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How to Humanely Euthanize a Chicken  

post #1 of 53
Thread Starter 
I am so sad my chicky has a foot and leg disease and is unable to walk. He has been in this shape for over a week and I don't know what to do. I feel like he is suffering and needs to be put down. I have kept him confined to his own place away from the hen, with food and water in close range in hopes rest would help. It hasn't and I just feel so sorry for him. I called the vet and they told me they don't have anything to euthanize a chicken. I am sure I could call a bird vet that could help me, but I am so financially strapped right now unless it was $10 or $20 I wouldn't be able to afford to do it. I was just wondering if by any chance one of you know of a humane way I or my husband could put him down? I thought about belladonna, but unsure of the dosage. Any thoughts?
post #2 of 53




I don't mean to be rude, but that is just wrong. If you had a sick dog, would you kill it yourself as well?



Call around, find a vet who can do it, work out a payment plan. Sell your tv, stereo, computer, whatever. That's what a responsible pet owner would do. Not try and kill the poor thing yourself.
post #3 of 53
Thread Starter 
thanks for your much appreciated reply. Sure, I could take this chicken to the local poultry vet- she straps thier wings hangs them upside down by their feet and then kills them. Don't judge me, I asked a simple question here. If you don't have anything helpful to say please keep your responses to yourself
post #4 of 53
I don't think there's a humane way to euthanize your chicken at home. I know veterinary expenses can be costly, but that's part of the responsibility of caring for a pet. I'm sure the vet would be willing to work out a payment plan with you.



As for the type of responses you can expect, I just want to remind you that while we don't allow debate in the support forums, you can't expect everyone to agree with you.
We see the world as "we" are, not as "it" is; because it is the "I" behind the "eye" that does the seeing.
We see the world as "we" are, not as "it" is; because it is the "I" behind the "eye" that does the seeing.
post #5 of 53
^^^ What she & SilverC said.
post #6 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetashoney View Post

thanks for your much appreciated reply. Sure, I could take this chicken to the local poultry vet- she straps thier wings hangs them upside down by their feet and then kills them. Don't judge me, I asked a simple question here. If you don't have anything helpful to say please keep your responses to yourself

Your original post said nothing about how you disagree with the vet's technique. You only mentioned that you didn't want to pay for it.



I will repeat what I said: call around, find a vet who can do it the way you think best. Work out how you are going to pay for it.



You're on a veg/AR site asking how to kill a chicken and you don't think people are going to judge you?
post #7 of 53
I would call another vet. I don't know if I am convinced regular euthanasia wouldn't kill a chicken. I mean, what about morphine?



Either way it will cost money.
post #8 of 53
A sharp cleaver and a steady hand would do it. If you're not comfortable with that, then bring it to a vet.



Work out a payment plan with the vet. Most vets are very agreeable.



ETA: I don't expect her to actually kill it herself w/ the cleaver, so why support drugging it?
post #9 of 53
i'm so sorry your chicken is so ill and that you'll have to say goodbye.

really i'm not so sure the method of death matters much as long as it is quick and relatively painless. i also completely understand how hard it is to come up with money for vet bills. you need to do what's right for you. i hope it all goes smoothly and your chicken has a peaceful end. i'm sorry i don't know much about home euthanization but if you aren't squeamish i kind of agree with krista's sharp cleaver assessment. i don't think i could do that, though. but maybe you could. and there's nothing cheaper, faster or more painless (as far as i know).



bye, nice chicken. may you go to the happy scratching grounds.
post #10 of 53
I grew up with chicken farmers. If done with a steady and strong hand, it is swift.
post #11 of 53
What exactly is wrong with your chicken, there is (as far as I know) no disease widely known as "foot and leg" disease, but most leg problems in chickens are infections which are easily cleared up with antibiotics, or nutrition/weight problems all of these are prett easy fixes. I hate to be rude, but I know you're connected to the internet and have a computer, which could be vet money. I know its very difficult to come up with money, but at least try before you try an at home euthanasia. Aside from the method Krista has mentioned there really isn't a good way to kill an animal without talking to your vet. Belladonna and most other poisions aren't quick or painless.
post #12 of 53
Bird euthanasias are done with the same solution as cat/dog euthanasias. You just need to inject the solution directly into the bird's heart. Of course if your vet doesn't have euthasol for whatever bizarre reason, or is unable to find the heart of the chicken, I guess he wouldn't be able to do it. You don't necessarily need a specialist. Just a vet with euthasol and a long needle, and maybe basic knowledge of birds.
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http://megatarian.blogspot.com
post #13 of 53
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your responses. kreeli especially yours, it seems you and I are on the same wavelength about this.

