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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-17-2017 04:12 AM
BlueMts The closest thing we had to a vegetarian restaurant we had when I was young was a macrobiotic restaurant.

Stopped going there because the owner kept hitting on the girls.

Still love barely though. Not crazy about brown rice so I use barely instead.

Tomatoes were thought to be poisonous in Britain too in the 15 hundreds so were grown there only as ornamental plants.
05-12-2017 09:06 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa View Post
Thank you @David3 I'll take a look at those resources.

I did some reading and balanced macrobiotic diets are deemed in line with standard health guidelines, but I can see how the "fringe element" that is also seen among some raw vegans would endanger their own health or the health of others by refusing to take supplements because they're "unnatural."

The nightshade issue appears to reflect the time that the diet was developed, as nightshade fruits and vegetables were looked upon with great suspicion in the 1700-1800s, because of their relationship to deadly nightshade and belladonna herbs, and some superstitious people in the United States even thought tomatoes were a poisonous plant. The risks associated with green or blighted potatoes may also be related, but shouldn't be a problem with people who know not to eat green potatoes. There is also anecdotal evidence supporting the idea that people who have autoimmune illnesses are triggered by nightshades, however I don't see how that would apply to most people, it would be sort of like having a real gluten sensitivity or an allergy.

I think macrobiotic principles are probably good when taken more generally and less specifically.
The macrobiotic emphasis on whole grains and vegetables is really admirable. Every mainstream health organization recommends these foods.

I am half in love with the word "macrobiotic". When I go to an Asian restaurant that isn't vegetarian, they are always happy to make me a delicious rice-and-green-vegetable dish. My favorite!

Yep, definitely, the macrobiotic recommendation against eating nightshade fruits and vegetables is strange; it can drive people away from some very healthy foods.

Some macrobiotic websites also advise people to eat only certain beans, and to eat beans only once per day - no mainstream vegan organization recommends such an approach: http://www.macrobiotics.co.uk/foodlist.htm#beans

The above-linked macrobiotics website also advises people to avoid asparagus, beets, sweet potatoes, spinach, citrus fruit, and other healthy foods: http://www.macrobiotics.co.uk/foodli...aringlyoravoid . No mainstream health organization supports such claims.

Finally, that particular website recommends that people only occasionally eat raw foods: http://www.macrobiotics.co.uk/foodlist.htm#cooking . This just sounds crazy - what's wrong with eating a nice salad every day?


I definitely agree that macrobiotic diets can be balanced, but all the macrobiotic talk about yin, yang, attraction, repulsion etc. is not sufficient for the planning of nutritionally-complete eating. All the food-avoidance is crazy, as well.
05-12-2017 08:10 PM
Thalassa Thank you @David3 I'll take a look at those resources.

I did some reading and balanced macrobiotic diets are deemed in line with standard health guidelines, but I can see how the "fringe element" that is also seen among some raw vegans would endanger their own health or the health of others by refusing to take supplements because they're "unnatural."

The nightshade issue appears to reflect the time that the diet was developed, as nightshade fruits and vegetables were looked upon with great suspicion in the 1700-1800s, because of their relationship to deadly nightshade and belladonna herbs, and some superstitious people in the United States even thought tomatoes were a poisonous plant. The risks associated with green or blighted potatoes may also be related, but shouldn't be a problem with people who know not to eat green potatoes. There is also anecdotal evidence supporting the idea that people who have autoimmune illnesses are triggered by nightshades, however I don't see how that would apply to most people, it would be sort of like having a real gluten sensitivity or an allergy.

I think macrobiotic principles are probably good when taken more generally and less specifically.
05-12-2017 06:39 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa View Post
I find it strange I don't see much mention of this 200+ year old cross-culture dietary framework on plant based diet channels, since it's much more flexible and less restrictive than RT4 and other modern vegan nightmares. In fact, I've noticed that many mainstream vegans loosely follow some macrobiotic principles, like eating whole foods, locally sourced seasonal fruits and vegetables, and eating fermented probiotic foods for health. Sea vegetables can be a great source of iron and calcium, and stocking up on whole grains, avoiding alcohol and colas, and resistance of refined sugars seems pretty much like common sense to me. The only thing that's kind of odd about it is the avoidance of nightshade vegetables like eggplant and beets, something I don't understand unless a person had an allergy.

Thoughts?

Reed Mangels (vegan Registered Dietitian and nutrition consultant for the Vegetarian Resource Group) and Virginia Messina (vegan Registered Dietitian and principal author of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Position Paper on Vegetarian Diets) have written an academic text on the topic of vegetarian nutrition titled The Dietitians Guide to Vegetarian Diets: https://www.amazon.com/Dietitians-Gu...getarian+diets.

Here is an excerpt of the book, discussing macrobiotic diets for infants:https://books.google.com/books?id=He...biotic&f=false


Veganhealth.org, authored by vegan Registered Dietitian Jack Norris, has published this article about infants, children, and adults consuming macrobiotic diets: http://veganhealth.org/b12/mac


According to these authors, the main shortcomings of (some) macrobiotic diets are (1) unwillingness to include supplemental B12, D, and calcium, and (2) too-low fat / insufficient calories.
.
05-12-2017 06:24 PM
Thalassa
Macrobiotics

I find it strange I don't see much mention of this 200+ year old cross-culture dietary framework on plant based diet channels, since it's much more flexible and less restrictive than RT4 and other modern vegan nightmares. In fact, I've noticed that many mainstream vegans loosely follow some macrobiotic principles, like eating whole foods, locally sourced seasonal fruits and vegetables, and eating fermented probiotic foods for health. Sea vegetables can be a great source of iron and calcium, and stocking up on whole grains, avoiding alcohol and colas, and resistance of refined sugars seems pretty much like common sense to me. The only thing that's kind of odd about it is the avoidance of nightshade vegetables like eggplant and beets, something I don't understand unless a person had an allergy.

Thoughts?

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