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Is TVP a healthy choice?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I came across this article written by Mike Adams way back in May 2006 which I find quite disturbing about TVP. As I'm relatively new to this forum, I'm not sure if anyone had raised query about the healthy aspect of TVP.



http://www.newstarget.com/019400.html



I always thought TVP is something like wheat gluten - protein rich but not advisable to consume too much because somehow our digestive system doesn't take well to it - may cause bloating or indigestion.



could anyone enlighten me on this one? :-)
post #2 of 24
It all depends on what your goals are, nutritionally. Personally, I avoid it.
"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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post #3 of 24
i don't eat it very much, it makes me really bloated if i don't rinse it about a billion times, it often comes with msg in the seasonings, and its a bit of a pain in the arse to prepare. i doubt its amazingly good for you- its really quite processed, but so is a lot of other stuff.



i don't know how valid his rabbit test was though- like a commenter said, if he put it out dry, it'd be like wood chippings, i woulnd't eat it like that either. also, the rabbits might avoid it because it'd swell up and give them tummy ache as their bodies tried to reconstitute it. i'm pretty sure you shouldn't give some grains to birds for the same reasons.
post #4 of 24
It's a highly processed soy product and there's a little concern over the benzene used to process it. (There's negligible benzene left once the processing is done.)



While I don't entirely avoid it, I do believe the healthiest soybean product is edamame. The more processed a product is, the more its benefits have been removed.
post #5 of 24
Rabbits?! What?!

If we're following what rabbits eat shall we start eating our own poos?



TVP has never really appealed to me, and doesnt seem too healthy (overly processed, probably full of additives) but really, rabbits?!
post #6 of 24
The TVP we get has no seasonings or MSG in it. We only use it to make sloppy joes. And it isn't any trouble to prepare.
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"Women & cats will do as they please, & men & dogs should relax & get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein
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post #7 of 24
Do you get Bob's Red Mill? I have a bag of that back in California, I didn't bring it with me so I can't look at the ingredients. I was planning on making something with that sometime. I had no idea there was any problem with TVP!
post #8 of 24
The author of that article is a lunatic. He decides whether something is healthy based on whether wild rabbits will eat it out of his trash? That is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.



Perhaps herbivores don't realize that meat substitutes are actually not meat. Silly rabbits.
post #9 of 24
Trix are for kids?
post #10 of 24
I've read his site before. I think he's a passionate advocate for healthy eating, and probably has some decent advice in there somewhere, but I also think his research is highly flawed, and his conclusions are often down-right irresponsible.
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Nec Aspera Terrent
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post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
but somehow all vegetarian starter kits (PETA, veganoutreach, pcrm etc) promote TVP as delicious, healthy substitute for meats.



what about wheat glutens? are they as bad or better than TVP given it is also processed? What I know is that it takes many kg of wheat flour to produce one kg of gluten so that it lost most of its nutrients in water.
post #12 of 24
Wheat gluten, I like. I am fortunate enough to not have a sensitivity to it and I like the nutritional profile. Also, it is tasty with lemon, garlic, pepper, umeboshi and nutritional yeast.



It doesn't lose most of its nutrients in water. It is a nutritionally dense food.
"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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post #13 of 24
I like TVP in Chili, with tomato sauce on pasta, and it's good for sloppy joe too. Someone told me once that it has something in it that impairs chemical reactions in the brain but I have yet to find any information on that claim.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura Ng View Post

I always thought TVP is something like wheat gluten - protein rich but not advisable to consume too much because somehow our digestive system doesn't take well to it - may cause bloating or indigestion.





I find that I don't have any problems with bloating or indigestion with TVP.
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post #15 of 24
I don't eat a lot of it because it's obviously uber-processed, but I think it's probably better for you than ground beef.



Quote:
Originally Posted by chryssiie718 View Post

The TVP we get has no seasonings or MSG in it. We only use it to make sloppy joes. And it isn't any trouble to prepare.



Same here! I also make "meatballs" with it. I buy it in bulk from Whole Foods.
post #16 of 24
Fortunately, with gluten, only water is needed to separate the starch from the wheat protein. Is that how it's done industrially? I honestly don't know. (There's usually more than one way to do something and the way we do it at home is usually not the fastest. That would be a good point of research for me.) I have to agree with *AHIMSA* here. It is a nutritonally dense food, and it's quite versatile. The only bad thing I could say for it is it's obviously not a whole food.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura Ng View Post

but somehow all vegetarian starter kits (PETA, veganoutreach, pcrm etc) promote TVP as delicious, healthy substitute for meats.



what about wheat glutens? are they as bad or better than TVP given it is also processed? What I know is that it takes many kg of wheat flour to produce one kg of gluten so that it lost most of its nutrients in water.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Muse View Post

I don't eat a lot of it because it's obviously uber-processed, but I think it's probably better for you than ground beef.



Awesome way of bringing things into perspective. There's no debate there!
post #18 of 24
I've never had TVP, and I never intend to. Again like what most people say, it's an overly processed soy product, and I don't desire meat or any kind of meat analogue.



It's best to eat whole, fresh foods. Your body will thank you.
post #19 of 24
Yeah, I don't eat very many processed foods. I've tried TVP before in chili, but didn't like it much. I can't imagine it's terribly healthy for you, but I haven't heard anything really bad concerning it.
post #20 of 24
It's obviously not as good for you as say, fresh edamame, but it's nutritionally dense, cheaper than ground beef (I <3 bulk food stores) and is relatively innocuous in many things since it doesn't add much flavor and I don't think it changes the texture drastically. I put it in chili and spaghetti sauce and make 'sloppy joes' with it. It provides good protein and is easy to find and has a much better protein to fat ratio.

post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
so is seitan and wheat gluten the same food?
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura Ng View Post

so is seitan and wheat gluten the same food?



To make seitan, you mix wheat gluten with water (50-50), and simmer it for a good long while in some sort of seasoned broth...



That would be like saying wheat flour and bread are the same thing.
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For without it, we would be lost.
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Give thanks to Mother Earth for Her greatest gift...

...gravity.

For without it, we would be lost.
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post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovelyPerv View Post

To make seitan, you mix wheat gluten with water (50-50), and simmer it for a good long while in some sort of seasoned broth...



That would be like saying wheat flour and bread are the same thing.



Some of us use the terms "gluten" and "seitan" interchangeably. I had heard "gluten" used long before I knew what "seitan" was.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura Ng View Post

I came across this article written by Mike Adams way back in May 2006 which I find quite disturbing about TVP. As I'm relatively new to this forum, I'm not sure if anyone had raised query about the healthy aspect of TVP.



http://www.newstarget.com/019400.html



I always thought TVP is something like wheat gluten - protein rich but not advisable to consume too much because somehow our digestive system doesn't take well to it - may cause bloating or indigestion.



could anyone enlighten me on this one? :-)



I had a side-thought about that article a while after I posted in this thread.



His rabbits didn't eat it...



...and I'm sure it had nothing to do with the fact that dried TVP tastes like sh*t.



I wonder if the rabbits would have eaten it if he had prepared the TVP, and make a fruity salad for them?
Give thanks to Mother Earth for Her greatest gift...

...gravity.

For without it, we would be lost.
Reply
Give thanks to Mother Earth for Her greatest gift...

...gravity.

For without it, we would be lost.
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