My stepdaughter and meat!! - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-21-2015, 05:01 PM
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My stepdaughter and meat!!

Hello! I'm new to the message boards. After today I knew I needed to find a supportive place and VENT! Let me start off by saying that I have been vegetarian for almost 5 years and am now transitioning into veganism. I have three children living with me. Two are my own and have chose to be vegetarian and have been for a year now.. the other is my stepdaughter who chose that she did not want to be vegetarian. We don't buy meat or have it in our home but when she goes to a Grandparents house or somewhere else she will eat meat if they have it. So tonight my daughter and I were having a conversation about meat and I decided to ask my stepdaughter why she chooses to eat meat after she knows what happens to the animals. She is only 8. She says "well they just taste so yummy." She wasn't saying it to be smart. So then I said.. some countries even eat cats and dogs. Would you eat a cat or dog? She says "no because they are so cute." So then I say.. "a cow is not cute? a pig? a chicken?" she says "i like all animals". I just don't understand.
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#2 Old 03-21-2015, 05:37 PM
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I understand it can be frustrating watching people eat meat, but there's really not much more you can do in that situation. She already eats vegetarian at home. Has she been near cows and pigs before? If not, take her on a trip to a farm sanctuary if you can. Maybe being closer to them would make her see those animals as cute as well.
Also, remember that when you were her age you ate meat and your reasons for doing so were probably also because it tastes good. Maybe she'll come around someday too.

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge


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#3 Old 03-22-2015, 01:32 AM
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Hello! I'm new to the message boards. After today I knew I needed to find a supportive place and VENT! Let me start off by saying that I have been vegetarian for almost 5 years and am now transitioning into veganism. I have three children living with me. Two are my own and have chose to be vegetarian and have been for a year now.. the other is my stepdaughter who chose that she did not want to be vegetarian. We don't buy meat or have it in our home but when she goes to a Grandparents house or somewhere else she will eat meat if they have it. So tonight my daughter and I were having a conversation about meat and I decided to ask my stepdaughter why she chooses to eat meat after she knows what happens to the animals. She is only 8. She says "well they just taste so yummy." She wasn't saying it to be smart. So then I said.. some countries even eat cats and dogs. Would you eat a cat or dog? She says "no because they are so cute." So then I say.. "a cow is not cute? a pig? a chicken?" she says "i like all animals". I just don't understand.

I agree with what the previous poster said, take her to a sanctuary. Let her see how cute farm animals can be.
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#4 Old 03-22-2015, 05:53 AM
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She is very young, and she sees her grandparents, her friends, and most other people eating meat, so it must seem normal to her. There are a few children's books that discuss vegetarianism and its ethics. She probably doesn't know any different, living in the meat-centric society we have.

It is tricky to tell a child about the ethics, since their thinking is a bit more black and white than adults'. You don't want to make her grandparents and classmates seem like monsters, or she's more likely to tune you out.
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#5 Old 03-22-2015, 06:12 AM
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She's eight.

I sort of feel like that needs to be reiterated.

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#6 Old 03-22-2015, 07:55 AM
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She's eight.

I sort of feel like that needs to be reiterated.

Yes well, still no harm in trying to guide her on the right path. I agree that she might not understand some issues. But you talk to her the way she understands.

Honestly though, I think when one is a child it's easy to instill morals and ethics with her rather than when she's an adult.
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#7 Old 03-22-2015, 08:07 AM
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Yes well, still no harm in trying to guide her on the right path. I agree that she might not understand some issues. But you talk to her the way she understands.

Honestly though, I think when one is a child it's easy to instill morals and ethics with her rather than when she's an adult.
I was referring to the OP.
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#8 Old 03-22-2015, 11:50 AM
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First of all, I hate the "cute" reference. Not everyone is "cute", and no one, human or non human should be treated according to "cuteness".

I love the idea of going to an animal sanctuary. Reinforcing the ideas of empathy for all creatures is also key.
How does she percieve those who are bullied? Is she one to offer help, or more likely to join the crowd?

An 8 year old is very unformed, but I do think you can see their tendencies and respond to them individually.

