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Shopping at Walmart as a vegan - ingredients...

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
I'm going to the U.S.A. soon and won't have much choice but to shop at Walmart. But, as U.S. Americans probably know, food in the U.S.A. doesn't generally even say it's vegetarian, let alone vegan, even when it is.



So how do I make sure the ingredients I read aren't from an animal source? Is there a big list of ingredients that come from animals somewhere on the net? Can mono- and di-glycerides come from an animal?



Also is there any way to tell when "Natural Flavorings" are animal-based?
post #2 of 38
Check this thread:



http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...ad.php?t=71315
post #3 of 38
Shopping only at a Wal-Mart isn't so bad, I do it all the time.



Bread is most likely going to be a problem; I have never found a vegan loaf there. You may have more luck with tortillas, but you will probably only find them around the bakery/deli section (look for a brand called Joseph's), and watch out for L-cysteine.



Other than that though, eating vegan at Wal-Mart is fairly easy. Beans (they even have vegetarian baked beans), rice (several of the pre-packaged rices are vegan, usually under a brand called Near East), grains, fruits, veggies, soy milk, tofu, energy bars like Luna and Odwalla, etc. If you want cereal, all of Kashi's organic line is vegan (and one of their frozen dinners is too). Wal-Mart also carries vegan condiments like Annie's teriyaki sauce that are actually marked vegetarian and other foods like hummus. For the rest, though, you will just have to read the ingredients.



Keep the foods simple, and you shouldn't have a problem. This website is helpful to me: http://www.happycow.net/health-animal-ingredients.html
post #4 of 38
For natural flavorings, you will just have to call the company, unfortunately. Read more about them here.
post #5 of 38
Getting food at walmart should be pretty easy. For frozen "convenience foods", they carry Boca and Amy's Kitchen products (the ones that are vegan are labeled). They also carry veggie dogs, veggie sausages and veggie lunchmeat, most of which should be vegan. I've never seen non-dairy cheeses at Walmart (I've seen soy cheese, but it wasn't vegan). BTW, they keep the non-frozen veggie "meats" in the produce section. For other foods, stick to basics. Stick with stuff where all of the ingredients sound like food. Canned beans are cheap and plentiful. Dried pasta tends to be vegan unless it's labeled "Egg Noodles". You should also be able to find vegan tomato sauces, or you can just make it from canned tomatoes, garlic, onions and spices. The walmart brand soy milk is good (and cheap). They also carry Silk. I've found that the produce at walmart is decent.
post #6 of 38
Thread Starter 
What the frig? Soya (soy) products were invented to help people who are vegan or have an allergy to milk... yet I've just found some "soy" yoghurts on Walmart's website that contain milk-based cultures! And yet it states 'Good Source of Calcium and Protein That's Lactose-Free!' - does that mean U.S. labelling laws are even more lax than the U.K.'s extremely lax labelling laws? (The only reason allergens are listed on U.K. products is because of European Directives)
post #7 of 38
I shop at Wal-mart often as well. But I also hit up Target for cleaning products and hygenic products. Also, depending on where you will be located, there are Sprouts markets, Wholefood markets, and Central Markets. Being on a tight budget, I definitely don't go willie-nillie; but I do go and get sale items often, like this week shelled wal-nuts were 2.89 per pound, which are regularly like $8-10 per pound.
post #8 of 38
Yup, lactose-free doesn't necessarily mean dairy-free (unfortunately). Tofutti cheese is dairy-free but the walmart near me doesn't have it. They do have non-dairy sour cream and cream cheese though.



I just discovered that Nature Valley Roasted Almond granola bars are vegan (a lot of granola bars contain honey) so there's some easy snacking goodness for you.
post #9 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LionSpirit View Post

What the frig? Soya (soy) products were invented to help people who are vegan or have an allergy to milk... yet I've just found some "soy" yoghurts on Walmart's website that contain milk-based cultures! And yet it states 'Good Source of Calcium and Protein That's Lactose-Free!' - does that mean U.S. labelling laws are even more lax than the U.K.'s extremely lax labelling laws? (The only reason allergens are listed on U.K. products is because of European Directives)



erm, no. they were mainly put in place for the lactose intollerant market, which is much much bigger than the vegan and allergic markets combined (a huge percentage of asians and africans are lactose intollerant, and a decent amount of people with european ancestry are too).



lactose free doesn't mean casein-free or culture-free, it just means it hasn't got milk-sugar in it, won't give someone who is lactose intollerant the galloping trots.
post #10 of 38
I'll keep this short and apologize for thread crapping, but please don't shop at wal-mart if you can avoid it. They are cheap and everywhere and oh so convenient, but so is meat. We all live without meat and can sure as hell get by without supporting wal-mart
post #11 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Shopping only at a Wal-Mart isn't so bad, I do it all the time.



