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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-18-2016 08:32 PM
dbrittany I grew up in a meat eating household, but my mom always made me eat the vegetables on my plate first. She also introduced me to all kinds of non-meat foods. I'm very grateful that she did, I have a taste for quite a few things now. Although, when I decided to become vegetarian a few years ago, she was very worried that I would not get enough nutrients and constantly tried to get me to eat meals that were heavy in dairy products. Now she doesn't worry so much, and even prefers some of my meatless meals over her meat dishes, usually something with TVP in it. She also prefers veggie burgers to regular burgers because she has better digestion.

Since there are people in my family who are either pork or beef free, there are a lot of vegetable dishes for me to eat during the holidays! My desserts are usually a hit because my family assumes them to be extremely healthy (even if they're full of sugar LOL). As the years go by, I've stopped getting strange diet related questions and see family around me trying out things like green smoothies or cutting back on dark meat. I know they're not likely to become vegetarians, but it's inspiring to watch them try to become healthier.
09-27-2016 03:27 PM
veggielover838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa4 View Post
In the beginning I used to complain about how I was coerced to "eat my meat" when it was served as a child, but after a long conversation with my extremely traditional sister, I realized I mostly ate oats for breakfast, and peanut butter or cheese toast, for breakfast when older. For lunch I frequently had peanut butter, cheese, or egg salad sandwiches. I was offered fresh fruit, vegetables and pickles for snacks. Dinner could include meat, or be pinto or butter beans. I had entire vegetarian days in my childhood, and other wise ate small portions of meat. My uncle encouraged me to eat cream of celery soup with Ms.Dash.

I was in no way raised in a vegetarian family. But we ate small portions of meat by today's standards. In fact often our meat was fish.

I have been lucky to have an immediate family open to vegetarian or vegan meals, or at least more humane farm practices.

Does anyone else here see support within their families, if they look closer?

No , if there were any rogue meat eaters here, we were not on welfare. We had brand name peanut butter, real blocks of cheese, and my grandparents grew nearly every vegetable and made their own grape jelly, they were proud Republicans, though my mother and sister are not. My family intentionally ate that way. We ate a lot of fruits, beans, cheese, etc.
Love this thread!

My journey started 14 yrs ago in middle school when I announced to my family that I was a going to be a vegetarian after watching an animal cruelty video. My mom knew nothing about vegetarian cooking but decided to always include vegetarian options for me each meal in conjunction with the fam's meal. I have to say that my family also graciously checked menu's before heading out to restaurants to see if there was something I could eat. They never belittled me for my beliefs or made a big fuss about it.

My journey to learning about healthy nutrition included my family. We would talk about nutrition at the dinner table and my mom and I started learning and sharing articles we read or recipes we came across. But a funny thing happened on this 14 year journey...the more we learned and shared with each other whether it was at the dinner table or in general conversation the more the rest of the family's eating preferences changed. Today my mom is a vegan. My brother is in the military and is limited but is always looking for healthier options when able. My dad, though still a card carrying meat eater, has really tried to up his game to include more salads and veggies.

Honestly, when I read other stories I realize how relatively easy I had it at home. I also think my home experience helped me try to talk and not lecture to others about my preferences. I believe having people accept your choices and changing others eating preferences whether for the animals, the planet, or for health is done in conversation and by example not lecture or judgement.
05-28-2016 05:03 AM
LedBoots My son as a 10 year old went vegetarian on Thanksgiving, with the whole family at my house for a holiday meal. Lol. He was just too grossed out. My husband just ate the side dishes with him and no turkey to be supportive.

So we all three ended up going vegetarian and then soon vegan. Daughter now living in her own place is still omni, pescatarian with no dairy, but happily makes and eats vegan food all the time because she learned to cook from me.

My parents were not very supportive, but just more confused than anything tbh. My sister and brother are supportive omnis, my brother in law is an ass and does stuff like put deer antlers in my car wheel to make me think I hit a deer with my car. [emoji33]

For the most part, no one bothers us about it anymore. It was of course harder at first, but they are used to our wacky ways now.
05-27-2016 01:22 PM
Tom My parents and two sisters have been OK with my vegetarianism, although they never adopted it themselves. I don't think any of them were shocked, because I've always really liked animals in general. I think my parents realized it wasn't some sort of rebellious acting-out or anything like that- it was a logical, natural expression of values they always knew I had. Besides, I got into it gradually, becoming first pescetarian and then vegetarian. And I often did my own cooking when I was living with them.

