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Cat's Protection League is dropping the ball - now what?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
My old cat is lonely and pining. She is not happy since her favourite person passed away. Sadly my lifestyle isn't much to her liking. She wants someone home several hours a night preferably sitting still so she can sit on their lap.



I've had some recent unfortunate events that have led to major changes in my life. One of these changes will mean more travel for work, which means me being even less of a companion to the cat.



It's clear to me the cat would be happier at a new home with a more dedicated human looking after her. So I emailed the local CPL. Didn't get an answer. I then called the local number on their website and left a message. No response. So I then travel over to the local CPL charity shop and have a chat their. They gave me a different number to call. I call that number and leave a message. Someone then calls me to say they are not the person to call and for me call a different number. I call that number and leave a message. finally someone calls me up and starts telling me about the large number of pregnant cats and kittens they are now dealing with. I sympathise and re-iterate my cats situation and ask for advice on what to do. The person I'm talking to says she'll talk to others and then get back to me. Its' been two weeks and no one has contacted me.



Now what? I respect the CPL as thats where my cat was originally adopted from. They do a good job screening applicants and matching cats with humans. But it appears they are inundated now. I don;t want to just give the cat to someone from a newspaper ad (if anyone even wants to adopt a 13 year old cat).



So now what do I do? Just pay for pet sitters to come over and feed the cat while I'm off for days at a time? Give the cat to the RSPCA where she will no doubt be 'dispatched' within a week? Or? And before you jump all over me, I did not want to adopt the cat for just the reasons above but my wife insisted. Now what?
post #2 of 24
I don't know where you're based at the mo Mr F, but is there an alternate CPL that may be able to help? I got both of mine from Croydon CPL but I think there are several branches in London.

http://www.catchat.org/adoption may be of some help.
post #3 of 24
Have you thought of contacting either your local sheltered housing or community luch club or even your local vets to see if any older people are looking for a companion animal. Even a local health visitor might know of someone.
post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
Holy cow, thanks for the great link but the CPL in the neighbouring county hasn't even bothered to return my email or voicemail!



I've put word out to everyone and nobody is interested. I won't do it myself but its becoming clear to me why people abandon their pets. These so-called charities may be good at generating revenue and working charity shops but when it comes to dealing with cats are just not up to the task. I'm shocked that I really have no other choice but to take my cat down to the RSPCA.
post #5 of 24
The rescue you adopted your cat from, namely cats protection, should REALLY offer you advice or take your cat back. Them not even returning your calls is bang out of order IMO. Did you sign a rehomeing contract when you adopted her? There is often a clause to state that in the event of you no longer being able to keep her, then the cat must be returned to CPL. I would have a check back and have a look because rehomeing the cat yourself could well leave you open to legal action if a contract of this type has been signed.



Quote:
I've put word out to everyone and nobody is interested. I won't do it myself but its becoming clear to me why people abandon their pets. These so-called charities may be good at generating revenue and working charity shops but when it comes to dealing with cats are just not up to the task.



It will never be clear to me why people abandon their animals, it is a cruel and sellfish deed. Animal rescues should not have to take responsability for other peoples failings but they do and for that we should be grateful. The CPL are not perfect but they have helped a hell of alot of cats, including your own initially, so should be cut a little slack. The rescue crisis in this country is immense as a result of irresponsable owners and breeders, these are the people not up to the task not those who pick up the pieces.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterpixie View Post

The rescue you adopted your cat from, namely cats protection, should REALLY offer you advice or take your cat back. Them not even returning your calls is bang out of order IMO. Did you sign a rehomeing contract when you adopted her? There is often a clause to state that in the event of you no longer being able to keep her, then the cat must be returned to CPL. I would have a check back and have a look because rehomeing the cat yourself could well leave you open to legal action if a contract of this type has been signed.







It will never be clear to me why people abandon their animals, it is a cruel and sellfish deed. Animal rescues should not have to take responsability for other peoples failings but they do and for that we should be grateful. The CPL are not perfect but they have helped a hell of alot of cats, including your own initially, so should be cut a little slack. The rescue crisis in this country is immense as a result of irresponsable owners and breeders, these are the people not up to the task not those who pick up the pieces.



What I take issue with is the CPL gets tax-exempt status for their charity shops, accept donations and other income on the basis that they are actually protecting and rehoming cats. If they are not actually doing this then shouldn't they be guilty of fraud?



