questioning veganism - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 05-28-2004, 06:22 PM
Veggie Regular
 
raylea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 248
Is it normal to question veganism?



So, I've been vegan for a good number of months now (after being ovo-lacto for years), and I really like the fact that no little animal lives have been sacrificed for me to eat. I've been very carelful to make sure that my diet is well balanced and full of wholesome, nutritious foods. But lately I have been feeling so deprived... Some of my favorite dairy-containing delectables have been incredibly appealing. It has taken all I have to restrain myself from eating the fresh pizza my omni family is eating for dinner. So tempting. I am also tired of agonizing over the tiny print on nutrition lables, not being able to go out for a normal meal with friends, and having to go out of the way to find something to eat when travelling.



Thoughts? Suggestions?



Is it okay to have the occasional non-vegan treat if I have a primarily plant-based diet?







Thanks.
raylea is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 05-28-2004, 06:39 PM
Veggie Regular
 
1vegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by raylea View Post

I am also tired of agonizing over the tiny print on nutrition lables, not being able to go out for a normal meal with friends, and having to go out of the way to find something to eat when travelling.



Thoughts? Suggestions?



Is it okay to have the occasional non-vegan treat if I have a primarily plant-based diet?







Thanks.



yes, it's tiring sometimes. The influence of big companies is enourmous.

You realize that when a kiosk tells you they would like to sell the vegan thingy I suggested, but the main holding won't allow small deliveries



If you think it's ok to have a non vegan treat, I guess it's ok.

Vegan isn't some book of rules you must follow.



I weind (sp) off from treats and other extra's like cookies that used to go with the coffee.
1vegan is offline  
#3 Old 05-28-2004, 06:41 PM
Veggie Regular
 
1vegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,440
This could be a phase you are going through, as for me it is easy to pick the right products.



I still check labels occasionally, but the normal stuff I buy including cookies and treats I can pick out without a problem.



I also got an emergency kit at the office.

Always a cookie or other treat for when there is something to celebrate.



But I'm lucky and most co-workers go to the hfs and ask there for the right stuff
1vegan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 05-28-2004, 06:44 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Formerbaboon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,201
Sometimes I will think to myself "Why Am I Doing This Again?", and then I will think "Oh Yeah, To Spare The Animals And The Earth".
Formerbaboon is offline  
#5 Old 05-28-2004, 06:46 PM
Administrator
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,873
Well I'd say the most important thing is to do what will allow you to make the biggest impact over time. If you need to ease up a bit in order to ensure that you won't get burnt out and quit then by all means do it.



Also, there are some pretty tasty treats out there and vegan replacements for a lot of your favorite foods. Especially if you're willing to order online. If there is something specific that you're craving I'm sure someone can give you suggestions.

VeggieBoards Alumni Facebook Group

If you're an old time VB'er stop by and say hi!


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Michael is offline  
#6 Old 05-28-2004, 08:39 PM
 
IamJen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,134
Any reduction in animal products consumed is a good one. For awhile, you might try a "don't sweat the small stuff" approach. That is, cut out liquid milk, cheese, eggs, etc. but don't fret over honey in your bread or unvegan vitamins in your cereal, that sort of thing. I know some people will disagree, but if it would help you from getting burnt out as Michael said, then it might be worth while.



Why is the family eating omni food? If you could convince them to eat a vegan diet, it might be a smidge easier.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
IamJen is offline  
#7 Old 05-28-2004, 09:23 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Jimdavis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by raylea View Post

Is it normal to question veganism?



Is it okay to have the occasional non-vegan treat if I have a primarily plant-based diet?







Thanks.



Yes. And yes. To both those questions. "Is it okay?" in relation to your diet is a question that no one else can answer for you in regard to ethics... that's up to you. Your doctor might be able to give you advice as to what's most healthy, but in the end, even that's up to you. And it's all okay. It might be unhealthy, it might be fattening, or it might have caused death and suffering to an animal. But those ethics are for you to decide for yourself. You decide what is okay or not in this, and then understand that it is really okay.



Guilt is a dangerous and unnecessary emotion to feel so choked by, in religion and in diet.



Jim
Jimdavis is offline  
#8 Old 05-28-2004, 09:50 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Peter Parker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 581
Quote:
Originally Posted by raylea View Post

Is it normal to question veganism?



