as I get too restrictive my eating gets really disordered as I strive for a level of perfection that may not exist. I have done it many times and would like to avoid doing it again.

* I have a dog. That wonderful creature eats 2 bowls of salmon and sweet potato food each day.

Ultimately I strive to minimize the overall impact of my life on other animals. I only purchase household products not tested on animals, I avoid leather whenever possible, I feed my dog salmon rather than chicken-based food as I feel there is somewhat less cruelty involved in fishing than in poultry farming... I do my best in as many small ways as I possibly can.
Poppi is offline  
#25 Old 05-10-2015, 02:55 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5
Except for eggs, which I buy locally so I know some of these chickens are living the good life, my diet is 99% vegan. I say 99% because like others have mentioned in this thread, I don't go out of my way to ensure that meals that I haven't prepared myself don't contain milk products.

Instagram: vegetarian_calisthenics
MikeFrans is offline  
#26 Old 05-16-2015, 07:42 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Joan Kennedy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Lovettsville, VA and Portland, OR
Posts: 1,983
I'm veggie, not vegan, but limit my dairy and egg to the occasional splurge. I just got back to the East Coast, driving mostly on I-70 after two months of wonderful and completely vegan cuisine in Oregon. After the drive, I have to say I don't see how people in the Midwest can follow a vegan diet when they eat out. So few vegetable dishes anywhere, and everything smothered in Kraft cheese. I could have used a phone app to find vegan-friendly places in larger towns, but I never seemed to hit the larger towns at mealtime. And I was sticking to the places I could get to without going too far off the highway.

I started my trip with tubs of hummus, a bag of pita and a bag of grapes. But by the time I was deep into the Heartland, all that was gone. Nearly all the Burger Kings had veggie burgers, which I ate as a half-measure. The one time I drank a strawberry milkshake I got a weird allergic reaction. Just my face, something between an hours-long niacine flush and a temporary massive sunburn. No more BK strawberry shakes for me. It was pretty much Subway Veggie Delite (with very brown lettuce) for the rest of the drive. More and more, dumb or hostile remarks from meat-eaters just make me want to go, "Me, vegan? Sure, if it annoys you!"
Joan Kennedy is offline  
#27 Old 05-16-2015, 08:03 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
I am currently trying to eat as vegan as I can. Maybe that doesn't make me a vegan, but a striving vegetarian. I do have access to "happy eggs" but I am choosing to not eat them at this time.

I think we're all doing the best we can!
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#28 Old 05-16-2015, 09:21 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Joan Kennedy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Lovettsville, VA and Portland, OR
Posts: 1,983
Part of it is knowing our limits and doing our best within those limits. But some of us don't hold veganism as the ideal to which we aspire and fall short. I'm not opposed philosophically to all forms of animal exploitation. Heart surgeons practice (or used to) on cats early in their training, and I might need a heart surgeon some day who did that, or a loved one might. And some venomous snakes are bound to be kept in captivity for anti-venom. Orchards are pollinated with trucked-in bees. I distinguish between battery hens and pastured or pet hens. And so forth. I try to be consistent as possible and to stay true to my own moral compass, not someone else's.

Some vegetarians are transitioning to veganism, more and more from the looks of it, and that's great. When a friend is doing that I'm completely supportive, and such friends appreciate my plant-based cooking. For background, my original motivation to step off meat was that the cowboys are destroying the earth, and for health I don't see any difference between my 95 percent plant-based diet and a fully vegan one. Animal justice is not what got me going, though I'm happy that my diet gives the critters a break. Not a break compared to a vegan lifestyle, but compared to my former diet. Many family members have spent time as vegans or vegetarians, but none of them kept it up as long (seven-plus years now) as I have so far, so I think I've hit on something that will work for the long term.
Shallot and Ad Elie like this.
Joan Kennedy is offline  
#29 Old 05-16-2015, 10:15 AM
Veggie Regular
 
runnerveggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joan Kennedy View Post
I'm veggie, not vegan, but limit my dairy and egg to the occasional splurge. I just got back to the East Coast, driving mostly on I-70 after two months of wonderful and completely vegan cuisine in Oregon. After the drive, I have to say I don't see how people in the Midwest can follow a vegan diet when they eat out. So few vegetable dishes anywhere, and everything smothered in Kraft cheese. I could have used a phone app to find vegan-friendly places in larger towns, but I never seemed to hit the larger towns at mealtime. And I was sticking to the places I could get to without going too far off the highway.
The midwest isn't just filled with greasy spoons. I'm not sure where you ate with the Kraft cheese...I really haven't seen that in a while and it sounds horrifying, but kind of typical for some of the "family" restaurants. It's too bad you couldn't hit up larger cities. Chicago has an almost overwhelming variety of vegan options. I've had good luck even in small towns -- it is certainly helpful to search for restaurants on my smart phone, although most of them wouldn't be listed in any vegan app. Ethnic foods like Chinese, Mexican, Indian and Thai often offer vegan options (you may have to do a little digging about ingredients like fish sauce, ghee or chicken broth), and chain restaurants are getting more and more vegan friendly too (Noodles and Company is a go-to quick weeknight dinner for me). I live in a mid-size city, and although I'm perpetually disappointed that we don't have an awesome all-vegan restaurant, there are plenty of vegan options at restaurants ranging from fast food to fancy.
no whey jose likes this.
runnerveggie is offline  
#30 Old 05-16-2015, 10:22 AM
Veggie Regular
 
ocrob37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 471
I am lucky because I have been lactose intolerant for a long time and now the thought of any dairy is so gross to me. I will say that I have made vegan mac and cheese and it was delicious. So, maybe I do like the taste of cheese a little, but it still grosses me out. LOL
ocrob37 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off