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I would like to live on a commune!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Living on a vegan commune has been something I've been thinking about for a long time. I wish it were possible. Wouldn't that be wonderful? Living in a green, beautiful place surrounded with mountains and peace loving vegans, growing our own produce and living in harmony? Is this just a stupid pipe dream, or could it become reality?



I think that would be so wonderful. Everyone would be accepted regardless of race, religion or sexual orientation.



It was done in the 60's why not now?



Everyone could use public transportation, bicycles, or share a hybrid car, and share money equally among the commune.



That would be bliss to me.



I just wanted to get that out of my system. If anyone else feels the same way, share what your ideal commune would be like.
post #2 of 25
There are some still around. I've always liked the idea and I've liked it more and more these past couple years. Living in the "mainstream" just doesn't seem to suit me much anymore. It would be great to be around a lot of like-minded people, too. It's very encouraging.
post #3 of 25
I had a friend that did this for almost two years out of college. She loved it and worked hard in the garden. It was like a big happy family.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goettling View Post

I had a friend that did this for almost two years out of college. She loved it and worked hard in the garden. It was like a big happy family.

Where is the commune? I'm seriously considering doing this. Did it cost much? Did everyone have a job and contribute their earnings? Is there an age limit? I'd really love this.
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by catgirl67 View Post

Where is the commune? I'm seriously considering doing this. Did it cost much? Did everyone have a job and contribute their earnings? Is there an age limit? I'd really love this.



It was here in Missouri. She was like maybe 22 or 23 at that time. They had a lot of land. They put her up in a house. Everything was paid. Her job was to work in the garden. She had no bills at all. She had a green thumb. She worked in the garden and that was how she was payed and taken care of. Kinda like the barter system. I just remembered that she loved it.



I can call her and find out more details if you want. She got married later and has two kids. She is a vegetarian chef the last I heard.
post #6 of 25
there are a few veg*n intentional communities here on the Big Island. Most of them are known to be rather dysfunctional - petty squabbles, psycho-manipulative leaders, etc...



the ones that are successful tend to be the ones that keep to themselves, it seems.
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post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goettling View Post

It was here in Missouri. She was like maybe 22 or 23 at that time. They had a lot of land. They put her up in a house. Everything was paid. Her job was to work in the garden. She had no bills at all. She had a green thumb. She worked in the garden and that was how she was payed and taken care of. Kinda like the barter system. I just remembered that she loved it.



I can call her and find out more details if you want. She got married later and has two kids. She is a vegetarian chef the last I heard.

I would love that! I'm sick of living in Houston. It's toxic and a concrete jungle. My family may object, but they and I aren't all that close. I would love to get back to nature and get closer to God and get healthier and live with cool people. I hope they don't mind a 39 year old fart living there.



Thanks geottling! That info would be really helpful.
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WonderRandy View Post

there are a few veg*n intentional communities here on the Big Island. Most of them are known to be rather dysfunctional - petty squabbles, psycho-manipulative leaders, etc...



the ones that are successful tend to be the ones that keep to themselves, it seems.

I'd love to live in Hawaii, but I have a feeling that the ones who keep to themselves only accept natives. I may be wrong. I'm sure I couldn't afford the airfare to get there!
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by catgirl67 View Post

I would love that! I'm sick of living in Houston. It's toxic and a concrete jungle. My family may object, but they and I aren't all that close. I would love to get back to nature and get closer to God and get healthier and live with cool people. I hope they don't mind a 39 year old fart living there.



Thanks geottling! That info would be really helpful.

ETA: As long as it's not a cultish or Charlie Manson type of commune,I am really interested.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by catgirl67 View Post

ETA: As long as it's not a cultish or Charlie Manson type of commune,I am really interested.



Oh heck no. lol That is what I was thinking when I posted this. These things can almost sound like a cultish thing. lol. Trust me, nothing like that went on.



I am sure that there is some things like that though. I am down with cults.



It was mostly about taking care of each other and what not. I think it could be a good thing for a single person to do. It was people that worked together with the same interest. They took care of each other with respect and it all worked out as time past. They learned a lot.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goettling View Post

Oh heck no. lol That is what I was thinking when I posted this. These things can almost sound like a cultish thing. lol. Trust me, nothing like that went on.



I am sure that there is some things like that though. I am down with cults.



It was mostly about taking care of each other and what not. I think it could be a good thing for a single person to do. It was people that worked together with the same interest. They took care of each other with respect and it all worked out as time past. They learned a lot.

I would love some more info. Please contact your friend and ask her if it's still operating. I long to leave the city behind!
post #12 of 25
Just for you I will make the phone call. This is my X best friends sister that did this. We still talk from time to time. Give me a couple of days if we play phone tag. And also this is good for me also because I have wanted to talk to her and see how she was doing.



I just wrote it down on my to do list.
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goettling View Post

Just for you I will make the phone call. This is my X best friends sister that did this. We still talk from time to time. Give me a couple of days if we play phone tag. And also this is good for me also because I have wanted to talk to her and see how she was doing.



I just wrote it down on my to do list.