Have you looked at books that address vegetarian issues? like

https://www.vrg.org/family/Vegetaria...s_Booklist.pdf
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#9 Old 03-22-2015, 12:49 PM
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As someone who had (a very wonderful) stepparent, and who grew up to become a stepparent in turn, I get a vibe of "my kids are better/more compassionate than my stepdaughter" from your post. (That's based on the fact that you reference an eight year old who's living with you as your "stepdaughter" rather than as being one of your three children. My father (stepfather) never made reference to me as a "step" - I was his child, and I was only a bit younger than your daughter is now when he met me.)

Anyway, if I'm getting that vibe just from your post, I bet the child is too. Please don't differentiate between your biological children and your stepdaughter - no child deserves that.

As others have said, she's eight, living in a meat eating world. Please think of her as you do your other children, and deal with the meat eating accordingly.
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#10 Old 03-22-2015, 06:50 PM
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Thanks for your reply. However, you have no idea about my own personal life. This is not about my relationship with my stepdaughter.. thanks for your "help" though.
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#11 Old 03-22-2015, 06:54 PM
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Thank you everyone for the help. I do love the idea about taking her to a sanctuary. I feel like even though she is young she can understand because my other children are 5 and 7 and they have no problem with understanding.
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#12 Old 03-23-2015, 01:13 AM
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One question that came to mind while reading the OP:
mrsn, you have been a vegetarian for FIVE years.
You had plenty of time to think about it, making the transition in your own time and it has taken you these FIVE years to CHOOSE to transition to veganism.
Note bene: Transition.
You're not giving up everything non-vegan overnight!

Don't you think your daughter should have this same freedom?

Talking to her repeatedly about her diet DOES make her feel set apart from her "step sisters".
I grew up with a "step dad" who did not treat me very nice because my brother, his "own" son, had Down Syndrome and he kind of felt he had to make this up to him by giving him privileges over the other two children.
I became very sensitive to this to the point of asking "Björn wants this or that" when I wanted something, because I felt that he would instantly get whatever he asked while I had to beg or discuss endlessly.

The meat-eating issue would have told me, "hm, mom accepts everything my sisters/ brothers do and is very close to them, they share their eating preferences, and I am somehow wrong in my preferences = something is wrong with me AND my mom does not accept me the way I am!"
This would probably have me rebelling against her, just to prove (unconsciously) that she/ you *could not control all of my life*.

Please consider this point of view.

Give her time, do not rush her, do not >>preach<<. She will make her own decisions as a teen and forcing her to come around to YOUR view now might make her rebel as a teen, eating meat out of spite possibly.

Praise her for not eating meat at home, talk to her about why you eat vegetarian and the other people don't (they are not insensitive, they just have not thought about this when you did, and keep in mind that it took you FIVE years to decide to go vegan).

I would give her these five years as well!
Let her >>transition<< as well, don't force her to do it overnight, make it easy for her by praising her when she eats less meat or chooses vegetarian options at other people's houses.

Don't alienate her from you over something "minor". The "something minor" is NOT supporting animal suffering with her eating habits, but doing what friends and grandparents do everyday.
Let her come to the realization what meat is in her own time and let her decide if and how fast she wants to cut on it or give it up in her own time.


Meanwhile, please, make her feel loved the same way as your biological children and don't make her question her value because she unthinkingly does the same as grans ands friends!

Best wishes from
Fidi
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#13 Old 03-23-2015, 04:55 AM
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Hello! I'm new to the message boards. After today I knew I needed to find a supportive place and VENT! Let me start off by saying that I have been vegetarian for almost 5 years and am now transitioning into veganism. I have three children living with me. Two are my own and have chose to be vegetarian and have been for a year now.. the other is my stepdaughter who chose that she did not want to be vegetarian. We don't buy meat or have it in our home but when she goes to a Grandparents house or somewhere else she will eat meat if they have it. So tonight my daughter and I were having a conversation about meat and I decided to ask my stepdaughter why she chooses to eat meat after she knows what happens to the animals. She is only 8. She says "well they just taste so yummy." She wasn't saying it to be smart. So then I said.. some countries even eat cats and dogs. Would you eat a cat or dog? She says "no because they are so cute." So then I say.. "a cow is not cute? a pig? a chicken?" she says "i like all animals". I just don't understand.
She's 8.

I take it from your post that you ate meat and dairy aged 8 - what was your reasoning behind it?

Further to this by not buying her meat you are essentially forcing her to be vegetarian at home against her will - yet you are disappointed and confused she eats meat at every opportunity when she's out of your home?

