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The recipe calls for an egg

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
When you are faced with a recipe that requires an egg (eg: cake) what do you replace it with?



I am considering a vegan lifestyle. I feel I sit somewhere between at the moment.



I cook a lot of cakes and desserts and such. With butter and milk there are substitutes.... but none for the humble egg (that I know of). How do I get around this?







Sorry about another egg question!
post #2 of 14
It depends on what you're trying to make - there are lots of substitutes



This page is very useful for info about replacing eggs in baking: http://www.theppk.com/veganbaking.html



Quote:

Replacing eggs is the most challenging aspects of vegan baking. Those suckers bind, they leaven and they give structure to our baked goods. However, like a bad boyfriend, they can be replaced, and with pleasing results. Here some info on replacements I have tried.



Flax Seeds

How to use it:

1 Tablespoon flax seeds plus 3 Tablespoons water replaces one egg. Finely grind 1 tablespoon whole flaxseeds in a blender or coffee grinder, or use 2 1/2 tablespoons pre-ground flaxseeds. Transfer to a bowl and beat in 3 tablespoons of water using a whisk or fork. It will become very gooey and gelatinous, much like an egg white. In some recipes, you can leave the ground flax in the blender and add the other wet ingredients to it, thus saving you the extra step of the bowl.



When it works best:

Flax seeds have a distinct earthy granola taste. It tastes best and works very well in things like pancakes, and whole grain items, such as bran muffins and corn muffins. It is perfect for oatmeal cookies, and the texture works for cookies in general, although the taste may be too pronounced for some. Chocolate cake-y recipes have mixed results, I would recommend only using one portion flax-egg in those, because the taste can be overpowering.



Tips:

Always store ground flaxseeds in the freezer because they are highly perishable. This mixture is not only an excellent replacement for eggs, it also contributes vital omega-3 fatty acids.



Where to get it:

Health food stores



Silken Tofu

How to use it:

1/4 cup blended silken tofu = 1 egg. Whiz in a blender until completely smooth and creamy, leaving no graininess or chunks. You will want to add other wet ingredients to this mixture to get it to blend properly. I recommend vacuum packed extra firm silken tofu, such as Mori-Nu.



When it works best:

Dense cakes and brownies, and in smaller quantites for lighter cakes and fluffy things (if the recipe calls for 3 eggs only use 2 "tofu" eggs"). Whizzed tofu leaves virtually no taste, so it is an excellent replacer in cake recipes. In cookie recipes, it may make the cookie more cake-y and fluffy than anticipated, add 1 teaspoon of starch to the recipe (such as arrowroot or corn starch) to combat that. It may make pancakes a little heavy, so it is not recommended as a quick replacement for eggs in pancakes, although it could work well with a little experimentation.



Where to get it:

Health food store shelves, and in some supermarkets.



Ener-G Egg Replacer

How to use it:

1 1/2 tablespoons + 2 tablespoons water mixed well = 1 egg

Many people swear by this egg replacer. I think it is good to use in a pinch, in all baking that requires a few eggs. However, I can definitely taste it in cakes and cookies (tastes chalk-y), and I'm not crazy about the dense texture it turns out.



When it works best:

It seems to work best in cookies, or things that are supposed to be a little crispy.



Where to get it:

Health food stores, some supermarkets in the baking or ethnic food section



Bananas

How to use it:

1/2 banana blended until smooth or mashed well= 1 egg.

Bananas work wonders as an egg replacer in baking, which is the reason many banana bread recipes don't require eggs. They hold the air bubbles well, make things nice and moist, and impart a nice flavor. However, you don't want everything tasting like banana, so use in things where the taste won't be intrusive. I've also noticed that baked goods using banana brown very nicely.



When it works best:

Quick breads, muffins, cakes, pancakes



Tip: Make sure bananas are nice and ripe and have started to brown.



Where to get it:

Just kidding, I think you can figure this one out.



Soy yogurt

How to use it:

1/4 cup soy yogurt = 1 egg.

