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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-05-2017 04:21 PM
mars haven
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knowtions In Motion View Post
I eat a lot of chickpeas, but was under the impression that rinsing them was a good idea to rid of the extra sodium and such.

I can't seem to get past that thought in my brain to let me think that it's okay to save the liquid, call it aquafaba, and make stuff from it.

Then I begin to wonder if the liquid from cooking them yourself with just a little water would function in the same way as what you drain from the can.

Things that make me go hmmmmm........

Any active aquafaba users in the house who can help sort my brain with this?
You can also use white beans instead. Some people find the chick peas may have a strong flavor.
07-31-2017 11:32 PM
Spudulika
Quote:
Originally Posted by Symondezyn View Post
I have made and used aquafaba a LOT!! ... you need to use a specific ratio of peas to water, and add some kombu for thickening, then just cook them in a slow cooker for 8-9 hrs.
What ratio of beans to water?
07-31-2017 06:15 PM
mars haven I heard that white beans can be used instead to avoid the beany smell. Try that maybe next time.
03-10-2017 01:53 AM
silva I think I even have a container in my freezer, from a couple months ago! I wasn't sure if it would still have the properties.
This weekend I'm doing it! the french toast, the merinques!
03-09-2017 07:50 PM
Mojo
Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
Those are so pretty! Were they hard and crisp, or moist, in the middle?
Crisp. But I left them on the counter overnight and the next morning they were sticky and a little soft. The instructions said to put them in an airtight container, and I didn't do that. I put them back in the oven for a bit to zap the moisture out of them, and they were fine.
03-09-2017 05:22 PM
Symondezyn
Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
Those are so pretty! Were they hard and crisp, or moist, in the middle?

I cook chickpeas so often, and every time I fill a jar-then let it spoil.
You can freeze your aquafaba, either in a container, or in ice cube trays... works like a charm! ^_^
03-09-2017 02:36 PM
silva Those are so pretty! Were they hard and crisp, or moist, in the middle?

I cook chickpeas so often, and every time I fill a jar-then let it spoil.
03-09-2017 10:45 AM
Mojo I made the meringue cookies from the Aquafaba cookbook! I used the canned bean water rather than homemade, and the cookies did have a little bit of a bean smell, but that's okay with me.
02-23-2017 10:28 AM
Symondezyn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post
Zsu Dever just wrote a vegan cookbook called Aquafaba. I am going to try to make the meringue cookies from it this weekend and will try to post a photo here. I'm completely fascinated by the idea of making stuff from bean water.

Here is a Pinterest board with a few pictures from the book. There are a lot more photos in the book, but this is all I could find online.
https://www.pinterest.com/VeganCookb...quafaba-vegan/
That's an excellent book - loads of great ideas, and it's her recipe for French Toast I actually use all the time! SO yummy! ^_^
02-22-2017 01:41 PM
Mojo Zsu Dever just wrote a vegan cookbook called Aquafaba. I am going to try to make the meringue cookies from it this weekend and will try to post a photo here. I'm completely fascinated by the idea of making stuff from bean water.

Here is a Pinterest board with a few pictures from the book. There are a lot more photos in the book, but this is all I could find online.
https://www.pinterest.com/VeganCookb...quafaba-vegan/
02-22-2017 08:09 AM
Knowtions In Motion
Quote:
Originally Posted by Symondezyn View Post
I have made and used aquafaba a LOT!! You can use the liquid in canned chickpeas, but if I'm going to do that, I buy organic ones with cans that are EPA free. Homemade is far better though; you need to use a specific ratio of peas to water, and add some kombu for thickening, then just cook them in a slow cooker for 8-9 hrs. The resulting cooked peas are delicious; so much more tender and flavourful than canned.

You can use aquafaba for all kinds of AMAZING things; one of my favourite uses is as an egg replacer in French Toast - MMMMM!! ^_^

You can even whip it like egg whites to make all kinds of baked goods and even meringue. I sometimes use it as an egg replacer for making delicate things like cupcakes - flax works too but aquafaba makes things so much more tender ^_^
Thank you kindly!! Looking forward to trying it out in my ongoing food prep adventures.
02-21-2017 03:30 PM
Symondezyn I have made and used aquafaba a LOT!! You can use the liquid in canned chickpeas, but if I'm going to do that, I buy organic ones with cans that are EPA free. Homemade is far better though; you need to use a specific ratio of peas to water, and add some kombu for thickening, then just cook them in a slow cooker for 8-9 hrs. The resulting cooked peas are delicious; so much more tender and flavourful than canned.

You can use aquafaba for all kinds of AMAZING things; one of my favourite uses is as an egg replacer in French Toast - MMMMM!! ^_^

You can even whip it like egg whites to make all kinds of baked goods and even meringue. I sometimes use it as an egg replacer for making delicate things like cupcakes - flax works too but aquafaba makes things so much more tender ^_^
02-19-2017 10:52 AM
Knowtions In Motion
Aquafaba Curiosity

I eat a lot of chickpeas, but was under the impression that rinsing them was a good idea to rid of the extra sodium and such.

I can't seem to get past that thought in my brain to let me think that it's okay to save the liquid, call it aquafaba, and make stuff from it.

Then I begin to wonder if the liquid from cooking them yourself with just a little water would function in the same way as what you drain from the can.

Things that make me go hmmmmm........

Any active aquafaba users in the house who can help sort my brain with this?

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