Or are we supposed to be happy that a only a few cats have 'slipped through the net' and fork out more donations for an organisation that is dropping the ball?
post #7 of 24
Quote:
What I take issue with is the CPL gets tax-exempt status for their charity shops, accept donations and other income on the basis that they are actually protecting and rehoming cats. If they are not actually doing this then shouldn't they be guilty of fraud?



They are not guilty of fraud. They rehomed and reunited 55,500 cats last year, no easy task. Add to that the money they pour into education, neutering programs and feral relocations. But hey if you want to report them for fraud then i'm sure the charitys comission would be happy to hear your case - then they would laugh at you.



Quote:
Or are we supposed to be happy that a only a few cats have 'slipped through the net' and fork out more donations for an organisation that is dropping the ball?



They cannot help every cat in the country nor should they have to. Do you know how much it costs to take in, care for and rehome one cat? A hell of alot. To be honest I don't think you are in a position to critisize since you are failing in your reponsabilitys and adding to the problem by sending you cat back. I understand your bitter about not recieving help from the CPL and I have already stated that I think that is wrong but who's fault is it that you can no longer look after your cat? The CPL's? Your's?
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterpixie View Post

They are not guilty of fraud. They rehomed and reunited 55,500 cats last year, no easy task. Add to that the money they pour into education, neutering programs and feral relocations. But hey if you want to report them for fraud then i'm sure the charitys comission would be happy to hear your case - then they would laugh at you.







They cannot help every cat in the country nor should they have to. Do you know how much it costs to take in, care for and rehome one cat? A hell of alot. To be honest I don't think you are in a position to critisize since you are failing in your reponsabilitys and adding to the problem by sending you cat back. I understand your bitter about not recieving help from the CPL and I have already stated that I think that is wrong but who's fault is it that you can no longer look after your cat? The CPL's? Your's?



Read my first post again, please.



If the CPL pick and choose which cats they rehome then maybe they should be upfront about that? They make a big fuss about how they never destroy unwanted cats but the reality is they don't do the destroying, they just 'drop the ball' and let the RSPCA destroy them for them. At least the RSPCA is truthful in their dealings with the public.
post #9 of 24
Wow. So suddenly you find having a pet an inconvenience to your lifestyle so you want to just dump it off at the local shelter and then get miffed when they won't return your phone calls with in 35 seconds of you having rang?



When I lived in Sydney I did a lot of work for the Australian branch of the CPA and you have absolutely and utterly no idea of the sheer number of abandoned cats in this world. There is just no what the CPA or any shelter can take care of them all. You know what? If it wasn't for irresponsible owners who see cats as object that they can dump on the nearest shelter the moment they get bored we'd only have half the problem we have.



Yeah well, you're bored with your cat and can't be bothered looking after her any more. Well, get off your fat arse and rehome her yourself rather than passing the buck and relying on someone to do it for you.



You're the one that "dropped the ball" here, not an overworked shelter that is struggling to cope with numbers of genuinely homeless cats. These shelters are for the truly needy animals, not a convenience for someone who suddenly decided their animal no longer goes with their decor.
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post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFalafel View Post

finally someone calls me up and starts telling me about the large number of pregnant cats and kittens they are now dealing with.





In one ear and out the other, eh?
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post #11 of 24
Quote:
If the CPL pick and choose which cats they rehome then maybe they should be upfront about that? They make a big fuss about how they never destroy unwanted cats but the reality is they don't do the destroying, they just 'drop the ball' and let the RSPCA destroy them for them. At least the RSPCA is truthful in their dealings with the public.



I will repeat - The CPL directly helped 55,500 cats last year and indirectly helped thousands more. You have no room to critize as you have officially helped -1 cats.



The cats protection have a difficult choice to make, they can take in hard to rehome cats over easier cats and help less over all or they can weight their waiting list in favour of cats that will be in and out in a few weeks and help thousands more. Many of the big shelters do this and it is a system open to question but it is not fraud, they are honest about it if asked. It is not their fault that people do not understand the lifelong implecations of breeding and ownership.



YOU don't seem to understand that an animal should be for life, you have decided to fail your cat because she no longer suits your lifestyle. You ranting about how the CPL has 'dropped the ball' could discourage people from giving and rehomeing from them which is wrong since it is YOU who has failed your cat.
post #12 of 24
WOW....



I would reccomend prehaps, hiring a pet-sitter? Someone who does a little more than just drop off food, someone who will cuddle/love on/care for the cat when you can not.

The cat is your responsability. Not that of a charity, a shelter or anyone else. You made the choice to take in a living being who is entirely dependant on you. It isn't like a car, or a peice of furniture. You can not just get rid of it when it no longer suits your needs.

