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Getting upset with Cashier? - Page 6

post #151 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

I would hate it, and I put my cart back.



Yeah, but how much have you spent to get your car repaired because of dents from shopping carts?
post #152 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

yeah, it really shouldn't be up to the government, but the stores.





I wouldn't like it though. How often do you carry about $1 coins? I don't. and I dont want to have to remember one. I guess we could use other coins, or a dollar bill..



Yeah, the dollar coin was just an idea, I'm pretty sure they have the dollar bill ones as well. I live close to a toll road so at work, I see the dollar coins fairly often. If you knew you'd need a coin for the shopping cart, you'd be prepared, it wouldn't be a surprise thing.
post #153 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNK View Post

That's not a legitimate reason?

Not really, no.



Quote:
Originally Posted by froggythefrog View Post

I thought "don't wanna" stopped being legitimate at about 2 years old.

This.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Beancounter View Post

And lifting milk with an outstretched arm isn't difficult.

Once, no. It's not. But I don't lift just one gallon of milk a day. More like 50 to 70... When combined with the 24 packs of soda or water and 50lb bags of dog food or cat litter and gallons of bleach and liters of soda and lots of other heavy items. The fact is that if you're doing it once or twice a day it's not a big deal. When you're doing it hundreds of times a day it become a possibly strained back or pulled shoulder muscle.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

When I go grocery shopping with a basket, I usually just set it up on the counter. I don't unload it. I figure it is easier and faster for both of us, and allows more room for the next customer.

Actually it holds up the line because instead of grabbing the products just off the belt we have to reach at awkward angels to pull stuff out of the basket. And technically the basket would have to be emptied entirely so that we can bag items "properly" and to make sure that we don't drop anything.



I ask people to empty their baskets when they come to my lane. Always. I don't ask rudely either. I stop the belt and say something like "I'm sorry, but would you please empty your basket? Thank you."



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Also, in my experience, people who work in grocery stores typically rotate jobs. They do not stand at the cashier all day long, for eight hours, lifting gallons of milk with an outstretched arm every 3 minutes.

Actually in most large/chain grocery stores cashiers are just that - cashiers. I'm at a register for 8 hours a day. We don't serve any other purposes at the store aside from ringing up customers.



There may be other associates from the store that are called up to help check if the lines are long or what ever but for the most part cashiers are cashiers. In fact that's usually true at smaller grocery stores AFAIK too unless you're shopping late night hours where stores operate with a skeleton crew.
post #154 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beancounter View Post

Yes! The bad attitude of cashiers nowadays is unbelievable. They act like they don't want to be there, and the customer is an adversary. They talk amonst themselves, and do a poor job bagging (which is part of their job description). No matter how nice you are, they are at best "stand-offish"





I don't know where all of you shop, but for the most part the cashiers in stores I go to are very courteous and friendly. MOST. There are a few bad ones out there, and it seems that some of you want to lump all cashiers "nowadays" with the bad few. Uh, there were bad cashiers in days gone by, too.
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post #155 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

I would hate it, and I put my cart back.

People thought it was stupid in the beginning. Now everyone is used to it and doesn't complain anymore. Many people don't use coins but a chip the size of a coin to unlock one of the carts from the chain.
post #156 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

I wouldn't like it though. How often do you carry about $1 coins? I don't. and I dont want to have to remember one. I guess we could use other coins, or a dollar bill..



Here in England we use pound coins, or these little chips you can buy that are the same size and you can keep on your keyring so you always have one.



If you don't have a chip, or a pound coin, the answer is simple. You find someone exiting the shop with their trolley (cart), and give them other coins to the value of a pound and take their trolley, with the pound coin still in it.
post #157 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

I guess what it comes down to is, people are within their rights to not unload the basket if they don't want to - but just like those people who sit and watch while the restaurant server reaches to the farthest end of the table to pick up the hard-to-reach dishes, or drop garbage on the floor at a movie theatre, or leave their shopping carts sitting in the parking lot instead of taking them where they belong, you're going to come across as a lazy, rude ass.



I think the cashier who complains about reaching into a basket sitting right in front of him to take out a few items and swipe them across the scanner comes across as a lazy, rude ass.



Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post

It's not so much the weight more than the angle at which you have to pick up the 8 pounds.



Our ice buckets at work are 7 pounds each when full and people bring 2-3 in at a time... I'm not supposed to lift them because of my back.



True. But I've never seen anyone lift a gallon of milk with an outstretched arm at a grocery store, nor would I know why anyone would need to.



I'm sorry about your back. Cheerleading accident? Ouch! I watched a routine on TV awhile back, and I have to say I definitely have a lot more respect for cheerleaders now!