I have done research online about my chickens problem and got recommendations from poultry association of virgina to do as I have done. Kept him secluded for the other chick, allowing him to rest-with food and water nearby. Actually this disease is pretty common in broiler chickens, its in the genes of the bird and since I got both my chickens from my fathers chicken farm it doesn't really surprise me. Its been more than a week with no signs of improvement. Thank you again for your replys
post #14 of 53
I would just like to point out that not all vets are willing to do a payment plan. The vet I currently take my animals to have a sign up that the bill is to be paid when services are rendered, absolutely NO payment plans are available. I think it's easy to tell somebody to sell their stuff and "do whatever it takes" when you yourself are not in that position.

Sweetashoney, I'm really sorry that your pet is ill. I just had to have my kitty put down a couple of weeks ago. I hope you are able to find a humane way to have your chicken put down. Carbon Monoxide asphyxiation is supposed to be painless, but I don't know how you would do that to a chicken. Just a thought.
post #15 of 53
Put him in the car and do that carbon monoxide thing that people sometimes do? I'm sorry this is so macabre--I can't think of anything else.



I'm so sorry about your pet. Losing a pet is so hard.
post #16 of 53
Carbon monoxide suffocates - I don't think it would be a pleasant death. The cleaver would be quicker and more humane, though it makes me shudder to say it.



I'm so sorry Chicky is ill. Are you absolutely sure there is nothing to be done? No local vet - or even a farmer - who might at least be able to prescribe antibiotics in the hope that it'll clear up?



I sincerely hope you find a solution to your problem and that, whatever happens, Chicky doesn't have to suffer.



Just a little advice - putting aside just a few dollars a month into a 'vet fund' might be a good idea just in case you have a problem in the future. It will be handy to have a little nest egg even if you can't afford the full cost of a treatment - although not all vets will accept a payment plan, I'm sure most would be amenable to accepting say, half the cost of treatment in advance, if you can assure them that the rest is to follow....
post #17 of 53
I've heard of carbon monoxide as well.



Put the chicken in a box, cut a hole in the box, and run a hose from the car to the box.



I'm not sure how human it is, but people commit suicide in the same fashion, and don't seem to suffer too much.



However, I strongly recommend finding a vet for this.
post #18 of 53
I am pretty sure a carbon monoxide death is not suffocation- it puts you to sleep and then you die.
post #19 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverC View Post





I don't mean to be rude, but that is just wrong. If you had a sick dog, would you kill it yourself as well?



Call around, find a vet who can do it, work out a payment plan. Sell your tv, stereo, computer, whatever. That's what a responsible pet owner would do. Not try and kill the poor thing yourself.



So what is so irresponsible about putting an end to the birds suffering on her own? What, it's not OK to kill it yourself but it's OK to have someone else do it?

If the bird is suffering, put it out of it's missery then and be done with the job.

A real responsible owner wouldn't let the thing suffer.

I'm with kristadb on this one. To hesitate in a situation like this is for the birds sake but for the sake of one's own queasiness over the matter. The bird won't know what hit it.



Jeffer
post #20 of 53
Uh... I would definitely NOT recommend the cleaver method unless you have experience killing chickens that way. I don't know much about it, but it sure sounds like things could go brutally wrong if you don't *really* know what you're doing.
post #21 of 53
sweetashoney, I'm really sorry for you and your poor chicky. I don't think I would ever take the risk of euthanizing any of my pets on my own, though. I hope you'll be able to find another affordable vet who does not kill chickens the way you described in your post above!
post #22 of 53
Sorry about your chicken. I had four elderly hens living here, and they got sick eventually.

My mum kept chickens too. In my experience they don't have much of a fighting for life instinct and die quite soon when their time is close. If he isn't in pain, I'd just nuture him. My mum kept an old hen who couldn't walk for a year before she faded away. That hen enjoyed that last year, she was hand fed, cuddled and had water brought to her beak three times a day. I took to calling her Queen Victoria.

We took one hen to the vet and had a medical inspection of her and medicine, the experience freaked her out and she still died.

Both me and my husband have euthanathiaised- killed- birds here. There is no way to make it beautiful. One way is to break their necks, which is harder than it sounds unless you've done it dozens of times, the other is with a cleaver. I don't recommend it unless they are in agony. I think chickens can rally if they are encouraged, or die quickly if they are ready to.