Thanks so much
post #14 of 25
here is a directory of intential communities (communes) some are also co-housing which I guess is kind of like a village? http://directory.ic.org/ anyway hope this helps
post #15 of 25
Check out the Farm in Summersville (or is it Summertown), TN



Though technically not a commune anymore, it was a commune for most of its history and they are very open to visitors, though I don't now how easy it is to get them to let you settle down into the community.



I've thought about moving there myself though I can't do that now since I have to go to jail soon and then I'll be getting deported to Canada.



The U.S. govt really doesn't like people who like to eat mushrooms.
post #16 of 25
They are no longer called communes, which i lived in back in the day. They are now called Intentional Communities. If you a google you will come back with many links. They are alive and well and all over the country. There are vegan and non vegan ones. They mostly have their own cottage industries that they use to support the community. Some make nut butters, others make hammocks, and yet others do organics seeds, among many things. Search and ye shall find.

here's one site that lists many: http://www.ic.org/

I have a friend who lives at Dancing Rabbit. And my son has stayed at Wildroots.
post #17 of 25
sorry, didn't see the earlier post with this link. Oh well! check out Dancing Rabbit and Twin Oaks
post #18 of 25
I toured the Twin Oaks IC in southern Virginia a few years ago.



http://directory.ic.org/records/?act...record_id=1216



Quite fascinating, and definitely not paradise. I spoke at length with one of the residents regarding current challenges facing the community. The basic problem is that even the most earnest, giving, and compassionate people are still needy and comfort-loving. Throw a bunch of these folks together, and you have a pot ready to boil over.



I decided that it wasn't for me, but I was glad that they were there to encourage folks to think "outside the box" regarding living possibilities for humans.
post #19 of 25
Yeah. The Farm in Tennessee is the one I've heard the most about.
post #20 of 25
The idea does sound nice. It's very ideal I think for people like us, but as much as I like the idea I think I'd be a little too careful of living in one just because you never know the kind of people you are getting invovled with.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAteMyVeggies View Post

Check out the Farm in Summersville (or is it Summertown), TN



Though technically not a commune anymore, it was a commune for most of its history and they are very open to visitors, though I don't now how easy it is to get them to let you settle down into the community.



I've thought about moving there myself though I can't do that now since I have to go to jail soon and then I'll be getting deported to Canada.



The U.S. govt really doesn't like people who like to eat mushrooms.





I was about to say "THE FARM!" Oh, I want to live there!
post #22 of 25
I was almost ready to move into a quasi-commune in the middle of Chicago--I know, an odd place for one, but it was really into outreach and serving the poor--but I decided not to for the following reasons:



--They used public healthcare or none at all. Sometimes that's the same thing. If you live far from an established city in the case of a rural commune, how will you get help if you need it? Is the risk of not getting help prohibitive? If it isn't, how do you know you won't get sick or hurt?

--Something seemed fishy about the tax structure there. They had their own lawyers to took care of everyone's tax filings. Quite frankly, since I'm legally responsible for the errors my tax preparer makes, I may as well do it myself with input from more seasoned taxpayers.

--Though I would have had the option to pick up a paying part-time job in addition to working in the community, it would not have been enough to both save for medical emergencies and retirement. Would this commune take care of you in your old age, provided that you were still living there? What if you lived there 20 years and then it turned into a sick cult? Then you're out on the street with nothing but memories.

--What precautions do they take for safety? Inner-city Chicago is known for being a relatively rough place. What about the surrounding area for your commune? Being surrounded by green growing things is no guarantee that the neighbors are hospitable.

--What about danger from within? Do they take in just anybody? If someone's violent because of substance-abuse issues, how will they protect you?

--Last but not least, how good are their cleanliness standards? I'm talking kitchen sanitation, bathrooms, clothes washing... People can be very nice and kind, but if the food prep areas are crawling with all manner of nasty things, you may want to look elsewhere or prepare your food separately.
"They call this war a cloud over the land. But they made the weather and then they stand in the rain and say '$#!±, it's raining!'"  Ruby, in "Cold Mountain"
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"They call this war a cloud over the land. But they made the weather and then they stand in the rain and say '$#!±, it's raining!'"  Ruby, in "Cold Mountain"
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post #23 of 25
FWIW, you may want to look into co-housing rather than a commune (www.cohousing.org). The site explains it better than I can, but basically people still own their own home/apartment, so they don't have to live with anyone else, or use a communal kitchen, etc. There are some common facilities, like a clubhouse and dining hall, and there are usually communal meals a few times a month, but you aren't required to participate. Most do, though, since that's kind of the point of the community.



I think the personal space provided by the co-housing concept allows the community to survive much longer than a commune (which, while they existed in the 60s, tended to fail miserably due to infighting). There are vegan cohousing communities around -- that might be a much better fit for you.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kachina View Post

FWIW, you may want to look into co-housing rather than a commune...



Yes, I also toured a co-housing community - much more to my liking. You're still liable to have arguments with co-residents over costs associated with the shared facilities (as in any condo association), but if the other folks are reasonable the probability of serious problems is low.
post #25 of 25
The co-housing situation is amazing to me. I love that idea. That's exactly the kind of thing I would like to do.
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