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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-16-2016 11:46 AM
Symondezyn I would say other than food-related things, not being prepared for the emotional impact it will have. I had no idea how much emotional turmoil being vegan would cause me at times, particularly since I was SO pumped at the beginning. After the initial rosy glow died down a bit, the weight of feeling very very alone in my lifestyle choice, and just wanting to feel "normal" once in awhile, juxtaposed with facing the prevalence of animal exploitation everywhere, has caused me some truly painful emotional moments. I think it's EXTREMELY important to have at least one person in your life who is 100% supportive of you. My husband is still omni (for now) but he has been my biggest supporter, and has really gotten me through some tough days - not to mention, it's extremely encouraging to see HIM making changes in his own life as a result of the changes I've made in mine. <3
08-12-2016 10:02 PM
cherries Not doing enough research about nutrition to make sure they get all they need.
05-17-2016 04:28 AM
ellaj
Quote:
Originally Posted by dormouse View Post
Eating too little. Vegan food is less calorie-dense than animal-based food, so you may need to up your volume of food. Have snacks ready, even if you're not typically a snacker. People new to veganism often complain of feeling low energy or tired--often it's because they are not eaten enough. I highly recommend also making sure that you're eating plenty of fats. This was the main thing I missed when I transitioned from vegetarianism to veganism, but avocadoes, olives, and other plant-based fats helped me adjust.
This ^ is so true. I have had to up my calories and add in plenty of plant-based fats. My energy level has increased two fold and I no longer feel hungry all of the time. I snack on a regular basis now and nuts are my go to when I am on the run, I carry them with me in my purse.
05-16-2016 08:12 PM
Aliakai -Not doing sufficient research on nutrition
-Doing it -just- for weight loss and giving up when it doesn't happen immediately
-Expecting weight loss automatically with no effort on their part
-Trying to discuss veg/vegan issues with friends and family without sufficient research to back up their feelings and claims
-Simply removing meats from their plates without adding back in things like beans/faux meats/tofu/tempeh/seitan to replace the lost nutrients.
-Not experimenting with substitutes before jumping in, then eating a ton of processed food to compensate
-Relying too much on prepackaged and processed veg/an food, then complaining about the impact on their wallets
05-16-2016 07:45 PM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa4 View Post
Why are you copying parts of other people's posts?
Probably getting post count up for permissions to post a link to sell something or a blog.

Up to ten posts, let's see if I'm just a crabby old lady.
05-16-2016 07:20 PM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaby Lu View Post
I would say overall lack of research and/or support. ..this leads to poor eating habits (like trying to live off of pasta and not eating enough veggies, nuts or seeds, or not swapping out different foods for particular nutrients for vegans. ..or overeating cheese for lacto-ovo or lacto vegetarians).
Why are you copying parts of other people's posts?
05-16-2016 07:17 PM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by joehall View Post
I have come across many new veggies that refuse to eat legumes, nuts, or seeds....even actual vegetables in a couple cases. Highly processed fake meats and soy don't cut it and should not be eaten as your only source of protein. Legumes and such do have high amounts of protein and can keep you feeling full and powered.
Soy isn't highly processed. Chinese people have been eating it for 2,000 years, and I get really tired of all the BS going around about soy and gluten. Soy is a great source of protein and iron for vegans, especially so for people who need to learn to work beans and legumes into their diet, or who have trouble digesting legumes in whole form.

Also, some faux meats are organic, they are not even half as bad as you're trying to make them out to be, especially if they are consumed in moderation in a balanced vegan diet, they can actually be a great source of caloric density, comfort, and are even fortified in some cases.
05-15-2016 11:52 PM
Gaby Lu I would say overall lack of research and/or support. ..this leads to poor eating habits (like trying to live off of pasta and not eating enough veggies, nuts or seeds, or not swapping out different foods for particular nutrients for vegans. ..or overeating cheese for lacto-ovo or lacto vegetarians).
03-26-2016 08:29 AM
Pirate Huntress Thinking they have to give up all forms of non healthy food in order to be vegan
healthy eating and veganism are two separate issues.
03-26-2016 05:32 AM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by joehall View Post
I have come across many new veggies that refuse to eat legumes, nuts, or seeds....even actual vegetables in a couple cases. Highly processed fake meats and soy don't cut it and should not be eaten as your only source of protein. Legumes and such do have high amounts of protein and can keep you feeling full and powered.
Legumes are very important in my diet. I cook for three, the other two male, and they are always adding extra beans, too. Everything is apparently better with black beans added, according to my adult son lol.
03-26-2016 04:56 AM
joehall
Legumes and such do have high amounts of protein.