My greatgran used to slip one drop of brandy down the throat of any ailing hens and it often revived them. My mum fed hers cobwebs as they are antiseptic( or a similar word that I've forgotten, but that's been confirmed to me by a hospital doctor).



What do they do (if anything) on the chicken farm? Could you ask your father?

Best wishes for the chicken whatever happens.
post #23 of 53
Spud - I would not agree that they don't have much of a "fighting for life" instinct, if I understand what you mean. I think that chickens don't tend to show outwardly when they're in pain, as a survival mechanism - so you can't always tell when they are in deep pain. Thus it may seem that they die quickly, when they may have been hurting or struggling for awhile. But that's what I've heard.



OP - It seems best to try very hard to enlist the help of a vet who knows about birds. Hearing about your situation, they may offer helpful advice or even some very low cost service. I think at some point you may well look back and regret that you didn't do everything to try to make this animal's life or death more comfortable.



Whatever you do, don't take anyone's advice on the internet about dosages and such for how to kill your bird. You don't know if anyone knows what they're talking about, and you could cause so much pain.

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

Every animal you eat
was running for her life

post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffer View Post

So what is so irresponsible about putting an end to the birds suffering on her own? What, it's not OK to kill it yourself but it's OK to have someone else do it?

If the bird is suffering, put it out of it's missery then and be done with the job.

A real responsible owner wouldn't let the thing suffer.

I'm with kristadb on this one. To hesitate in a situation like this is for the birds sake but for the sake of one's own queasiness over the matter. The bird won't know what hit it.



Jeffer

Yes, the best thing to do is end the suffering as soon as possible but death might not be the only way, as someone earlier said. I would suggest that before doing anything you might regret, try to find out if your chicken can be healed. The best possible thing that can happen is for him/her to be healed and stop suffering, and of course not die. A vet can probably figure this out, so please find some way to pay for a vet. If you really love your chicken you'd do as much as you can right? And if what another person said is true about you having internet, that money could be vet money. Please find a way to take your chicken to a vet (or someone with vast knowledge about animals) so you can know if this disease can be reversed.
post #25 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffer View Post

So what is so irresponsible about putting an end to the birds suffering on her own? What, it's not OK to kill it yourself but it's OK to have someone else do it?

If the bird is suffering, put it out of it's missery then and be done with the job.

A real responsible owner wouldn't let the thing suffer.

I'm with kristadb on this one. To hesitate in a situation like this is for the birds sake but for the sake of one's own queasiness over the matter. The bird won't know what hit it.



Jeffer

So owners who don't want to pay for a vet should just take matters into their own hands? So you'd poison your dog or break your cat's neck or cut off your guinea pig's head?



It may be "just" a chicken, but it deserves proper medical care and a dignified, stress-free death. Sweetashoney is not a vet, and she cannot guarentee that for she'd be able to do the job properly or quickly enough.



Responsible owners take 'Ol Yeller' to the vet, they don't take him out back and kill him.
post #26 of 53
I brought a sick pet mouse to a vet to be put to sleep and it didn't cost me much at all.
post #27 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverC View Post

So owners who don't want to pay for a vet should just take matters into their own hands? So you'd poison your dog or break your cat's neck or cut off your guinea pig's head?



It may be "just" a chicken, but it deserves proper medical care and a dignified, stress-free death. Sweetashoney is not a vet, and she cannot guarentee that for she'd be able to do the job properly or quickly enough.



Responsible owners take 'Ol Yeller' to the vet, they don't take him out back and kill him.



And if you think about it, the options offered (cleaver, breaking neck, Carbon monoxide poisioning) aren't the most humane ways to kill an animal. Holding the chicken down to cut off the neck can't be fun for the chicken or shoving the chicken into a box to get the monoxide fumes. The most humane way is to go to a vet and have them give them a shot of whatever they do to euthanize them with minimal stress. The last moments of an animal's life should not be stressful and fearful and panicked.
post #28 of 53
I agree with you . But "The last moments of an animal's life should not be stressful and fearful and panicked" means the vet should be called in to home visit the chicken. The catching, caging, driving to the vet and hanging around to get in to the room where it's injected are frightening to a chicken.
post #29 of 53
I'm sorry to hear about your chicken.



How much did you vet want to charge you to euthanize him? This post is a few days old, so I'm sure you've already taken care of matters by now, I'm just curious what they were wanting to charge for such a procedure.
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by spud View Post

I agree with you . But "The last moments of an animal's life should not be stressful and fearful and panicked" means the vet should be called in to home visit the chicken. The catching, caging, driving to the vet and hanging around to get in to the room where it's injected are frightening to a chicken.



Quite true.
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