I can only imagine your reaction to anyone being force fed meat while choosing to be vegetarian.

I understand you want to show her the "better" way but you must be aware that you're being hypocritical and unfair in your attempts to do so with an 8 year old?!

Why give the kids the "choice" to become vegetarian or not then not respect the answers when it went against your thoughts?

In my opinion, I understand where you are coming from but your being unfair, unreasonable and downright hypocritical.
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#14 Old 03-23-2015, 08:26 AM
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She's 8.

I take it from your post that you ate meat and dairy aged 8 - what was your reasoning behind it?

Further to this by not buying her meat you are essentially forcing her to be vegetarian at home against her will - yet you are disappointed and confused she eats meat at every opportunity when she's out of your home?

I can only imagine your reaction to anyone being force fed meat while choosing to be vegetarian.

I understand you want to show her the "better" way but you must be aware that you're being hypocritical and unfair in your attempts to do so with an 8 year old?!

Why give the kids the "choice" to become vegetarian or not then not respect the answers when it went against your thoughts?

In my opinion, I understand where you are coming from but your being unfair, unreasonable and downright hypocritical.
Although I agree with most of your post, I have to point out that serving vegetarian food to a meat-eating child is in no way analogous to force-feeding meat to a vegetarian child. The kid isn't against vegetables and grains for ethical reasons-- she would just prefer to eat meat along with it. A better analogy would be refusing to serve dessert to a kid who wants cookies. It's a bit nitpicky but I felt it should be said.
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#15 Old 03-23-2015, 09:38 AM
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She's 8.

I take it from your post that you ate meat and dairy aged 8 - what was your reasoning behind it?

Further to this by not buying her meat you are essentially forcing her to be vegetarian at home against her will - yet you are disappointed and confused she eats meat at every opportunity when she's out of your home?

I can only imagine your reaction to anyone being force fed meat while choosing to be vegetarian.

I understand you want to show her the "better" way but you must be aware that you're being hypocritical and unfair in your attempts to do so with an 8 year old?!

Why give the kids the "choice" to become vegetarian or not then not respect the answers when it went against your thoughts?

In my opinion, I understand where you are coming from but your being unfair, unreasonable and downright hypocritical.

Uhh.. not really, If she's doing something wrong(you can argue whether eating meat is right or wrong) it's your responsibility to make sure your child understands it's wrong and if necessary insist that she do the right thing.
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#16 Old 03-23-2015, 10:26 AM
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Although I agree with most of your post, I have to point out that serving vegetarian food to a meat-eating child is in no way analogous to force-feeding meat to a vegetarian child. The kid isn't against vegetables and grains for ethical reasons-- she would just prefer to eat meat along with it. A better analogy would be refusing to serve dessert to a kid who wants cookies. It's a bit nitpicky but I felt it should be said.
I somewhat see what you are getting at.

Let's say a child says they wish to be vegetarian - you being a hardline meatist are appauled and you only serve meat in your home so it's bacon or nothing!

Whether such people exist or not is irrelevant to the point - my above example would horrify Vegetarians and Vegans alike. So is the vegetarian/vegan equivalent winning over meat eaters or poisoning them against it? I would say many meat eaters find it equally abhorrent as the vegetarians/vegans do. Whether you believe there is a clause that gets vegetarians/vegans a pass, I don't know, I personally think respecting others wishes is important if you wish others to respect yours.

If you think the parent has the right to serve the child a strict diet which may depending on skill be deficient then fair enough, the child in question though in not the biological child of the guardian, I would ask if the childs biological parent is aware of this situation?! Further to this I'd ask if you don't have meat at home but your biological children only became vegetarian in the last year - what did "you" do previously?

There's lots more to think about with such a question than one persons perceived righteousness concerning a philosophy, if you scratch it a little what's underneath could be far more sinister - My suspicions are just that, based purely on what the OP stated, whether it was intentional and conscious or not I don't know and couldn't possibly know, I merely think the OP is the things I stated in my original post as a result and should reassess their position and actions going forward.
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#17 Old 03-23-2015, 10:33 AM
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Uhh.. not really, If she's doing something wrong(you can argue whether eating meat is right or wrong) it's your responsibility to make sure your child understands it's wrong and if necessary insist that she do the right thing.
The very fact that you concede that the issue is contentious means that the child isn't doing something wrong and thus the OP is wrong in attempts to manipulate and force the child to be something the child is not.