I have come across many new veggies that refuse to eat legumes, nuts, or seeds....even actual vegetables in a couple cases. Highly processed fake meats and soy don't cut it and should not be eaten as your only source of protein. Legumes and such do have high amounts of protein and can keep you feeling full and powered.
03-22-2016 02:01 AM
devonfoodie
Quote:
Originally Posted by joehall View Post
The big ones I see are an over dependence on "subs" as in Boca or other meat-like products. Simply put these products are ****, they are junk food. Like all junk food its fine to have them now and then...but if you are doing it multiple times a week you are doing something wrong.
We are avoiding the cruelty of meat. Don't mind if meat-like or meat-tasting products can be obtained without actually hurting animals, in which case fake meat makes perfect sense to them.
03-22-2016 12:29 AM
Spudulika
Quote:
Originally Posted by joehall View Post
The big ones I see are an over dependence on "subs" as in Boca or other meat-like products. Simply put these products are ****, they are junk food. Like all junk food its fine to have them now and then...but if you are doing it multiple times a week you are doing something wrong.
There's nothing "wrong" in eating meat subs IMO, they're usually better for health than the meat they replace, simply because they're made of plant protein sources like soya and wheat. They have no cholesterol and usually are lower in fat and especially saturated fat. I used to eat them regularly and enjoyed them with no ill effects. They are easy to source and to cook and make meal planning no trouble. I don't have them so much these days because I enjoy whole foods more.
03-21-2016 11:21 PM
jessandreia
Quote:
Originally Posted by joehall View Post
The big ones I see are an over dependence on "subs" as in Boca or other meat-like products. Simply put these products are ****, they are junk food. Like all junk food its fine to have them now and then...but if you are doing it multiple times a week you are doing something wrong.
This judgement within vegans needs to stop.
If eating faux meats on a more regular basis helps some people stay vegan/vegetarian, great. The animals thank them.
03-21-2016 10:13 PM
joehall The big ones I see are an over dependence on "subs" as in Boca or other meat-like products. Simply put these products are ****, they are junk food. Like all junk food its fine to have them now and then...but if you are doing it multiple times a week you are doing something wrong.
03-19-2016 03:30 AM
devonfoodie
Quote:
Originally Posted by @rno View Post
Forgetting to take vitamin B12. This is the only important vitamin that is not in a vegan diet.
Right! You can also get B12 from fermented vegan food, such as sauerkraut, kimchi and even soy sauce. But it may not be easily absorbable too. So the easiest way is to simply take a B12 supplement, for vegans and non-vegans alike, if there is any suspicion of deficiency. The supplement is very cheap. And you need very little of it. We can also stores B12 in our bodies for decades.
03-19-2016 03:23 AM
SteveW Not eating enough.
03-19-2016 02:39 AM
Naturebound Not learning how to cook and experiment with plant based food. Cooking and preparing food every day opens up worlds for a person in terms of variety, textures, tastes, nutrition, personal satisfaction. Learn to make homemade breads, bean dips, sauces from cauliflower or sweet potato, garden salads with new plants you haven't tried. I discovered jicama as a vegan for example, and turnip greens. And nutritional yeast. And millet. And bulgur lentil sloppy joes. The possibilities of what you can make are nearly endless.

Lack of planning. You will need to prepare meals for work, and research or call restaurants ahead or be willing to speak to the waiter about your needs. When you travel it is important to know what is available where you are going. Sites like Happy Cow or Veg Dining are great for helping with this. You need to be able to plan to have snacks with you when you go to parties where food will be served because it may or may not be vegan. It may seem overwhelming at first but it becomes second nature after a while and no big deal. If you stick to your principles and remember always why you went vegan or vegetarian, it is easier.

People don't stay positive. They focus on the negatives, like what they can not have, or that most of the world still isn't vegan and how evil everyone is. Focus on the fact that you ARE making a huge difference in many areas as a veg*n, even if you are only one person. Remember that most people are disconnected with where their food and clothing and toiletries etc come from. Remember to live with compassion and focus on love and the power of your choices that you make every day. Embrace the plant kingdom. Share your vegan food with others, or volunteer to do some animal rights activism. Work in a soup kitchen, or visit a farm sanctuary. Watch a vegan documentary. Get involved in social groups such as local vegan or vegetarian Meetup group.
03-19-2016 02:16 AM
@rno Forgetting to take vitamin B12. This is the only important vitamin that is not in a vegan diet.
03-18-2016 08:00 PM
dormouse Eating too little. Vegan food is less calorie-dense than animal-based food, so you may need to up your volume of food. Have snacks ready, even if you're not typically a snacker. People new to veganism often complain of feeling low energy or tired--often it's because they are not eaten enough. I highly recommend also making sure that you're eating plenty of fats. This was the main thing I missed when I transitioned from vegetarianism to veganism, but avocadoes, olives, and other plant-based fats helped me adjust.
03-18-2016 05:50 PM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spudulika View Post
- Lack of prior preparation and research regarding suitable foods and recipes, thus leading to hunger and stress (and mess ups).
- Not recording food intake on a proper nutrition tool (useful for getting an idea of what's going into your body and what's going on as a consequence)
- Allowing for eating more: either bigger portion sizes (vegetarian staples are typically lower in calories) or more frequently, or both.
- Not eating enough carb heavy foods (carbs are our friends, our brains and muscles thrive on carbs/starch/sugars)
- Not eating enough vegetable fats in the form of oils, nuts, seeds and avocados (vegetable based foods are typically lower in fat than animal foods, and as a consequence can initially feel less satiating - leading to hunger pangs)
- Worrying waayyyy too much about the protein thing (all food has protein. No-one ever dies of "protein deficiency". You will be just fine so long as you swap out your meat for some legumes).
- Fretting about the details (You ate some marshmallows. You didn't realise they have gelatine in. Surprise, it's OK! There's no need to wail "I failed!", promptly abandon being vegetarian and stuff down a 1lb rare steak in solace.)