Quote:
Originally Posted by rissierissie View Post


Once, no. It's not. But I don't lift just one gallon of milk a day. More like 50 to 70... When combined with the 24 packs of soda or water and 50lb bags of dog food or cat litter and gallons of bleach and liters of soda and lots of other heavy items. The fact is that if you're doing it once or twice a day it's not a big deal. When you're doing it hundreds of times a day it become a possibly strained back or pulled shoulder muscle.



I've never put anything like that on the conveyor belt (except for the litter of soda, but if I buy more than one, I only put one bottle on the belt). I always hold them up for the cashier because they don't need to be bagged anyway, and it's much easier on both of us.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

It's faster to scan the items when they're on a conveyor belt than when the cashier has to take them out from the basket first.



Quote:
Actually it holds up the line because instead of grabbing the products just off the belt we have to reach at awkward angels to pull stuff out of the basket. And technically the basket would have to be emptied entirely so that we can bag items "properly" and to make sure that we don't drop anything.



Not if it's only a few items. If the basket is brimming to the top with packets of rice or whatever, sure, it might take a little more time. And in instances like that, I do unload it.



Quote:
I ask people to empty their baskets when they come to my lane. Always. I don't ask rudely either. I stop the belt and say something like "I'm sorry, but would you please empty your basket? Thank you."



And I've had cashiers ask me to leave my items in the basket.





Quote:
Actually in most large/chain grocery stores cashiers are just that - cashiers. I'm at a register for 8 hours a day. We don't serve any other purposes at the store aside from ringing up customers.



There may be other associates from the store that are called up to help check if the lines are long or what ever but for the most part cashiers are cashiers. In fact that's usually true at smaller grocery stores AFAIK too unless you're shopping late night hours where stores operate with a skeleton crew.



Not at the chain stores where I live.
post #158 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorzelGummidge View Post

Here in England we use pound coins, or these little chips you can buy that are the same size and you can keep on your keyring so you always have one.



If you don't have a chip, or a pound coin, the answer is simple. You find someone exiting the shop with their trolley (cart), and give them other coins to the value of a pound and take their trolley, with the pound coin still in it.



It's not that simple if you never carry cash or change.
post #159 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

The "you have to put in one Euro to get your shopping cart and get the Euro back when you return the cart" worked wonder on that problem.



Where I live a substantial portion of the customers wouldn't bother trying to get their dollar back, especially in the dead of winter.
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post #160 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

I think the cashier who complains about reaching into a basket sitting right in front of him to take out a few items and swipe them across the scanner comes across as a lazy, rude ass.



Maybe cashier lanes look different here than where you live. Because here, the basket is not "right in front of them"; the scanner and the keyboard and the debit machine are right in front of them and the conveyor belt is quite a bit to the cashier's right. So to take items from the basket, the cashier has to lean to the right, outstretch their arms to reach into the basket, and lift the items straight up to get them out of the basket, then scan them. If the items weren't in the basket, all the cashier would have to do is reach over with one hand and drag the item across the scanner without lifting them. Lifting item after item straight up out of a basket while leaning over to the right is a strain on the back and shoulders. It is not lazy to not want to strain your back!



Incidentally, the basket does happen to be right in front of the customer. No awkward angles or anything like that. So why not just take the items out?



Also, at grocery stores where I live, the pile of baskets is at the entrance to the cashier's lane. If you leave the items in the basket until the cashier rings your items up, how are you supposed to get the basket back to the pile when there's a lineup of people behind you?
post #161 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie View Post

It's not that simple if you never carry cash or change.



It's still simple. When you go to the supermarket, take some cash or change.
post #162 of 192
Quote:
Incidentally, the basket does happen to be right in front of the customer. No awkward angles or anything like that. So why not just take the items out?



Because sometimes, it's just as easy to leave them in.



Quote:
Also, at grocery stores where I live, the pile of baskets is at the entrance to the cashier's lane. If you leave the items in the basket until the cashier rings your items up, how are you supposed to get the basket back to the pile when there's a lineup of people behind you?



The cashiers here take them and put them on the stack behind their register.
post #163 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post

I'm jealous.



We have dollar coins, we should absolutely have this system. Who the heck would we write to for the system to change? Contact the store, the city, the state?



It's up to the individual stores to institute this. When I lived in NY, a few of the larger chains had the deposit carts and they charged a quarter for them. I thought it was a good system although in really bad weather some people didn't care enough about the $.25 to bring the cart back to the store and left them in the parking lot anyway.
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post #164 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorzelGummidge View Post

It's still simple. When you go to the supermarket, take some cash or change.



It still wouldn't be simple because I'd have to go to an ATM and then go somewhere else to get change.