I could think homosexuality is wrong and I'm backed up by the word of God in scripture, everyone in my village believes homosexuality is wrong too - Do I as a parent have the right to force my child does the right thing and becomes hetrosexual?

I ask this hypothetical question to highlight an issue with your logic - I completely understand that their is situations where what you said is completely true however life is full of grey area's between black and white!
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#18 Old 03-23-2015, 10:48 AM
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You say you have three children living with "me", I'm curious to know where the father of your stepdaughter stands in all this? Is he living with you too? Does he take issue with your stepdaughter eating meat? Does he support her choice to choose to do so?

I would be careful of making a point of differences between, and thereby generating conflict between, your stepdaughter and her new family (yourself and her step siblings) and her blood relatives that she has known and presumably trusted since birth (father and grandparents).

Emphasise similarities rather than differences. I'm sure you want the children in your home to feel close and connected. Do try to have empathy for this child's, probably emotionally ruled, choices. I expect she wants to be loved and accepted by Grandpa and Grandma and food is a huge part of our early bonding experience.

At least give this child the benefit of the same duration of time to choose to adapt as you gave your own. After all you were vegetarian for five years, and your children have only been vegetarian for one year. Why did it take them so long to "understand"? Rhetorical question.
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#19 Old 03-23-2015, 11:45 AM
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My daughter originally wanted to be the family's first vegan, but I told her "You're a growing teen, and I don't know how to ensure you will get enough vegetable protein, and I can't take that on as a project right now. A few years later when I decided to be a vegan, she wanted to be vegan at home but omnivorous out with friends to keep life uncomplicated.

I respected it. I think if you try to push it on your step-daughter, it might alienate her or cause her to dig her heels in. Maybe if she senses the grace and space to make her own choice, who knows what might happen later?

I'm glad that shes willing to play along at your home without complaining or begging for alternatives.

I appreciated that my daughter was willing to go along to get along, and she was a good-sport about it too.
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#20 Old 03-23-2015, 12:56 PM
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I somewhat see what you are getting at.

Let's say a child says they wish to be vegetarian - you being a hardline meatist are appauled and you only serve meat in your home so it's bacon or nothing!

Whether such people exist or not is irrelevant to the point - my above example would horrify Vegetarians and Vegans alike. So is the vegetarian/vegan equivalent winning over meat eaters or poisoning them against it? I would say many meat eaters find it equally abhorrent as the vegetarians/vegans do. Whether you believe there is a clause that gets vegetarians/vegans a pass, I don't know, I personally think respecting others wishes is important if you wish others to respect yours.

If you think the parent has the right to serve the child a strict diet which may depending on skill be deficient then fair enough, the child in question though in not the biological child of the guardian, I would ask if the childs biological parent is aware of this situation?! Further to this I'd ask if you don't have meat at home but your biological children only became vegetarian in the last year - what did "you" do previously?

There's lots more to think about with such a question than one persons perceived righteousness concerning a philosophy, if you scratch it a little what's underneath could be far more sinister - My suspicions are just that, based purely on what the OP stated, whether it was intentional and conscious or not I don't know and couldn't possibly know, I merely think the OP is the things I stated in my original post as a result and should reassess their position and actions going forward.
It's not at all comparable.

The hypothetical situation you posed is horrific to vegetarians because we have a strong moral opposition to the eating of meat. Forcing a vegetarian child to eat meat or starve would be forcing her to do something that her conscience tells her is unethical. (Not to mention that an all-meat diet would be severely lacking in nutrients!)

Serving an omnivorous child a vegetarian meal involves no such ethical coercion. Omnivores can eat, and enjoy eating, all manner of vegetarian food. If the mother is morally opposed to buying and cooking meat, I see no reason why she should feel obligated to go against her code of ethics to serve her child something that isn't a dietary necessity.

That said, I don't think it's right to pressure the child about the meat she chooses to eat away from home. Vegetarianism is an ethical choice that everyone must decide for themselves. As a parent, all you can do is offer education and resources, and support your child whatever decision she makes.
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#21 Old 03-23-2015, 01:22 PM
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It's not at all comparable.