I agree with all of this except the protein thing. While American omnis certainly over-do protein, I think some vegans underplay the role of protein in feelings of fullness or satiation...it's not just fats but beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, soy and faux meats which lead to a more complete feeling of satisfaction, or ability to go for hours without getting hungry again. Combing foods for complete proteins (veg protein plus whole grain) also assures nutritional adequacy with amino acids.

Protein deficiency can occur, but usually in people who suffer from anorexia or very very poor countries. For example the GMO golden rice project has failed in nutritional adequacy for developing nations because a solid protein source actually is required so these people don't suffer malnutrition...because of lack of variety in their diet, they cannot survive on fortified rice alone.
03-18-2016 05:44 PM
Thalassa4 I would say overall lack of research and/or support. ..this leads to poor eating habits (like trying to live off of pasta and not eating enough veggies, nuts or seeds, or not swapping out different foods for particular nutrients for vegans. ..or overeating cheese for lacto-ovo or lacto vegetarians)...this also can lead to financial stress (imagining veganism is too expensive bc of over-reliance on things like frozen meals or vegan products, a mistake I personally made in my early 20s which led to my giving up back then)...or even not being properly informed to fend off critics (starting to think, oh maybe they're right, maybe I do need animal products. ..or else overemphasizing the ethical argument without any nutritional or historical defense of veg*n diets, which just increases misperception of veg*ns).

The other is the trends towards dangerous juice fasts or fruititarianism, coloring their entire view of vegan diets incorrectly.
03-18-2016 04:13 PM
BlackBoxed I notice a lot of younger/new vegans bend under pressure in social settings because they're not up front and don't stay firm, or they let others guilt them and put them down, in turn giving up and going back to omni diet.

(Really difficult to word that as a mistake! Try two!)

Basically, at social settings I was tried super hard by people who would say stuff like "But I made it for you" or "But there's only a little!" or "But it's just fish!" after saying no, I'd get teased pretty hard and several times I did nearly give in, but because I was so firm about what I wanted (and/or didn't want ) it's now entirely normal when I go out and everyone (for the most part) just leaves me be.

And to add on to other stuff.

- Not calling restaurants to see their vegan options is a big no-no. It's really depressing to sit at a table with a tiny, undressed bowl of salad greens as your dinner.

- Not checking and double checking the ingredients/items. More than once I've had to return a red pepper dip (mayo) that I've thought was red pepper hummus.

- Trying to be the perfect vegan. There is no such thing.
03-18-2016 03:40 PM
tfvc.org One of the main things is nutrition. People need to do research and realise the sources for where to get vitamins and minerals that they used to rely on eating mussels.
03-18-2016 03:27 PM
silva It seems that many really pigeonhole vegan diets without understanding that it's more about rethinking how to eat instead of just what not to eat
It isn't all quinoa salads, or noodles and veggies, and seitan, tofu and tempeh are foods, not faux meats!
Wanting foods that mimic those you're used to eating doesn't make you any less veg'n.
Vegan chese is much better when you stop trying to make it taste like dairy and learn the tricks of it's use
03-18-2016 12:15 PM
Spudulika - Lack of prior preparation and research regarding suitable foods and recipes, thus leading to hunger and stress (and mess ups).
- Not recording food intake on a proper nutrition tool (useful for getting an idea of what's going into your body and what's going on as a consequence)
- Allowing for eating more: either bigger portion sizes (vegetarian staples are typically lower in calories) or more frequently, or both.
- Not eating enough carb heavy foods (carbs are our friends, our brains and muscles thrive on carbs/starch/sugars)
- Not eating enough vegetable fats in the form of oils, nuts, seeds and avocados (vegetable based foods are typically lower in fat than animal foods, and as a consequence can initially feel less satiating - leading to hunger pangs)
- Worrying waayyyy too much about the protein thing (all food has protein. No-one ever dies of "protein deficiency". You will be just fine so long as you swap out your meat for some legumes).
- Fretting about the details (You ate some marshmallows. You didn't realise they have gelatine in. Surprise, it's OK! There's no need to wail "I failed!", promptly abandon being vegetarian and stuff down a 1lb rare steak in solace.)
03-18-2016 12:03 PM
SirStarchALot Thinking that they will be healthy and thin just because...

With that said, if you are doing it for health purposes (or not), I think the biggest mistake is eating processed foods...

Eat whole foods.

You can still be considered vegan by eating Oreo's and drinking Coke.
03-18-2016 11:47 AM
devonfoodie
What common mistakes people make when moving to vegetarian and vegan diet?

What common mistakes people make when moving to vegetarian and vegan diet?

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