So, I've been vegan for a good number of months now (after being ovo-lacto for years), and I really like the fact that no little animal lives have been sacrificed for me to eat. I've been very carelful to make sure that my diet is well balanced and full of wholesome, nutritious foods. But lately I have been feeling so deprived... Some of my favorite dairy-containing delectables have been incredibly appealing. It has taken all I have to restrain myself from eating the fresh pizza my omni family is eating for dinner. So tempting. I am also tired of agonizing over the tiny print on nutrition lables, not being able to go out for a normal meal with friends, and having to go out of the way to find something to eat when travelling.



Thoughts? Suggestions?



Is it okay to have the occasional non-vegan treat if I have a primarily plant-based diet?







Thanks.







we should tie you down and beat you with a wet noodle for considering eating animal.





hahah nah, seriously, this is your diet. this is your life. this is your world. you create it. you have the 'controller' do as you wish.



just dont got ape poop when you do eat animal products and feel bad. Not sure what you call 'normal' but veganism is very normal. ask your body and the shape its in now compared to when crud gathers causing clots from animal fat and so forth.

find a fresh pizza with soy cheese.





what dairy alternative can you not that is similar to 'real' dairy?



everyone gets down at times, how often have you felt this way about your diet or lifestyle?
Peter Parker is offline  
#9 Old 05-28-2004, 11:49 PM
Veggie Regular
 
epski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 12,374
The first few months always seem to be the hardest. We're still so close to our former way of life. After the first year, I've found no desire for anything that comes from an animal. Hang in there! You'll be just fine.
epski is offline  
#10 Old 05-29-2004, 04:44 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Loki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,211
question everything! Question authority, question reality! (I nicked that!)



I think that the whole questioning thing isa good idea, as one does not want to blindly follow something. One must make sure they believe in it.
Loki is offline  
#11 Old 05-29-2004, 06:17 AM
Newbie
 
yumhummus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by raylea View Post

...But lately I have been feeling so deprived... Some of my favorite dairy-containing delectables have been incredibly appealing. It has taken all I have to restrain myself from eating the fresh pizza my omni family is eating for dinner. So tempting. I am also tired of agonizing over the tiny print on nutrition lables, not being able to go out for a normal meal with friends, and having to go out of the way to find something to eat when travelling.



Thoughts? Suggestions?



Is it okay to have the occasional non-vegan treat if I have a primarily plant-based diet?



Hey Raylea, I can relate to what you are going through completely.

After following a strict vegan lifestyle for 2+ years, I went back to an occasional lacto-ovo diet by occasionally eating organic, free-range, rennet & casein free dairy and eggs. Brands like Horizon & Cabot are even available in regular grocery stores, along with Amy's Organic, which makes a rennetless, casein free Pizza. Whole foods makes their own label of rennetless cheeses called 365. Its an adjustment that I can live with, even if its only a temporary thing for me...most of the items that end up in my cart are the usual vegan fare anyway, since they are the things I really prefer to eat. Still it is nice not to feel SO restricted anymore, especially in social situations like family pizza night.

Still, you can stay vegan and enjoy the same foods that omni's do...it just takes a little more preparation. Pizza dough is easy to make with wheat and soy flour...You can find a nice meltable soy or rice cheese without casein, and pile on roasted veggies, garlic and homemade tomato sauce...mmmm!

It also helps to never let yourself get overly hungry so you dont feel "deprived," and make sure to take your B-complex, soy lecithin & L-Carnitine supplements every day.

Stay strong, question everything, and decide for yourself!~

Lisa
yumhummus is offline  
#12 Old 05-29-2004, 01:43 PM
Veggie Regular
 
MollyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,159
(you should get the uncheese cookbook)



Is it really that hard to go out for a "normal" meal? Do you not have, like, Thai food, Chinese food, Italian food in your area? I think it's pretty easy to find restaurants with vegan food in most places, and I'm even allergic to wheat....



I don't think that being vegan requires "agonizing" over the print on nutrition labels. I just look at the label, if it looks vegan, I buy it. It takes two seconds. I don't sit there in the store, wringing my hands and saying, "Oh, where are these mono and diglicerides coming from?" Maybe you're getting too caught up in the details.
MollyGoat is offline  
#13 Old 05-31-2004, 06:49 PM
ae5
Newbie
 
ae5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 43
whether it's okay or not is something only you can answer. if your question is "will you, aeser, consider me vegan if i conciously eat non-vegan things every so often" my answer would be "no", but we are not the vegan police and ultimately you are responsible to yourself (and or your own personal understanding of god should you be so inclined) so if it's okay or not can only be resolved within yourself.
ae5 is offline  
#14 Old 06-01-2004, 05:38 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Jessica's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,467
I agree with Michael, IamJen and most of the others. If eating cheese pizza every few months, or treating yourself to a doughnut (or whatever) once a week, means that you find sticking to a vegan diet the rest of the time a doddle, then I'd say go for it.