The hypothetical situation you posed is horrific to vegetarians because we have a strong moral opposition to the eating of meat. Forcing a vegetarian child to eat meat or starve would be forcing her to do something that her conscience tells her is unethical. (Not to mention that an all-meat diet would be severely lacking in nutrients!)

Serving an omnivorous child a vegetarian meal involves no such ethical coercion. Omnivores can eat, and enjoy eating, all manner of vegetarian food. If the mother is morally opposed to buying and cooking meat, I see no reason why she should feel obligated to go against her code of ethics to serve her child something that isn't a dietary necessity.

That said, I don't think it's right to pressure the child about the meat she chooses to eat away from home. Vegetarianism is an ethical choice that everyone must decide for themselves. As a parent, all you can do is offer education and resources, and support your child whatever decision she makes.
Don't get me wrong here - we're on the same page, reading different lines

Is it not unethical to give a child the choice then chose not to respect the decision? Is it not unethical to feed the child meals which the child does not want? I know my hypothetical has holes in it, she doesn't have to go against her code of ethics but constantly trying to mold the child into being a vegetarian by manipulation is unethical too.

As parents/guardians I accept that children should listen and follow what you believe to be best for them - it gets tricky with some subjects however and trickier still depending on other life factors i.e. step-daughter instead of daughter. For me vegetarian with money, eat meat at grandparents, don't eat sweets or drink fizzy juice full-stop - would be about as good as it gets without being a psycho about it. Try and give the child a full and varied diet of healthy, nutritious, tasty meals- snacks-drinks, so that when the child is older they can reassess the issue with a better informed mind as to the realities.
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#22 Old 03-23-2015, 02:35 PM
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Honestly, I think whatever the father says is being largely ignored as well. What does he think about all of this?

What involvement does her birth mother have?

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#23 Old 03-24-2015, 01:03 AM
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I could think homosexuality is wrong and I'm backed up by the word of God in scripture, everyone in my village believes homosexuality is wrong too - Do I as a parent have the right to force my child does the right thing and becomes hetrosexual?



I ask this hypothetical question to highlight an issue with your logic - I completely understand that their is situations where what you said is completely true however life is full of grey area's between black and white!

I actually don't think the issue is contentious. Eating meat is wrong.

We could take an example like this, if the child is being a bully to her friend who has two gay fathers, and she wants to keep bullying them, would you respect her wishes then? No.

I'd understand unwillingness to force the child to be a vegetarian against her will, but as far as I can see Its not like she demands meat and the parents are refusing it. She's somewhat indifferent.
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#24 Old 04-07-2015, 12:32 PM
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I was like that my whole life--a huge meat eater and I knew it was inhumane but I knew it was bad but I never felt "bad" about it and I never knew why..I just craved it
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#25 Old 04-09-2015, 02:48 AM
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I think Op should let her step daughter time to decide for herself as it took her five years to convert. She should treat all her children with equal love and care. Try to discuss with her about it according to her age not like an adult. As she must have a large influence of her grandparents on her, I don't think she is going to change her lifestyle very soon. You need to give her time and when she is old enough to decided for herself, she will surely make the right choice.
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#26 Old 04-09-2015, 10:55 AM
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As someone who had (a very wonderful) stepparent, and who grew up to become a stepparent in turn, I get a vibe of "my kids are better/more compassionate than my stepdaughter" from your post. (That's based on the fact that you reference an eight year old who's living with you as your "stepdaughter" rather than as being one of your three children. My father (stepfather) never made reference to me as a "step" - I was his child, and I was only a bit younger than your daughter is now when he met me.)

Anyway, if I'm getting that vibe just from your post, I bet the child is too. Please don't differentiate between your biological children and your stepdaughter - no child deserves that.

As others have said, she's eight, living in a meat eating world. Please think of her as you do your other children, and deal with the meat eating accordingly.
Please don't psychoanalyze the personal lives of others.
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She's 8.

I take it from your post that you ate meat and dairy aged 8 - what was your reasoning behind it?

Further to this by not buying her meat you are essentially forcing her to be vegetarian at home against her will - yet you are disappointed and confused she eats meat at every opportunity when she's out of your home?

I can only imagine your reaction to anyone being force fed meat while choosing to be vegetarian.