Anyways.. the baggers at the store I usually go to bring the groceries to the car and take the cart back into the store with them. The other store I go to doesn't seem to have lazy customers because I hardly ever see stray carts in the lot.
post #165 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

Maybe cashier lanes look different here than where you live. Because here, the basket is not "right in front of them"; the scanner and the keyboard and the debit machine are right in front of them and the conveyor belt is quite a bit to the cashier's right. So to take items from the basket, the cashier has to lean to the right, outstretch their arms to reach into the basket, and lift the items straight up to get them out of the basket, then scan them. If the items weren't in the basket, all the cashier would have to do is reach over with one hand and drag the item across the scanner without lifting them. Lifting item after item straight up out of a basket while leaning over to the right is a strain on the back and shoulders. It is not lazy to not want to strain your back!



Incidentally, the basket does happen to be right in front of the customer. No awkward angles or anything like that. So why not just take the items out?



Also, at grocery stores where I live, the pile of baskets is at the entrance to the cashier's lane. If you leave the items in the basket until the cashier rings your items up, how are you supposed to get the basket back to the pile when there's a lineup of people behind you?



That's how the stores around here are set up.
post #166 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchabbey View Post

It's up to the individual stores to institute this. When I lived in NY, a few of the larger chains had the deposit carts and they charged a quarter for them. I thought it was a good system although in really bad weather some people didn't care enough about the $.25 to bring the cart back to the store and left them in the parking lot anyway.



I shop at Aldi's and Save A Lot and they have 25 cent deposit carts there. I think it's a great idea. I also like their system where you bring in your own bags and are responsible for bagging all your own groceries. The cashiers also get to sit down the entire time in a swivel chair right in front of the register which again I think is a cool idea. I've been a cashier and know how much it sucks to stand on your feet for 8 hours a day in the same position.
post #167 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Because sometimes, it's just as easy to leave them in.



Easy for you, difficult and potentially harmful for the cashier (at least with the way cashier lanes are set up where I live)



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

The cashiers here take them and put them on the stack behind their register.



But they don't do that here. So here, you really have to take your items out of the basket so you can stack the basket on the pile before you get to the front of the line.



I suppose that's why there's such a difference of opinion in this thread on the subject: it depends strongly on what the grocery stores are like where we live.
post #168 of 192
Usually when I'm at the store, I load the cart and when I'm done, I scream "HEY I'M READY" and the cashier comes to take the cart and push it to where he/she can scan the items and pack them for me.

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post #169 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

Usually when I'm at the store, I load the cart and when I'm done, I scream "HEY I'M READY" and the cashier comes to take the cart and push it to where he/she can scan the items and pack them for me.



That actually happened to me the other day. It took me a few seconds to realize the customer wanted me to come around and unload his cart for him. After I was done with that he made me pull the cart around and load the bags that he dictated how I was supposed to bag... (ie: NO that goes in a new bag, no no put that in the last bag with the other stuff) back into the cart for him but only AFTER he tested each bag for weight and then had me tie the handles of the bags in knots.



He said I did such a great job that he's going to come my line every time he goes grocery shopping. I wanted to scream.
post #170 of 192
Quote:
Anyways.. the baggers at the store I usually go to bring the groceries to the car and take the cart back into the store with them.



Ah, we don't have anything like this in the UK unless it's a special thing like the Boy Scouts sometimes do it for a week to raise money.



How do you tip the bagger if you don't carry cash?
post #171 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

Easy for you, difficult and potentially harmful for the cashier (at least with the way cashier lanes are set up where I live)



Yes, it must be very different where you live because describing it as difficult and potentially harmful would just be absurd.



Quote:
But they don't do that here. So here, you really have to take your items out of the basket so you can stack the basket on the pile before you get to the front of the line.



I suppose that's why there's such a difference of opinion in this thread on the subject: it depends strongly on what the grocery stores are like where we live.



Yeah, this I can agree with. Different experiences.
post #172 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post


I'm sorry about your back. Cheerleading accident? Ouch! I watched a routine on TV awhile back, and I have to say I definitely have a lot more respect for cheerleaders now!



Cheerleading accident mixed with years of carrying around heavy backpacks. Bad backs run in my family too. I was only in 7th grade when I had my accident, but since I was still growing, I think it did permanent damage. I never went to the doctor after I fell, I just had a sore back for a while. The pain never quite went away and ever since I've had back issues.



I worked my butt off as a cheerleader, even though I never got to participate in any competitions. It really is a lot of work and dangerous. I wish I had been a cheerleader in high school.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchabbey View Post

It's up to the individual stores to institute this. When I lived in NY, a few of the larger chains had the deposit carts and they charged a quarter for them. I thought it was a good system although in really bad weather some people didn't care enough about the $.25 to bring the cart back to the store and left them in the parking lot anyway.