How about, if you are intent on rehoming, placing a newspaper ad, or some such thing, and TALK to the person. Visit their home, have them come and meet the cat first, if you find someone willing to adopt.

Do not just dump him or her out on the shelter because you no longer find her life to be convenient. You knowingly made lifestyle changes, and that is NOT your cats fault.

I see at the shelter I volunteer at tons of older cats, some who have lived for 10 or more years in a nice home with caretakers. The animals, it is obvious when they are crying in their cages desperate for attention, or left in a box outside the door at night with their fancy collars and healthy appearance, that these cats, for whatever reason, stopped being a convenience to their owners, and the people they have been dedicated companions for years on end for, simply did not care enough. So they lay in a tiny cage all day, unable to compete with the kittens (who are far too abundant as well) and just sort of...close in on themselves, stop eating, stop moving, washing themselves. The shelter I volunteer at doesnt even euth unless it is health or temperment reasons....



Please, I know you are trying harder than many, but with a living breathing creature, you really have to try harder....
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterpixie View Post

I will repeat - The CPL directly helped 55,500 cats last year and indirectly helped thousands more. You have no room to critize as you have officially helped -1 cats.



The cats protection have a difficult choice to make, they can take in hard to rehome cats over easier cats and help less over all or they can weight their waiting list in favour of cats that will be in and out in a few weeks and help thousands more. Many of the big shelters do this and it is a system open to question but it is not fraud, they are honest about it if asked. It is not their fault that people do not understand the lifelong implecations of breeding and ownership.



YOU don't seem to understand that an animal should be for life, you have decided to fail your cat because she no longer suits your lifestyle. You ranting about how the CPL has 'dropped the ball' could discourage people from giving and rehomeing from them which is wrong since it is YOU who has failed your cat.



No, the CPL advertises a no destroy policy and thats a lie. They only rehome a few cats when they can manage it, the rest are on their own.



Yes, the cat in questions life is now not pleasant because her owner (my wife) died of cancer in May. She didn't know she was going to die or even contract cancer when she adopted the cat in 5 years ago. She should have gazed into that crystal ball and seen cancer in the future and not have adopted the cat. Whoops! Now the cat sits and looks out of the window and pines. She's lost weight. Shes becoming less socialized. I do my best but the cat bonded to my wife, not me.



And isn't this what the CPL is supposed to be here for? For just this sort of unforseen circumstance? Why else are they around for then? To handle the easy cases?



You can bet my telephone calls would be returned if I was making a donation. But put them to work to actually rehome a cat in trying circumstances? Oh thats a bit of a bother, isn't it? Better to let the RSPCA do their dirty work for them.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by counting_hours View Post

WOW....



I would reccomend prehaps, hiring a pet-sitter? Someone who does a little more than just drop off food, someone who will cuddle/love on/care for the cat when you can not.

The cat is your responsability. Not that of a charity, a shelter or anyone else. You made the choice to take in a living being who is entirely dependant on you. It isn't like a car, or a peice of furniture. You can not just get rid of it when it no longer suits your needs.

How about, if you are intent on rehoming, placing a newspaper ad, or some such thing, and TALK to the person. Visit their home, have them come and meet the cat first, if you find someone willing to adopt.

Do not just dump him or her out on the shelter because you no longer find her life to be convenient. You knowingly made lifestyle changes, and that is NOT your cats fault.

I see at the shelter I volunteer at tons of older cats, some who have lived for 10 or more years in a nice home with caretakers. The animals, it is obvious when they are crying in their cages desperate for attention, or left in a box outside the door at night with their fancy collars and healthy appearance, that these cats, for whatever reason, stopped being a convenience to their owners, and the people they have been dedicated companions for years on end for, simply did not care enough. So they lay in a tiny cage all day, unable to compete with the kittens (who are far too abundant as well) and just sort of...close in on themselves, stop eating, stop moving, washing themselves. The shelter I volunteer at doesnt even euth unless it is health or temperment reasons....



Please, I know you are trying harder than many, but with a living breathing creature, you really have to try harder....



I did not adopt this cat. The person that has adopted this cat has died. The cat is currently very unhappy. The cat is currently living in an unsuitable home. The cat needs to be rehomed.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
No, the CPL advertises a no destroy policy and thats a lie. They only rehome a few cats when they can manage it, the rest are on their own.