I understand you want to show her the "better" way but you must be aware that you're being hypocritical and unfair in your attempts to do so with an 8 year old?!

Why give the kids the "choice" to become vegetarian or not then not respect the answers when it went against your thoughts?

In my opinion, I understand where you are coming from but your being unfair, unreasonable and downright hypocritical.
Children should be able to choose what they eat?
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The very fact that you concede that the issue is contentious means that the child isn't doing something wrong and thus the OP is wrong in attempts to manipulate and force the child to be something the child is not.

I could think homosexuality is wrong and I'm backed up by the word of God in scripture, everyone in my village believes homosexuality is wrong too - Do I as a parent have the right to force my child does the right thing and becomes hetrosexual?

I ask this hypothetical question to highlight an issue with your logic - I completely understand that their is situations where what you said is completely true however life is full of grey area's between black and white!
Children should be able to choose what they eat?
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Originally Posted by Nora Williams View Post
I think Op should let her step daughter time to decide for herself as it took her five years to convert. She should treat all her children with equal love and care. Try to discuss with her about it according to her age not like an adult. As she must have a large influence of her grandparents on her, I don't think she is going to change her lifestyle very soon. You need to give her time and when she is old enough to decided for herself, she will surely make the right choice.
OP did not necessarily "take five years" to convert. She said she has been veg five years. There is a difference.

Also: Children should be able to choose what they eat? You do see that this is a problematic notion, yes?
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#27 Old 04-09-2015, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by erilol View Post
Please don't psychoanalyze the personal lives of others.

Children should be able to choose what they eat?

Children should be able to choose what they eat?

OP did not necessarily "take five years" to convert. She said she has been veg five years. There is a difference.

Also: Children should be able to choose what they eat? You do see that this is a problematic notion, yes?
It's the way the OP is separating her stepdaughter in a way that is the concern, and she states that their house IS meat free. The children don't choose what they eat there. Her stepdaughter however eats meat at other houses. If you haven't noticed, that is the norm.
The OP has only been a vegetarian for five years. She says she's transitioning to vegan. It's that she makes a point that her real daughters choose to be like her, and the stepdaughter chooses what she obiviously feels is the wrong choice. I don't wonder why. Being singled out in a family as different doesn't exactly make kids want to be like you.
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#28 Old 04-10-2015, 05:24 AM
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Keep hope for this child to become vegetarian. She's very young and lives with vegetarian children. Having kids and adults around her hinting to her that veg is a possibility, and growing up with them can only give her chances to develop moral and then choose by herself, maybe as a teen. Maybe you can try to cook a lot with her (and your other kids), so when she'll have to do it for herself she'll naturally make stuff you taught her. That's also a way to turn adults to veg. Giving them solutions before even saying there is a problem.


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#29 Old 04-12-2015, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
She is very young, and she sees her grandparents, her friends, and most other people eating meat, so it must seem normal to her. There are a few children's books that discuss vegetarianism and its ethics. She probably doesn't know any different, living in the meat-centric society we have.

It is tricky to tell a child about the ethics, since their thinking is a bit more black and white than adults'. You don't want to make her grandparents and classmates seem like monsters, or she's more likely to tune you out.
That's the kicker right there. When I was 8 I didn't know any better but I was even worse off than your step-daughter because both my parents were heavy meat eaters and literally told me straight up that cows, chickens, and pigs were made for us to eat by god himself and I lived in a very rural area with a 100 person population as well so I didn't have a chance.

Your step-daughter on the other hand does, I couldn't even consider Vegetarianism/Veganism until I got my own job but with you in her family she has an advantage and what I would do is cook fake meat for her and show her that animals can still survive yet she can still have the same taste as well.

I've only been on this diet for a year but I can safely say that I don't even hunger for a beef cheeseburger anymore, they smell overly strong and greasy. I'd honestly take a veggie burger with ketchup, lettuce, mustard and tomatoes anyday and I'm being completely honest which kind of scares me.

It scares me because I used to enjoy Cheeseburgers so much but I enjoy Veggie burgers the same, it feels sacrilegious.

Show her that your a great cook and are willing to accommodate to her tastes after giving her a tour of a local farm, that way she can have similar flavors with no deaths. Also, explain to the grandparents that she is your daughter and that they should respect your wishes by not feeding her the things she loves.

Damn this get's me emotional.
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