Hey, but even if people return them most of the time, I'm happy. No matter what the weather is or who I have with me, I always return the cart. 25 cents isn't enough, they should bump it up to $1.
post #173 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Yes, it must be very different where you live because describing it as difficult and potentially harmful would just be absurd.



Yes, it's so absurd of me to suggest that risking back strain is potentially harmful.



But it's a moot point, since at every grocery store in Canada that I've been to, the basket pile is at the entrance to the cashier lane, so you have to put your basket there before you get to the front of the line, which means you have to unload it yourself, every time. The horror!
post #174 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hekaterine View Post

Ah, we don't have anything like this in the UK unless it's a special thing like the Boy Scouts sometimes do it for a week to raise money.



How do you tip the bagger if you don't carry cash?



They can't accept tips.



This store does it because the parking lot is pretty small and they don't have the space for cart corrals.
post #175 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by rissierissie View Post

That actually happened to me the other day. It took me a few seconds to realize the customer wanted me to come around and unload his cart for him. After I was done with that he made me pull the cart around and load the bags that he dictated how I was supposed to bag... (ie: NO that goes in a new bag, no no put that in the last bag with the other stuff) back into the cart for him but only AFTER he tested each bag for weight and then had me tie the handles of the bags in knots.



He said I did such a great job that he's going to come my line every time he goes grocery shopping. I wanted to scream.



You shouldn't cater to Sevenseas like that.
post #176 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by froggythefrog View Post

You shouldn't cater to Sevenseas like that.



Yeah, seriously.





post #177 of 192
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

What does a delivery business have to do with being a cashier? They're different jobs with different requirements. And when you worked out, if you were lifting the equivalent of a gallon of milk while having your arms stretched out, your feet side-by-side, and leaning forward, that puts strain on your back. Not just weak backs, all backs. And I bet you never worked out like that for 8 hours straight.

Considering my own experience in other places and the experiences of people in this thread it appears to be a physical job. Better get in shape.



How much do you want to bet I've never worked an 8-hour shift that involved a lot of lifting heavy things? How much do you want to bet that you've never done half the stuff I've had to at jobs? I'll make that bet simply because if you had you would not be trying to defend cashiering as tough or that these sorts of jobs shouldn't require some physical fitness. Food service, grocery stores, etc, these jobs aren't desk jobs - you need some actual strength and stamina. That's the nature of the industry.



Go work in a kitchen, food line, farm, or similar "dirty job", or even as a shelver, stockperson, whatever, and tell me with a straight face that grocery store cashier is a demanding job, physically or otherwise. At most it's emotionally draining from having to put on appearances all day. That and the boredom are about the only two hard parts of the job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post

I hate to say this because it's harsh... but I agree. It's annoying to hear people complaining about others "not doing their jobs" yet what about the job of the customers? They're customers, not royalty. At my job, people are LAZY. They leave their trash all over the place when we have 6 trash cans on our TINY lot, at all ends, you're never far from one. These people have the mentality that it's our jobs to clean up after them.

Are you getting paid to clean up after them?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post

I wish we had that here! Seriously, we need it, it's an out of control problem.

Seriously, then they could fire a couple people and/or cut back hours.
post #178 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

Yes, it's so absurd of me to suggest that risking back strain is potentially harmful.



I'll warn my cashier next time he handles my lettuce leaves.



Like I said, I don't put heavy items on the conveyor belt. Never have. Most people have the decency not to. But if you can't handle a gallon of milk, then perhaps for your own safety you should seek employment elsewhere.
post #179 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post


Like I said, I don't put heavy items on the conveyor belt.

So how does the cashier register them?

"and I stand

upon a mountain

made of weak and useless men"

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post #180 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Most people have the decency not to.



Just for you today I kept a list of heavy things that people placed on my belt, that I had to subsequently lift and place elsewhere. Please note this is in addition to all the other stuff I put into bags today.



39 gallons of milk

72 2 liter bottles of soda

37 24 pack cases of water

17 24 packs cases of soda cans

21 12 pack cases of soda cans

5 25lb bags of dog food

2 25lb bags of cat liter

4 10lb bags of charcoal

2 microwaves

1 small air conditioner



So after doing some Googling here are the weights:

1 gallon of milk 8 pounds

2 liter bottles of soda 4 pounds

case of water 26 pounds

24 can case of soda 20 pounds

12 can case 10 pounds



That means today, without counting the microwaves or the air conditioner because I have no idea what they weigh I lifted almost 2,300 pounds today over a 5 and 1/2 hour shift with a single 15 minute break. That's over one ton. It isn't a question of not being able to handle a gallon of milk, it's a question of being able to through out the course of a day lift over one ton of weight and move it from one place to another without hurting your back.
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