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Bell peppers: green vs red

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I've read the claim, albeit from a dubious source, that one shouldn't eat green bell peppers because they aren't ripe -- only red ones. Comments?
post #2 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony11 View Post

I've read the claim, albeit from a dubious source, that one shouldn't eat green bell peppers because they aren't ripe -- only red ones. Comments?

Technicly speaking and I am assumeing you are talking about bell peppers here the green peppers are not ripe, however they are mature and there is no reason why you should not be able to eat a green one just because it is not ripe.

Unless you are following a must be compleatly ripe diet which I am not sure is even out there but I'm sure there is a diet for everything.



The only marked differance between a green bell and a red bell is its level of sweetness , a fully ripe pepper has less bitter qualities and more sweet, it dosnt matter if its ripe color is red,ywllow,brown or white they do not cary much.



But in case your wondering there are no negative health issues with eating ripe verces unripe.
post #3 of 25
I'm not aware of any reason not to eat green bell peppers - I've eaten many of them - but I do prefer red because of the increased sweetness.
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post #4 of 25
Blegh. Neither.
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Mind you, I'm not all that fond of them but figure I should eat them for variety in my diet. A certain rawxploiter says to not eat them green because they aren't ripe and leaves it at that.
post #6 of 25
Sounds silly to me. I do like red better but green can be nice in a cooked dish.
post #7 of 25
I like the green for chili and red for salad. Green is cheaper so I buy them and allow them to ripen on the counter.



As far as whether one is better for you, I haven't heard any reference to it before. So if the person who mentioned it doesn't have anything to back it up, I wouldn't worry to much about it and eat what you enjoy.



Mmmm, this is making me hungry for sliced bell peppers.
post #8 of 25
Am i the only one that prefers orange?
post #9 of 25
I've never heard that before and don't believe it, though I will admit that some varieties of green Bell peppers make me burp (and they are the ONLY food to do so - fortunate for me, green Bell peppers are also the only food I don't like). Still, I've never heard of anyone being done substantial harm.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTC View Post

Am i the only one that prefers orange?

No, I like orange too. I am an equal opportunity bell pepper eater.
post #11 of 25
I'm partial to yellow myself!
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post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nigel View Post

I've never heard that before and don't believe it, though I will admit that some varieties of green Bell peppers make me burp (and they are the ONLY food to do so - fortunate for me, green Bell peppers are also the only food I don't like). Still, I've never heard of anyone being done substantial harm.

Same here! They give me indigesion and they are the only thing I really don't care for because of it...Okay, I don't like durian either but just because I think it tastes like creamy green onions not because it makes me have indigestion



MYC, orange are my favorites
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post #13 of 25
I'm partial to the fugue.
post #14 of 25
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nightshade



Green peppers are supposed to contain more of the toxic alkaloids found in the Nightshade family of plants than red peppers. The green means it's immature and not ready to eat. I've eaten tons of green peppers and never noticed anything bad, but perhaps some people might be more prone to issues with the toxins. I stopped eating them anyway. There are some other sites with questionable information if you search for "nightshade vegetables." The fruit is generally okay to eat as long as it's ripe.



Is this what you were asking about?
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zasko View Post

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nightshade



Green peppers are supposed to contain more of the toxic alkaloids found in the Nightshade family of plants than red peppers. The green means it's immature and not ready to eat. I've eaten tons of green peppers and never noticed anything bad, but perhaps some people might be more prone to issues with the toxins. I stopped eating them anyway. There are some other sites with questionable information if you search for "nightshade vegetables." The fruit is generally okay to eat as long as it's ripe.



Is this what you were asking about?



This applies to everything in the Solanacea family: Capsicums (pepper), potatos, tobacco, tomatos, mandrake, nightshade, datura, and eggplant (there are more). They all are heavy in alkaloids.



I just read your link and couldn't find the reference to green Bell peppers having more alkaloids than the red. I'd appreciate it if you pointed it out.
post #16 of 25
I'm not sure if this is true, which is why I didn't reference it directly. Sorry, but here are some links you can take with a grain of salt.



http://www.archure.net/salus/nightshade.html



http://www.deliciousorganics.com/Con...nightshade.htm



http://www.innvista.com/health/foods...es/nightsh.htm



I'm guessing since green potatoes and green tomatoes contain more of the toxins that green bell peppers also do? Honestly, I don't know much about this. If someone has a better source than the internet about green bell peppers, then please inform us?
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zasko View Post

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nightshade



Green peppers are supposed to contain more of the toxic alkaloids found in the Nightshade family of plants than red peppers. The green means it's immature and not ready to eat. I've eaten tons of green peppers and never noticed anything bad, but perhaps some people might be more prone to issues with the toxins. I stopped eating them anyway. There are some other sites with questionable information if you search for "nightshade vegetables." The fruit is generally okay to eat as long as it's ripe.



