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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-16-2016 01:35 PM
Symondezyn
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Rawrg, Fire!!!
LMAO ok yep - you caught me; I am a crazy cook - flame on!!
08-16-2016 12:29 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Symondezyn View Post
I used to have a non-stick wok, and it never got hot enough to be able to create that wonderful "wok hei" flavour, whereas my carbon steel gets smoking hot and does it with ease, even on an electric stove ^_^

Rawrg, Fire!!!




08-16-2016 11:29 AM
Symondezyn I have a carbon steel wok I bought from Amazon for around $35. It does require a certain amount of fussiness to initially season it, and keep it seasoned, but the effort you put in is WELL worth it!!! (if it rusts, a little coarse salt and oil rubbed into it will take care of that easily). I used to have a non-stick wok, and it never got hot enough to be able to create that wonderful "wok hei" flavour, whereas my carbon steel gets smoking hot and does it with ease, even on an electric stove ^_^
08-15-2016 10:13 AM
Lipps We use a huge 14" Lodge cast iron wok. Weighs 14 pounds. Round bottom inside, but flat bottom outside so you can use it on stovetop. One our favorite cooking tools.
You can buy them for around 45-50 dollars if you shop around.

08-14-2016 11:54 AM
silva
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
Oh thank you! That's a really good price and a nice pan! I may go by the mall tomorrow!
Pretty sure that sale ends today, 8-14

Mine is a Circulon. I just made a stir fry and it doesn't easlily carmelize onions or pineapple the way a stainless or carbon steel would. Still a really pan.
08-13-2016 09:39 PM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
I checked Macys and saw this one from Cuisinart on sale-
http://www1.macys.com/shop/product/c...D1%26kws%3Dwok
Oh thank you! That's a really good price and a nice pan! I may go by the mall tomorrow!
08-13-2016 06:27 PM
silva I checked Macys and saw this one from Cuisinart on sale-
http://www1.macys.com/shop/product/c...D1%26kws%3Dwok
08-13-2016 03:40 PM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
@LedBoots , when you get your new wok, send photos!

Woks are awesome - they kinda look like shiny UFO's.

.
I saw these two on amazon, very deep, and good for electric stove tops, from the reviews. On one the lid is a cool domed shape, and they sell a steamer rack for inside that I'm tempted to get.

The rice cooker and this wok are the first kitchen things I have bought in years, so I'm very excited.


VERSUS
08-13-2016 02:21 PM
David3 @LedBoots , when you get your new wok, send photos!

Woks are awesome - they kinda look like shiny UFO's.

.
08-13-2016 02:06 PM
silva I gave up on traditional high heat wok cooking. I used to have a cheap one and never got the timing right on all the veggies unless I julienned everything. Then I got a Circulon hard anodized, which I don't use much like a wok.

I now have taken to letting frozen peas and broccoli almost thaw while preparing other components. Start with the onions, mushrooms and peppers, and then tofu or tempeh. Let those stir around then add garlic and ginger paste, turn up heat, add broccoli. Now I make a sauce with cornstarch, add after squirting in some braggs. Hopefully I'll have canned pineapple and add with broccoli and juice in sauce
08-13-2016 12:26 PM
OnionBudgie I have a Typhoon carbon steel wok. It's good quality, and does the job. It's true that carbon steel woks need a certain amount of care to keep them in good condition -- in addition to the initial elbow-work to scrub off the thin protective coating so that it can be properly prepared with oil! Holy moly, they don't warn you about that. That stuff is stuck on good. Takes forever.

I had a non-stick wok before that. Personally, I wouldn't recommend non-stick for the high temperatures a wok is used at.

Woks are a lot of fun to use. I hope you find a good one!
08-13-2016 08:24 AM
LedBoots Excellent, @David3 , thank you so much for the information. I am excited about a big wok so I can keep some stuff warm on the sides, when it cooks faster than other parts. And etc.
08-13-2016 07:47 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
Do you use a wok? I have been thinking about getting one, as I stirfry a lot. Without being ridiculously expensive, any specific recommendations?

I don't want nonstick or aluminum, I think, and I'm cooking for myself, and two men who eat a ridiculous amount, so a good sized one. Sadly, have an electric stove so, sigh, no fire. (I'm in the US, probably will buy on Amazon lol)

Thanks! In this hot hot weather, plus having a new rice cooker [emoji7] , chop and stirfry everything has been the go-to for me this summer..

1. Stainless steel woks are good. Even though some chefs romanticize carbon steel woks, I wouldn't recommend it; they require care to prevent them from rusting. Here is a wok, from Amazon, which has an aluminum core (for good heat transfer) but a stainless steel cladding (to prevent aluminum-contamination of food): https://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-726...&keywords=woks

2. A big wok is better than a small wok. When you're stir-frying, you really need to sling that food around. If the wok is small, you'll end up slinging the food out of the wok.

3. Because you have an electric stove, you will need a flat-bottom wok. A truly round-bottom wok will not make good enough thermal contact with the electric burner.
.
08-13-2016 04:29 AM
LedBoots
Do you use a wok?

Do you use a wok? I have been thinking about getting one, as I stirfry a lot. Without being ridiculously expensive, any specific recommendations?

I don't want nonstick or aluminum, I think, and I'm cooking for myself, and two men who eat a ridiculous amount, so a good sized one. Sadly, have an electric stove so, sigh, no fire. (I'm in the US, probably will buy on Amazon lol)

Thanks! In this hot hot weather, plus having a new rice cooker [emoji7] , chop and stirfry everything has been the go-to for me this summer..

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