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Don't Feed The Strays

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
This was on my local news last night about a city near me:



http://www.wsiltv.com/p/news_details...10134&type=top



It is more than "feeding the strays" and giving people a fine for doing so will not help strays or people. A group has been made on facebook for people against this new ordinance and a petition will be made soon. The girl who made the group has also done an interview with the news channel so hopefully we will be a big enough voice so this ordinance won't be passed. We would like your support. If you are against this new ordinance of fining people who feed strays please join this group and contacting the city. There needs to be education and better spay/neuter laws.



Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/...16374521735586



Contact city: http://www.cityofmarionil.gov/contact.html
post #2 of 16
Ugh. I don't know how much the city will care about the opinion of people who don't live (and vote there), but I will add my voice.



I do agree that simply feeding doesn't help the animals as a whole - spay/neuter is a must, whether through an organized program or individually.
post #3 of 16
I'm against feeding strays without spaying/neutering them. If you keep feeding them and you don't spay/neuter (which, at least for males, is INCREDIBLY cheap and easy- there are whole clinics devoted to spay/neutering), they multiply rapidly and the homeless animal problem will never get better.



Actually, I'd rather not feed strays... most of the "strays" around here are feral and they hunt for themselves, which can be healthier for them and beneficial for us.
post #4 of 16
Wow, that's just stupid. I joined the group. What's with Illinois and being ridiculous about strays? First Evanston, now this. Spay/Neuter. Come on, people.

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Your KORRA mom KORRA said KORRA I KORRA could KORRA take KORRA you KORRA to KORRA the KORRA dance KORRA tonight.

Join Korra Nation and I promise I'll stop talking about Korra for 30 days.

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post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishmailbox View Post

I'm against feeding strays without spaying/neutering them. If you keep feeding them and you don't spay/neuter (which, at least for males, is INCREDIBLY cheap and easy- there are whole clinics devoted to spay/neutering), they multiply rapidly and the homeless animal problem will never get better.



If you're not the one doing the trapping and paying for the neuter/spay, it's easy to make it sound easy and cheap. I spent over $2,000 last year on ten cats. There are no low cost spay/neuter programs in this area.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishmailbox View Post

Actually, I'd rather not feed strays... most of the "strays" around here are feral and they hunt for themselves, which can be healthier for them and beneficial for us.



How is it healthier for the cats and beneficial for us?
post #6 of 16
Where do you live? Ohio animal protective league alters for about $15.00. I'd be so enraged if there wasn't inexpensive alters.

We have several trap alter release programs where people feed and watch out for ferals. Now most communties are outlawing more than three cats, which will only create more colonies.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post

Where do you live? Ohio animal protective league alters for about $15.00. I'd be so enraged if there wasn't inexpensive alters.

We have several trap alter release programs where people feed and watch out for ferals. Now most communties are outlawing more than three cats, which will only create more colonies.



I live in rural central Illinois. The nearest low cost spay/neuter program I've found is about two hours away, and I really don't want to stress already terrified cats with a car ride of that length. I may ultimately have no choice, though.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlp View Post

If you're not the one doing the trapping and paying for the neuter/spay, it's easy to make it sound easy and cheap. I spent over $2,000 last year on ten cats. There are no low cost spay/neuter programs in this area.







How is it healthier for the cats and beneficial for us?



Actually, my parents trapped, neutered, and released the male members of a stray cat colony in our old neighborhood. It was so easy, my mom accidentally trapped the neighbor's outdoor cat and took him to get neutered.



Beneficial for the cats who don't have to gulp down their carb-loaded kibble and beneficial for us who don't have to deal with mice and rats.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishmailbox View Post

Actually, my parents trapped, neutered, and released the male members of a stray cat colony in our old neighborhood. It was so easy, my mom accidentally trapped the neighbor's outdoor cat and took him to get neutered.



Beneficial for the cats who don't have to gulp down their carb-loaded kibble and beneficial for us who don't have to deal with mice and rats.



Just spent $200 last week, getting a male cat neutered. You're fortunate if you have access to a low cost program - that's not the case everywhere. My sister and I have spent many sleepless nights checking traps - in many areas, it's simply not safe to leave a cat (or other animal that happens to go in the trap) in the trap until morning. We end up trapping a lot more oppossums and raccoons than cats.



Even if you see it as a positive that mice and rats are killed, feral cats kill and eat a lot of birds also.



I live in the country, with a lot of small prey available to cats, and yet most of the ferals I encounter are on the verge of starvation. They have little resistance to disease because of it.



May I ask why your parents only neutered the males? Neutering the males is beneficial because it cuts down on fighting and disease transmission, but the only way to control the population is to spay the femalse. One passing tom could easily impregnate all the females in the colony.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlp View Post

Just spent $200 last week, getting a male cat neutered. You're fortunate if you have access to a low cost program - that's not the case everywhere. My sister and I have spent many sleepless nights checking traps - in many areas, it's simply not safe to leave a cat (or other animal that happens to go in the trap) in the trap until morning. We end up trapping a lot more oppossums and raccoons than cats.