As far as I know the CPL does operate a non-destruction policy for the healthy cats in their care. If you have evidence suggesting otherwise then contact the charitys commission http://www.charity-commission.gov.uk/ rather than discrediting a charity that many animals depend on in a public forum. Last time a checked 55,500 felines is not 'a few to manage'



Quote:
Yes, the cat in questions life is now not pleasant because her owner (my wife) died of cancer in May. She didn't know she was going to die or even contract cancer when she adopted the cat in 5 years ago. She should have gazed into that crystal ball and seen cancer in the future and not have adopted the cat. Whoops! Now the cat sits and looks out of the window and pines. She's lost weight. Shes becoming less socialized. I do my best but the cat bonded to my wife, not me.



I am so sorry to hear about your wife, obviously a terrible event for both you and the cat. I am sorry if my previous comments were a bit harsh. Try the CPL central help email or helpline - helpline@cats.org.uk 08702 099 099 and explain your situation in full. I would imagine they will almost certainly get back to you. If in a few weeks you have no luck then PM me and I may be able to help (I've got contacts )





Quote:
And isn't this what the CPL is supposed to be here for? For just this sort of unforseen circumstance? Why else are they around for then? To handle the easy cases?



They cannot help every cat, they are a rescue with finite resources. I would imagine that, like most rescues, they are feeling the credit crunch pretty hard. The first thing some people seem to get rid off are their animals and with the lack of money they fail to neuter their cats or donate to charitys. I heard from a friend the other day who had a call from a top ragdoll cat breeder asking if she could rehome a couple of 16 week old kittens because the breeder couldn't even give them away. If pedigree kittens with letters after their name can't find homes then what chance do moggies have!



Quote:
You can bet my telephone calls would be returned if I was making a donation. But put them to work to actually rehome a cat in trying circumstances? Oh thats a bit of a bother, isn't it? Better to let the RSPCA do their dirty work for them.



The RSPCA are by no means perfect and a none destruction policy at any rescue should be respected, some rescues like to put all their resources into helping animals rather than killing them.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiz View Post

Wow. So suddenly you find having a pet an inconvenience to your lifestyle so you want to just dump it off at the local shelter and then get miffed when they won't return your phone calls with in 35 seconds of you having rang?



When I lived in Sydney I did a lot of work for the Australian branch of the CPA and you have absolutely and utterly no idea of the sheer number of abandoned cats in this world. There is just no what the CPA or any shelter can take care of them all. You know what? If it wasn't for irresponsible owners who see cats as object that they can dump on the nearest shelter the moment they get bored we'd only have half the problem we have.



Yeah well, you're bored with your cat and can't be bothered looking after her any more. Well, get off your fat arse and rehome her yourself rather than passing the buck and relying on someone to do it for you.



You're the one that "dropped the ball" here, not an overworked shelter that is struggling to cope with numbers of genuinely homeless cats. These shelters are for the truly needy animals, not a convenience for someone who suddenly decided their animal no longer goes with their decor.



Unbelievable.
post #17 of 24
i'm really sorry about your poor cats situation. she must be really upset and missing her lap time. if my mum sat on her bum a bit more, and we didn't already have cats who might stress yours out, i'd ask her to think about driving over to wales and getting her.



have you thought about asking in a local old folks home/community, and offering to continue to cover food and vet fees for the remainder of the cats years? cats can be really theraputic for old people, and a lot of them aren't too active and wouldn't mind a lot of cat cuddles. plus taking the burden of financial care off might sweeten the deal for them.
post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterpixie View Post

As far as I know the CPL does operate a non-destruction policy for the healthy cats in their care. If you have evidence suggesting otherwise then contact the charitys commission http://www.charity-commission.gov.uk/ rather than discrediting a charity that many animals depend on in a public forum. Last time a checked 55,500 felines is not 'a few to manage'







I am so sorry to hear about your wife, obviously a terrible event for both you and the cat. I am sorry if my previous comments were a bit harsh. Try the CPL central help email or helpline - helpline@cats.org.uk 08702 099 099 and explain your situation in full. I would imagine they will almost certainly get back to you. If in a few weeks you have no luck then PM me and I may be able to help (I've got contacts )









They cannot help every cat, they are a rescue with finite resources. I would imagine that, like most rescues, they are feeling the credit crunch pretty hard. The first thing some people seem to get rid off are their animals and with the lack of money they fail to neuter their cats or donate to charitys. I heard from a friend the other day who had a call from a top ragdoll cat breeder asking if she could rehome a couple of 16 week old kittens because the breeder couldn't even give them away. If pedigree kittens with letters after their name can't find homes then what chance do moggies have!







The RSPCA are by no means perfect and a none destruction policy at any rescue should be respected, some rescues like to put all their resources into helping animals rather than killing them.



