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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-26-2017 11:07 AM
poivron Good point. I suppose meat-eaters may not be getting enough vitamin D either, since most of the animals they eat probably never saw the sun in their short, miserable lives.
07-26-2017 09:58 AM
silva @poivron , I agree!
It does present the opportunity to bring up all the fortification of dairy products, as well as the feed given to animals raised for food. There are studies showing a large increase in meateaters being deficient in B12 due to the meat from CAFA animals. If an animal isn't fed B12 their flesh won't have B12. Feed lots are supplemented--so in reality, if you eat meat you're supplementing B12- and it doesn't matter if it's indirectly or directly. Milk is fortified with D as well as other vitamins

Meat eaters can argue that's not true if animals are pastuer raised--but that's mostly rhetoric as the market for pasture raised animals is very small and largley fradulent. It's just saying vegans would get B12 if they are unwashed produce naturally fertilized
07-26-2017 09:34 AM
poivron Silva, I saw one of Dr. Michael Greger's videos about nutrition last Friday and realized that I have probably not been getting enough vitamin B12. A long time ago, I looked into the nutritional needs of vegans, and I somehow came away with the impression that the occasional teaspoonful of nutritional yeast, on top of daily fortified soymilk, would keep me out of trouble. But it seems that to get the full health benefits of a vegan diet, it's best to take vegan vitamin D and B-12 supplements, as well as some EPA/DHA from algae, although the need for the latter is not as clear-cut as the former.

As for supplementing, I'm afraid that saying that vegans need to supplement by swallowing vitamin pills gives meat-eaters the impression that veganism is unnatural and unhealthy. The only reason we need to supplement is that we don't drink from muddy streams any more; we don't spend as much time outdoors as we used to; and we eat too much processed food, so that our omega-6-to-omega-3 ratios get out of whack.

According to Dr. Greger, cyanocobalamin is fine, unless one is a smoker, has kidney failure, or eats a lot of cassava root:
https://nutritionfacts.org/questions...f-b12-is-best/

The following recommendations are very helpful:
https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/1...commendations/
and I've found that I can get all the vegan vitamins he recommends at the Vegan Essentials online store.
07-25-2017 09:03 AM
silva
Quote:
Originally Posted by poivron View Post
It's very important that you don't starve in an effort to be vegan. Otherwise, you'll only last a few weeks as a vegan. There is a very good book of recipes called "Vegan Cooking for One" by Leah Leneman. It presents recipes for every day of the week for eighteen weeks (usually one recipe a day, but you can always repeat a recipe). It'll give you lots of ideas.

I really like Silk "original" soymilk on cereal and in coffee. Try it; I find it tastier than almond milk, which, by the way, is really hard on the environment. (Almonds are grown in California, where there are serious long-term water shortage problems. It takes 1.1 gallons of water to grow one almond.) And if you like butter, definitely try Earth Balance vegan buttery sticks.

The two things you need to pay special attention to on a vegan diet are vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids. I get B12 from nutritional yeast, which I pour on popcorn that I pop myself in olive oil. (You don't have to do this every day; you only need to do it occasionally. Check the box to make sure it has vitamin B12; not all nutritional yeasts have it.) As for omega-3 fatty acids, either pour two teaspoonfuls of ground flax seed on your oatmeal every morning, or swallow a teaspoonful of flax seed oil each day, washing it down with orange juice.

That's all I have for now. Congratulations on making such a compassionate choice at such a young age, and good luck!
I need to refer to your comment on B12. If taken daily, small amounts, the further apart you supplement the amounts needed are FAR greater.
This is taken from : http://veganhealth.org/articles/everyvegan -
Quote:
To get the full benefit of a vegan diet, vegans should do one of the following:
  1. Eat fortified foods two or three times a day to get at least three micrograms (mcg or µg) of B12 a day or
  2. Take one B12 supplement daily providing at least 10 micrograms or
  3. Take a weekly B12 supplement providing at least 2000 micrograms.
If relying on fortified foods, check the labels carefully to make sure you are getting enough B12. For example, if a fortified plant milk contains 1 microgram of B12 per serving then consuming three servings a day will provide adequate vitamin B12. Others may find the use of B12 supplements more convenient and economical.
The less frequently you obtain B12 the more B12 you need to take, as B12 is best absorbed in small amounts. The recommendations above take full account of this. There is no harm in exceeding the recommended amounts or combining more than one option.
There are also differences between how much cynocobalamin vs methylcobalamin

And remember- in a plant based diet we are always supplementing B12, whether from fortified foods or tablets!
07-20-2017 04:19 PM
Emma JC hi Kaieli

Welcome and congrats on making a wonderful decision and kudos to your family for being supportive.