I know myself well by now, and I've realised that sometimes I'm too 'all or nothing'. I tried to go vegan, was strict for a few months, then ate some cheese. Instead of saying 'hey, that was nice, but I won't do it again for a while' I just collapsed completely and ended up eating even more dairy than I did prior to the vegan attempt. How stupid is that? Now I'm trying again, but this time I'm not worrying about eating cheese just once a month, or eating a quorn fillet (which has eggs in) once a week. Anything which helps me stay on the straight and narrow 90% of the time has to be a good thing.



And yes, questioning is good. I question everything, which can get tiring, but it's fun and necessary too!



Good luck.
Jessica is offline  
#15 Old 06-01-2004, 01:42 PM
Veggie Regular
 
epski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 12,374
Yeah, I'm learning to lighten up a little on the subject of veganism, too.



Just the other day, when discussing veganism with a curious omni, I even told him that a near-vegan diet still had tremendous benefits.



I do believe that by simply eliminating all meat, dairy, and eggs from our diets will result in a major societal shift. Worrying about it in tiny increments in certain products can definitely be a turn-off for a lot of busy people. I don't mind doing it, but I don't want to turn someone off with an all or nothing attitude. Where it gets sketchy for me is when someone eats honey and calls him- or herself vegan, since that can confuse a lot of people. I don't want to go to a restaurant and find honey in my "vegan" food.
epski is offline  
#16 Old 06-01-2004, 02:05 PM
Veggie Regular
 
giselle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyGoat View Post


I don't think that being vegan requires "agonizing" over the print on nutrition labels. I just look at the label, if it looks vegan,



It's easier to avoid buying foods with labels. I make exceptions for those little stickers on produce, the nutrition facts taped on the front of the bulk bins of nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains, and my two main prepared foods: soy milk and soy yogurt.
giselle is offline  
#17 Old 06-01-2004, 06:09 PM
Veggie Regular
 
MollyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,159
Yeah, I don't buy many foods with "questionable" ingredients anyway.
MollyGoat is offline  
#18 Old 06-01-2004, 07:12 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Thalia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 6,902
Sometimes it helps to indulge in a decadent vegan food like french fries or popcorn with earthbalance. I am not vegan now but have eaten that way off and on and I think sometimes I just needed something a bit more fatty or salty as a treat.
Thalia is offline  
#19 Old 06-01-2004, 07:27 PM
Veggie Regular
 
MollyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,159
Or guacamole...YUM.
MollyGoat is offline  
#20 Old 06-01-2004, 08:02 PM
Beginner
 
Buzzola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 196
Questioning will bring you closer to the truth Personally I think you should hang in there though - keep trying. Maybe don't be so strict, but I think you'll feel great about not giving up once the cravings are gone.



The way I dealt with missing all the dairy was just to

a) buy up as much tofutti as I could

b) cook most of the food I eat



It really saves you the stress of looking through labels because you controll everything you put into it, and it's fun too



And yeah, as everyone said, cutting out anything from your diet is far and away better than cutting out nothing. Whatever you decide is what you should go with.
Buzzola is offline  
#21 Old 06-02-2004, 06:48 AM
Veggie Regular
 
zoebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,451
i've found that telling people to question, consider options and make the best decisions for themselves is always the best way to get them to see your way of thinking (at least consider it). so, like epski, i'm more than happy to talk about the benefits of many kinds of diets, and the dangers of many popular or common dietary practices.



as for eating a bit of cheese or whatever now and again, i see no problem with it. i think it would officially categorize you as "lacto vegetarian" but whatever you want to call yourself is fine with me. i mean, i'm ovo vegetarian, though i only eat eggs maybe every two weeks or three weeks or so. the rest of the time it's a basicly vegan diet for me. looks like i may go back to raw dairy as well (local and raw), but even then, it's not an every day thing--probably eat it with my eggs. so, then i'd be ovo-lacto but basicly eating a vegan diet.



there are many options, and every little bit helps. so, no worries.
zoebird is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off