Bread is most likely going to be a problem; I have never found a vegan loaf there. You may have more luck with tortillas, but you will probably only find them around the bakery/deli section (look for a brand called Joseph's), and watch out for L-cysteine.



Other than that though, eating vegan at Wal-Mart is fairly easy. Beans (they even have vegetarian baked beans), rice (several of the pre-packaged rices are vegan, usually under a brand called Near East), grains, fruits, veggies, soy milk, tofu, energy bars like Luna and Odwalla, etc. If you want cereal, all of Kashi's organic line is vegan (and one of their frozen dinners is too). Wal-Mart also carries vegan condiments like Annie's teriyaki sauce that are actually marked vegetarian and other foods like hummus. For the rest, though, you will just have to read the ingredients.



Keep the foods simple, and you shouldn't have a problem. This website is helpful to me: http://www.happycow.net/health-animal-ingredients.html





Hmm... in the U.K. all, or vitually all, tins of baked beans are vegetarian and say so on the label
post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AwardTour View Post

I'll keep this short and apologize for thread crapping, but please don't shop at wal-mart if you can avoid it. They are cheap and everywhere and oh so convenient, but so is meat. We all live without meat and can sure as hell get by without supporting wal-mart



The OP is going to be on vacation and it sounds like walmart is going to be the only grocery store he'll be able to go to without going WAY out of the way.



Quote:

Hmm... in the U.K. all, or vitually all, tins of baked beans are vegetarian and say so on the label



In the US, baked beans are typically not vegetarian (they usually have something horrible like pork in them.) It's pretty easy to find vegetarian baked beans though. They're usually labeled vegetarian. Also most beans that are labeled "fat-free" are vegan. Just check the ingredients. Plain (non-baked, non-seasoned) canned beans are almost always vegan.
post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by codemonkey View Post

The OP is going to be on vacation and it sounds like walmart is going to be the only grocery store he'll be able to go to without going WAY out of the way.







In the US, baked beans are typically not vegetarian (they usually have something horrible like pork in them.) It's pretty easy to find vegetarian baked beans though. They're usually labeled vegetarian. Also most beans that are labeled "fat-free" are vegan. Just check the ingredients. Plain (non-baked, non-seasoned) canned beans are almost always vegan.



Really? I could never find vegan baked beans until about a few months ago. Not that I eat them very often, or at all, actually, but sometimes my mother likes them for certain holidays. Maybe it's a regional thing.
post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AwardTour View Post

I'll keep this short and apologize for thread crapping, but please don't shop at wal-mart if you can avoid it. They are cheap and everywhere and oh so convenient, but so is meat. We all live without meat and can sure as hell get by without supporting wal-mart



Not for everyone. If I didn't shop at walmart supercenter, I would strave.
post #15 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by codemonkey View Post

Yup, lactose-free doesn't necessarily mean dairy-free (unfortunately). Tofutti cheese is dairy-free but the walmart near me doesn't have it. They do have non-dairy sour cream and cream cheese though.



I just discovered that Nature Valley Roasted Almond granola bars are vegan (a lot of granola bars contain honey) so there's some easy snacking goodness for you.



Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

erm, no. they were mainly put in place for the lactose intollerant market, which is much much bigger than the vegan and allergic markets combined (a huge percentage of asians and africans are lactose intollerant, and a decent amount of people with european ancestry are too).



lactose free doesn't mean casein-free or culture-free, it just means it hasn't got milk-sugar in it, won't give someone who is lactose intollerant the galloping trots.



But if something is made with milk, it has lactose in it! It is possible to remove most of it, but a tiny percentage would still remain



Quote:
Originally Posted by AwardTour View Post

I'll keep this short and apologize for thread crapping, but please don't shop at wal-mart if you can avoid it. They are cheap and everywhere and oh so convenient, but so is meat. We all live without meat and can sure as hell get by without supporting wal-mart



In the town that I'm going to, I don't have much choice. There's a Piggly Wiggly's
post #16 of 38
Quote:
For frozen "convenience foods", they carry Boca and Amy's Kitchen products (the ones that are vegan are labeled)



Lucky you! The walmart, by me has 2 itty-bitty shelves in the freezer section w/morning star and bocca products, but no Amy's! I'm so jealous!
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LionSpirit View Post

I'm going to the U.S.A. soon and won't have much choice but to shop at Walmart. But, as U.S. Americans probably know, food in the U.S.A. doesn't generally even say it's vegetarian, let alone vegan, even when it is.



So how do I make sure the ingredients I read aren't from an animal source? Is there a big list of ingredients that come from animals somewhere on the net? Can mono- and di-glycerides come from an animal?



Also is there any way to tell when "Natural Flavorings" are animal-based?