There are good sprouted breads like Ezekiel breads that you could make some all natural peanut butter and jam sandwiches to take or some sandwiches made from sliced tomatoes, sliced cucumber and avocado and the like.

There are some vegan pretzels and cereals like Spoon Size Shredded Wheat.

If you are cooking you could make a simple vegan chili and freeze some and take it and a sweet potato with you and some frozen veggies. I am not a fan of microwaves however it is the simplest way to cook a sweet potato quickly and they are delicious on their own or drizzled with some tahini or any other dressing like tahini with some jam or maple syrup and lemon juice or vinegar or some salsa.

You could precook some pasta with simple spaghetti sauce and add some broccoli or spinach and take it with you.

Bananas are great with some frozen berries (I keep lots of these around and put some in the fridge to thaw overnight) and you can sprinkle with flax meal and cocoa powder. A container of those to go would be tasty.

I have a recipe for Pancake Bars that can be made ahead of time and taken with you to go, there are lots of decent vegan pancake mixes or you could make your own.

Breakfast beans are also a good easily transportable item - baked beans in tomato sauce go nicely on toast. Try to find the lower sodium ones if you can but any of them that don't have pork are usually vegan.

Oh yes, one more thing we always keep on hand are cans of refried beans - we try to buy the lower sodium, oil free ones. Eden has a good one. Great with salsa and green onions, olives, peppers and any other veggie you wish to put in.

I hope this helps a bit. Congrats again!

Emma JC
07-20-2017 01:37 PM
poivron It's very important that you don't starve in an effort to be vegan. Otherwise, you'll only last a few weeks as a vegan. There is a very good book of recipes called "Vegan Cooking for One" by Leah Leneman. It presents recipes for every day of the week for eighteen weeks (usually one recipe a day, but you can always repeat a recipe). It'll give you lots of ideas.

I really like Silk "original" soymilk on cereal and in coffee. Try it; I find it tastier than almond milk, which, by the way, is really hard on the environment. (Almonds are grown in California, where there are serious long-term water shortage problems. It takes 1.1 gallons of water to grow one almond.) And if you like butter, definitely try Earth Balance vegan buttery sticks.

The two things you need to pay special attention to on a vegan diet are vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids. I get B12 from nutritional yeast, which I pour on popcorn that I pop myself in olive oil. (You don't have to do this every day; you only need to do it occasionally. Check the box to make sure it has vitamin B12; not all nutritional yeasts have it.) As for omega-3 fatty acids, either pour two teaspoonfuls of ground flax seed on your oatmeal every morning, or swallow a teaspoonful of flax seed oil each day, washing it down with orange juice.

That's all I have for now. Congratulations on making such a compassionate choice at such a young age, and good luck!
07-20-2017 01:12 PM
jessandreia I think you are already doing decently with vegan shopping. I'd recommend other types of green vegetables like broccoli, green beans, spinach, etc. Also, other types of legumes like lentils and chickpeas. Maybe some mushrooms and tofu.
07-20-2017 01:04 PM
Kaieli
Transitioner here

Hi! I'm 15 from Minnesota, and as of today I've been vegan for nine days. Cutting off animal products was easy simply because I don't want nor desire to eat them anymore. The first couple of days I wasn't eating much, I hadn't told my family I was vegan yet so they didn't know, I was only eating apples and peanut butter toast. Day 5 is when I told my mom, she's been pretty supportive, she's told me it's going to be hard, and she'll do her best but I'll have to cook most of my own meals from now, which is fine. I did a lot of research and watched a lot of documentaries before going vegan and I'm happy with my descion after what I've seen and learned.

I don't really know how to vegan grocery shop, so it's been a little hard. I bought some fruit (bananas, grapes, strawberries), romane lettuce, whole wheat grain spaghetti, tomato sauce, whole wheat bread, peanut butter, a can of black beans, white rice, some unfrosted poptarts, unsweetened vanilla almond milk, case of water, pretzels, olive oil, coconut oil, and strawberry cheerios (which I learned today aren't vegan sadly, but I only ate one bowl thank god.) I feel like I did okay shopping but I want to do better and have more variety.

Yesterday I spent the night at my sisters house and she had very little vegan friendly food, since me becoming vegan was very sudden she hadn't had time to purchase food for me to eat while over there, and the grocery store isn't close to where she lives, so I ate vegan junk food from the gas station the whole day I was there, I knew I had to eat but I want to be a healthy vegan so next time I'm going to bring my own food when I go over places.
Any suggestions on what healthy foods/snacks to bring or make at sleep overs?

I'd really like some tips on how to vegan grocery shop, and some recipes would be nice. This transition has been a little bumpy but I only plan to do better.

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