I really don't see how they can be saving 55,000 cats a year when the can't even be bothered to answer the telephone or return calls. Just think of how many more they could save if they worked out that whole telephone issue?



I just called them again yesterday and they said 'Oh, the lady that does that isn't available today. Can you call back tomorrow?'. So the evasion and runaround continues.



How many telephone calls have I made so far? A dozen? I've even tried to contact the CPL in the next county with no luck.



I'm determined to find a good home for the cat so I'm kicking up a fuss and making multiple phone calls. But how many other people have called the local CPL and have gotten teh runaround and then simply got fed up and then dropped the cats off at an RSPCA or worse? This is the thing that really bothers me.



Perhaps its just the CPL chapters in my area are all poorly run. Maybe a call into the central CPL would be a good thing to at least alert them that whomever is running things in my area isn't up to the task.
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

i'm really sorry about your poor cats situation. she must be really upset and missing her lap time. if my mum sat on her bum a bit more, and we didn't already have cats who might stress yours out, i'd ask her to think about driving over to wales and getting her.



have you thought about asking in a local old folks home/community, and offering to continue to cover food and vet fees for the remainder of the cats years? cats can be really theraputic for old people, and a lot of them aren't too active and wouldn't mind a lot of cat cuddles. plus taking the burden of financial care off might sweeten the deal for them.



Thanks for that. I have put the word out to the community (small town jungle drums travel very far and are very effective) and have approached a few people with this sort of thing in mind but the homes that think this is a good idea already have cats. I've offered everyone food and vet bills and everything else but to no avail.



My last hope (I'm continuing to try the CPL but am not hopeful of any results) is to put an ad in the local paper. But I am apprehensive about this as there is no screening involved. Somebody could call me up posing as a kindly family only to take the cat and neglect it. Thats what the CPL are supposed to be good at: screening potential owners.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFalafel View Post

Thanks for that. I have put the word out to the community (small town jungle drums travel very far and are very effective) and have approached a few people with this sort of thing in mind but the homes that think this is a good idea already have cats. I've offered everyone food and vet bills and everything else but to no avail.



My last hope (I'm continuing to try the CPL but am not hopeful of any results) is to put an ad in the local paper. But I am apprehensive about this as there is no screening involved. Somebody could call me up posing as a kindly family only to take the cat and neglect it. Thats what the CPL are supposed to be good at: screening potential owners.





this must be so frustrating. we've dealt with the CPL in Somerset a few times in the last couple years, and they've been nothing but great. we've had a feral tomcat caught, spayed and re-released (he was getting on a bit, and would not have been happy in a home), they even managed to rehome a half feral cantankerous little cat which had been abandoned on our street and which my mum had patiently trained to just pounce on, and not actually try and eat passing strangers. she is apparently living a wonderful life after flouncing off and moving in with the neighbour of the person who adopted it (who didn't even know he liked cats, but the cat told him he does, hehehe).



i'm glad you're really plugging away at it. i don't know whats up with the CPL there, but i'm really disapointed by your experience. i'd definately talk to someone higher up the line, cos if they're failing someone who is perciverant and motivated to do the right thing, i dread to think how many people who aren't so pro-active and get this sort of 'help' from them give up at the first hurdle and do something awful like just moving away and leaving their cats behind, and how many people are getting the same treatment who are trying to adopt cats, too.
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
I finally had a good talk with the local director of the CPL. And yes, they are overwhelmed with cats right now. She told me some horror stories of recently abandoned pets. But what was frustrating is that she spend 2 seconds looking me up and sure enough I was on file and my emails were all recorded. Its just that no one had gotten back to me at all even though they told me they would. I did not press this point as she muttered some words about being frustrated with some of her local volunteer staff. Fine.



She passed along some advice but I am essentially on my own. This is compounded further by the fact that I have just started a job that has me out of town monday through friday and will soon include international travel. I've put ads up in vets, and other places around town but haven't heard a peep.



But we have a happy respite: my neice is more than happy to live at my house during the week as its close to her college. She now brings her mates along to watch DVDs and spend the night feeling like a grown up in her own flat Mon-Friday. The cat has new friends and more laps to sit on than ever before.
post #22 of 24
Good to hear that the cat has some mates now! Every time I run into a cat lover, I've been saying "You wouldn't perchance be looking for a new feline friend?"
The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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post #23 of 24
Good news! The force is with you!

I no longer post here after the 2012 schism and exodus. (See my profile.) 

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I no longer post here after the 2012 schism and exodus. (See my profile.) 

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post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

Good news! The force is with you!



The cat is all black...just like Darth Vader
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