Even if you see it as a positive that mice and rats are killed, feral cats kill and eat a lot of birds also.



I live in the country, with a lot of small prey available to cats, and yet most of the ferals I encounter are on the verge of starvation. They have little resistance to disease because of it.



May I ask why your parents only neutered the males? Neutering the males is beneficial because it cuts down on fighting and disease transmission, but the only way to control the population is to spay the femalse. One passing tom could easily impregnate all the females in the colony.



I understand there aren't low-cost clinics everywhere, but they're fairly common in my area.



We have quite a few feral cats around here, and as a result, we haven't had a problem with mice and rats in a while. There's no shortage of birds, though. Most of the ferals I find are not on the verge of starvation- in fact, we just spotted a hunting tom in our backyard a week or so ago. A little unkept looking, yes, but not starving by any means.



I don't support abandoning cats, obviously. My house cats wouldn't make it in the wild. But if there are a few ferals around to help keep the rodent population down in an urban area with few other predators, I'm good with that.



They did spay females, but rarely, because it tends to be more expensive. Neutering the males cuts down a population, regardless of the chance of a roving tom- the cat colony living in our old neighborhood was drastically downsized thanks to neutering the males. It's better to do something than nothing at all, and when altering males is half the price of altering females, that's a chance you have to take.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishmailbox View Post

They did spay females, but rarely, because it tends to be more expensive. Neutering the males cuts down a population, regardless of the chance of a roving tom- the cat colony living in our old neighborhood was drastically downsized thanks to neutering the males. It's better to do something than nothing at all, and when altering males is half the price of altering females, that's a chance you have to take.



First, let me say that I think it's terrific that your parents neutered males. Most people do nothing; your parents did something. I figured they didn't get the females spayed because of the cost, but I asked the question as a follow up to your original post, to show that spay/neuter isn't as incredibly easy as you described, for the people actually doing the work.



Cats account for about 100 million bird deaths in the U.S. every year, BTW.



As to your other original contention, that it is healthier for feral cats to not be fed by humans - most of the cats I have known well have started out as ferals or long term abandoned "street" cats, many were not far from death when I met them, all were undernourished, and even a few weeks with a full stomach made a world of difference.
post #12 of 16
That's true. The feral cat we discovered last year was living in an area where there were mice and birds galore, but she was nothing but bones and fur. The group we feed at the local park in our area have to compete with raccoons and other critters. Not an easy life, and catching prey is not always that easy either for these poor things.
post #13 of 16
The last time I fed a stray cat, it moved in.



I leave them to their selves now...
post #14 of 16
Quote:
First, let me say that I think it's terrific that your parents neutered males. Most people do nothing; your parents did something. I figured they didn't get the females spayed because of the cost, but I asked the question as a follow up to your originalpost, to show that spay/neuter isn't as incredibly easy as you described, for the people actually doing the work.



Hey, I was speaking from experience- for us, the trapping was relatively stress-free. Though, we lived in an urban environment with few other things around than cats, and had a lot of free time to watch the traps. I can see how trapping would be a pain, especially if you live in a rural area.



I will admit that there's a wild cat colony nearby (isolated in the middle of busy roads- the cats don't usually wander far from their wooded "island" because of the highways) that this group of people from my church take care of, and they are so healthy-looking it's slightly bizarre. But these people took it to another level... they built a whole village for the cats and now the colony is giant, and I suspect they're inbreeding because the group refuse to spay/neuter. It's really not a happy situation anymore. Everyone seems to dump their unwanted cats there so Kitty can run free and wild and live it up in the condos built especially for them in the forest. Plus, the people who care for them leave wet food out in the sun for days on end, and it gets horrible and smelly in there. I'm going to talk to my pastor about it- the colony is on church property. Everyone knows about it but does nothing. I'll volunteer time over the summer if it would help the cat problem.



I object to feeding strays most of the time because of what these people have done- they've created a giant problem that keeps getting worse every time they go out there and dump food all over the place. Rather than helping the cats, they're just making things worse.
post #15 of 16
I agree that, without spaying and neutering, the problem is just perpetuated. If your pastor has influence with these people, maybe you can get them hooked up with one of your local spay/neuter programs.
post #16 of 16
I definately feed the strays that show up here. We live in a very rural area in Indiana. We have barns and people dump cats here on occasion. Soemtimes, (as horrible as it is to say) these cats are declawed. I'm not a fan of it as I work at a Vet Clinic and see how it is performed...but that aside, it's not fair to dump a declawed cat out in the wild and expect them to fend for themselves. They can't climb trees to avoid coyotes, they can't catch food...they just can't survive. I will however get them spayed/neutered and if they're friendly, I bring them to work to find them homes. But in the mean time, for the cats that are more feral, I feel that feeding them is the least I can do. Also, I'm a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, I release my rehabs at my home so I have to feed them anyways. Carrie
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