Is this what you were asking about?

Probably. I do know people who won't eat any nightshades, and others who won't eat any alliums. Both of course think the other is crazy.



Note that I'm talking about bell peppers, which are sold green, yellow, orange, and red -- not about chilies.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zasko View Post




I'm guessing since green potatoes and green tomatoes contain more of the toxins that green bell peppers also do? Honestly, I don't know much about this. If someone has a better source than the internet about green bell peppers, then please inform us?





I've been heavily researching this type of material for some time now, preparing for a publication that discusses how american foods went abroad and changed after contact between the eastern and western hemispheres. Chiles, Potatoes, Maize, and Tomatoes are the focus.



Bell peppers, off the top of my head, were located around Panama in the late 17th century and considered a major food item. The problem with early food histories is that they suggest some staticness in the foods being discovered. Though the pepper was called a "Bell Pepper" I doubt it was the 0 Scovile ranked pepper we know of today.



In modern times, when Bell peppers are far more prolific, they are bred to stay green, or get red, yellow, or orange, and hold. If you do get a green one that's starting to turn another color, buy it. It's a free spirit! And will prolly taste pretty good.



Potatoes turn green because they are ready to sprout. They have gone from an eat-me mode to I'm-a-parent mode. The green is, among other thing, a buildup of chlorophyll that will help the spuds sprout again. This makes them bitter. Put'em in your compost heap. They'll be happy there and you might get some nice new potatoes out of the deal.



Books:



on Peppers : Jean Andrews wrote 2: the first is the best and has nice pictures

on potatoes: Zuckerman wrote a light book, but the tome is "The History and Social Influence of the Potato" by Salaman.



On the history of indigenous American foods in general, you can't beat Sophie Coe's "History of America's first Cuisines."
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony11 View Post

Note that I'm talking about bell peppers, which are sold green, yellow, orange, and red -- not about chilies.



Yup, I meant the bell peppers along with the hotter variety.



Soon as my semester ends, I'll go hunt down those books and skim for information. Green bell peppers have that distinctive taste that the red/orange/yellows don't and I'd love to eat them again. I'd just like more information to rest any fears I have of them. It's given me time to explore other food items.



Good luck with your publication! Let us know when it's finished so we can bask in your glory. Chiles and tomatoes are some of my favorite fruits!
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
Semi-related question: is there a name for those little detached bits of pepper that sometimes lurk in the center?
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony11 View Post

Semi-related question: is there a name for those little detached bits of pepper that sometimes lurk in the center?



During the eighteenth centuary, an undercover American agent named Benjamin Stiles worked for His Royalty's Food and Drink in Britain which catered exclusively for the King. You may know during this time America was trying to break free from British rule. It was decided to find a way to poison the King of Britain to gain the upperhand. It took us (americans) nearly a decade to get someone into the Food and Drink system. Once settled, American scientists worked feverishly to come up with a food that looked harmless but was actually 100% guaranteed deadly to even a full grown elephant. Eventually scientists were able to breed a bell pepper that contained what is known as a "dipord," a little detached bit of pepper that sometimes lurks in the center.



Not all was succesful, sometimes the dipord would come out a different color than the bell pepper. This slight uncertainty never found its way to the top US officials due to the various lazy informers and defective bureaucracies that made up the then current system. The bell pepper set sail across the Atlantic and given to Benjamin. The agent approached the King and handed him the bell pepper with the deadly dipord inside. Grinning widely in a display of twisted and rotten teeth, the King brought the pepper to his mouth and bit heartily. Benjamin noticed the King missed the dipord in the initial bite! "What's this green detached bit of pepper lurking in the center of my yellow bell pepper?? Off with his head!!" roared the King as he pointed promptly at Benjamin!



In retaliation, British rule decided to infect all of the American bell pepper crops with the dipord variety. Much of the infection was eradicated during the early part of the last centuary, yet we sometimes will find dipords in our peppers. Hope that clears things up.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
I must admit that I'm not sure if you've made that up or not.
post #23 of 25
I eat both nightshades and alliums with great relish. Sometimes I make them INTO a great relish.



I have heard, though, that eating nightshades before surgery makes it harder for the body to cope with the anesthesia. I can personally vouch for that, although my experience is hardly a valid study. When I underwent emergency surgery for my broken ankle, I hadn't had any in the prior 48 hours, and I woke quickly and easily after surgery, with minimal pain. I had to go back a year later for another (scheduled) surgery, and I ate all my favorite foods the day before,which included a potato dish and a tomato dish. Lord, the difference!



I also hear many arthritis sufferers are extremely sensitive to nightshades. There could also be a connection for other people suffering from auto-immune disorders.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony11 View Post

I must admit that I'm not sure if you've made that up or not.



Yeah I made that up based on your question. I have no clue what those things in the peppers are called.
post #25 of 25
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