Soy yogurt works a lot like whizzed tofu as an egg replacer. It makes things moist and yummy.



When it works best:

Quick breads, muffins, cakes



Where to get it:

Health food stores, yuppyish supermarkets
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
yeah my bad i found this thread after i posted... but thank u for re-posting!!!
post #4 of 14
At my supermarket I bought a product called Egg Replacer by Paneriso Foods. About $5 for the equivelant of 100 eggs. It is a mixture of potato starch, guar gum, sodium bicarbonate and baking powder. Works good for cupcakes, muffins, etc. You would find it in the health food section of the store.
post #5 of 14
I've also read that applesauce works.

Never tried it, though. I don't cook. :3

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post #6 of 14
In some cases (though I'm not sure exactly which) egg can be replaced with 1 tsp of corn starch mixed with 2 tablespoons of water. It works in cookies at least
post #7 of 14
With baking I find it easier to use recipes which are vegan to begin with, rather than adapting existing non-vegan recipes, although adapting can be done with a bit of experimenting. The book Vegan with a Vengeance has some good cake recipes and I bet there's quite a few in the recipes section on here.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puppet Master View Post

I've also read that applesauce works.

Never tried it, though. I don't cook. :3



It works. Better for cakes bread and cookies,tho...
post #9 of 14
1/4 cup apple sauce for one egg
post #10 of 14
For cakes, I generally go with a vegan cake recipe. There are tons out there, and the egg replacing decision has been made for you! For cookies, I go with either 1/4 cup pureed silken tofu or 1/4 cup soy yogurt per egg. In muffins I generally use 1/4 cup mashed banana or 1/4 cup applesauce per egg. The only thing I really haven't worked out is how to replace whipped egg whites (like meringues).
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post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

The only thing I really haven't worked out is how to replace whipped egg whites (like meringues).



that's ok - meringues are too hard for me LOL
post #12 of 14
I use Orgran No-Egg egg replacer in pancakes and other baked goods and it works really well. In cakes and cupcakes, I also add a sachet of baking powder and a good tablespoon of apple cider vinegar. And soya milk. I adjust the flavour to the cakes I want to make, like vanilla or chocolate or mocha.
post #13 of 14
Ask your Grandmother or great grandmother about cooking cakes without eggs. In the 1940s, during WWII eggs were rationed and therefore rarely used in baking. Homemakers devised how to make cakes without eggs. Here is a typical recipe.



Crazy Cake/Wacky Cake



Mix in baking pan, do not grease

3 cups flour

1 tsp soda

1/2 tsp salt

6 Tablespoons Coca

2 Cups Sugar

Sift several times, then add

2 Tablespoons Vinegar

12 Tablespoons or 1/2 cup Wesson oil

2 Cups Cold Water

1 tsp. Vanilla

1/2 Cup Nuts if you like



Bake 30 minutes or until done at 350- degrees.





I know we like to think all of this eggless stuff is new and unique to vegans but in reality these recipes have been around for decades. Yes, the egg subsitutes are handy but in many cases simply not necessary.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFalafel View Post

Ask your Grandmother or great grandmother about cooking cakes without eggs. In the 1940s, during WWII eggs were rationed and therefore rarely used in baking. Homemakers devised how to make cakes without eggs. Here is a typical recipe.



Crazy Cake/Wacky Cake



Mix in baking pan, do not grease

3 cups flour

1 tsp soda

1/2 tsp salt

6 Tablespoons Coca

2 Cups Sugar

Sift several times, then add

2 Tablespoons Vinegar

12 Tablespoons or 1/2 cup Wesson oil

2 Cups Cold Water

1 tsp. Vanilla

1/2 Cup Nuts if you like



Bake 30 minutes or until done at 350- degrees.





I know we like to think all of this eggless stuff is new and unique to vegans but in reality these recipes have been around for decades. Yes, the egg subsitutes are handy but in many cases simply not necessary.



Thanx for this...sounds yummy and am sooo gonna try this
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