Is there some rule that says that you have to shop at Walmart because you are in the US?



I've never shopped there in my entire life.
post #18 of 38
Quote:
In the town that I'm going to, I don't have much choice. There's a Piggly Wiggly's



What part of the South will you be visiting? I live in Louisiana.
post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LionSpirit View Post

But if something is made with milk, it has lactose in it! It is possible to remove most of it, but a tiny percentage would still remain.



if something is made with casein, (which is usually the 'dairy' component in those veggie cheeses) all thats used is the casein protein part of the milk, which is extracted in a curds and whey type dealeo. http://www.wisegeek.com/how-is-casei...-from-milk.htm



while casein is still a dairy product, its not 'dairy' in that its 'milk'- its 'fat'. one single particle per bajillion of lactose that might have snuck into the very small amount of casein in an individual cheese slice is very very very unlikely to trigger any kind of gastro-intestinal response in someone who has a lactose intollerance.



also, if something in america is voluntarily labelled as lactose free, it "must not contain lactose as an ingredient or as a component of an ingredient and should adhere to the provisions of 21 CFR 105.62 on hypoallergenic foods."
post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by codemonkey View Post

Yup, lactose-free doesn't necessarily mean dairy-free (unfortunately). Tofutti cheese is dairy-free but the walmart near me doesn't have it. They do have non-dairy sour cream and cream cheese though.

I just discovered that Nature Valley Roasted Almond granola bars are vegan (a lot of granola bars contain honey) so there's some easy snacking goodness for you.



Do you remember the brand? I use to avoid Walmart, but I am temporarly living in a small town, that is dependent on that store. It's over an hour drive for me to make it to Vegas where everything I could need that's vegan is minutes away. I've been making my own mayo for the time being, but sour cream and cream cheese are non existant here.
post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bells View Post

Really? I could never find vegan baked beans until about a few months ago. Not that I eat them very often, or at all, actually, but sometimes my mother likes them for certain holidays. Maybe it's a regional thing.



I'm confident Bush's brand Vegetarian baked beans are vegan, if not, ouch...i've eaten those over the past year.
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamandura View Post

Do you remember the brand? I use to avoid Walmart, but I am temporarly living in a small town, that is dependent on that store. It's over an hour drive for me to make it to Vegas where everything I could need that's vegan is minutes away. I've been making my own mayo for the time being, but sour cream and cream cheese are non existant here.



The Walmart in my neighborhood carries Tofutti Better than Sour Cream and Tofutti Cream Cheese.
post #23 of 38
Thread Starter 
If most stuff aint labelled as vegan in the U.S.A., how do you know whether sugar in a product has been refined with bone char? Or do you simply not know without contacting every single manufacturer?
post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LionSpirit View Post

If most stuff aint labelled as vegan in the U.S.A., how do you know whether sugar in a product has been refined with bone char? Or do you simply not know without contacting every single manufacturer?



if it specifically says "beet sugar" you're safe. if not, then yeah.



http://www.vegsource.com/jo/qa/qasugar.htm
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LionSpirit View Post

If most stuff aint labelled as vegan in the U.S.A., how do you know whether sugar in a product has been refined with bone char? Or do you simply not know without contacting every single manufacturer?



You pretty much don't know, same with natural flavoring, which can mean anything.
post #26 of 38
Most granulated sugar in the US is beet sugar. If the label says "Cane Sugar" or "Pure Cane Sugar" it's probably refined with bone char. If it just says sugar, it's probably beet sugar but there's no way to know for sure unless you call the company.
post #27 of 38
Don't forget the restaurant/health food store finder at www.happycow.com! Just type in the zip code of your destination for listings and reviews of all the nearest food options.
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AwardTour View Post

I'll keep this short and apologize for thread crapping, but please don't shop at wal-mart if you can avoid it. They are cheap and everywhere and oh so convenient, but so is meat. We all live without meat and can sure as hell get by without supporting wal-mart

http://wakeupwalmart.com





Quote:
Originally Posted by broccolichick View Post

Is there some rule that says that you have to shop at Walmart because you are in the US?



I've never shopped there in my entire life.

This is awesome.

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post #29 of 38
it really depends on where you're going to be... walmart has some vegan things; i live in georgia now and publix has a lot of good choices; if you can find a wholefoods or a trader joe's then you'll be set. most semi-not-too-small towns should have a health food store within driving distance. good luck!
post #30 of 38
I haven't been in a Wal-Mart in years. I'm often at Target, because it's (almost) right next door. I know Target has veg*n brands (most frozen food, but there are shelved items, too).

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Your KORRA mom KORRA said KORRA I KORRA could KORRA take KORRA you KORRA to KORRA the KORRA dance KORRA tonight.

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