My parents are gone now, and I miss them.
05-27-2016 12:19 PM
Jinga I am lucky to have never really had issues with my family about this sort of thing.

- My mother is the type to always want to be able to provide for everyone and their special needs. As a kid, I remember her making sure there were vegan options for a friend of theirs when she came over.
- I introduced my parents to my now husband over a vegan Thanksgiving meal at my house.
- Then at Christmas, when I met my now husband's parents, I discovered his mother had made me my own vegetarian tamales when she was preparing their traditional holiday meal. She was even sensitive enough to make them with separate utensils.
- When I was working at my last office job, they were always very nice to order me veggie meals when we had office freebies. One person even went so far as to offer to bring me to get veggie burgers and other vegetarian food on the way to a business related cookout.
05-27-2016 12:07 AM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliakai View Post
My birth family was strictly Atkins, so most plant foods were heavily restricted growing up. We subsisted mostly on eggs, cheese, milk, low carb breads and snacks, lots and lots of meat, and vegetables often smothered in gravy or cheese sauce.

That said, my older sisters, when they found out I was vegan, cooked myself and my guys a vegan meal, checking with me repeatedly to make sure that none of the ingredients they were using violated my dietary practices. My mother in law frequently comes to the wine tastings that I host and compliments our food, stating that in her opinion anyone who thinks my hubby is deprived is stupid because he eats more gourmet food by her standards than he ever did growing up.
I'm so happy for you. That must be extremely difficult coming from a low carb background. I'm sincerely happy that your family supports your healthy plant based meals.
05-27-2016 12:04 AM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
My family have been mostly supportive of my veganism. At first they were worried, and rightfully so, because I was trying to recover from anorexia at the time I went vegan and was underweight. It took some time and patience for them to come around and see that my diet was not going to be so restrictive. I made a lot of vegan treats and hardy foods and shared them with family to show them how creative and fulfilling plant based eating can be. They were open to trying them because they know I am an excellent cook, and they were surprised at how awesome vegan food is. Over time my Mom and sister took more of an interest and eventually made attempts to go vegan themselves. My sister was strictly vegan for two years but eventually settled on vegetarian. She is on a very limited budget, struggles with severe mental illness, and relies on food shelves and other charitie
s often for her food, so she has had to be a little more flexible. I buy her groceries and make her stuff when I can. My Mom has a gluten intolerance and has bouts of severe diverticulitis which means she can not eat stuff like nuts, seeds (even in fruits like strawberries), corn kernals. She was strictly vegan for about six months and lost half her hair. But I think she was too restrictive with what she allowed herself to eat because she was trying to lose weight also (talk about the irony as they had been so worried about me). She went back to meat and dairy for a while, and has been back and forth with eating vegan. I spent hours with her at first, even made her a three ring binder FULL of gluten free vegan food ideas and recipes. I had her supplement with DHA since she can't have nuts/seeds. But she would go back to bingeing on fast food, dairy, meat (she struggles with binge eating disorder). All that said, they are still supportive of my veganism, and they love my dishes I bring to get togethers. We eat exclusively gluten free vegan at holidays together which is awesome of them to do for me.

My Dad is supportive of my veganism. He has even encouraged me when i was doing some animal rights activism for a while, leafleting and tabling and so on. He also loves my vegan dishes I make for him when I see him once per year (he lives very far away out of state). He has never questioned my veganism.

My partner whom I have been with for 18 years struggled with it at first. it took him over a year to come around. Now is is much more supportive. he goes weeks without eating meat, and is mostly vegetarian at home. Coming from dairy farmers and being a former deer hunter and whose family are all hunters, this is fairly impressive. For the most part he has been encouraging about my veganism, though we don't see eye to eye on all issues. He has been respectful as far as not using my dishes/silverware/cookware for animal based foods. We do keep separate cupboards for our foods and separate areas of the refrigerator for our own foods. He's even stopped eating eggs for a long time now, but can't give up his dairy. But overall he has been supportive. We've gone to animal rights causes together when they involve wild animals like wolves (we are both against legalizing wolf hunting). He has a harder time with farm animal issues though. Small steps. He actually helped me leaflet downtown once. I do suspect if we didn't live together or know each other he would never come to veganism or even vegetarianism on his own. I am certain he does it more for me than anything else, though his own doctors have told him to cut back on dairy due to him having high cholesterol and suffering with RA.

My partner's family have not been as supportive about my veganism, but they aren't horrible either, at least most of them. I bring all my own food to get togethers, and they like to try my dishes and enjoy them. But they are not quiet in their belief that farm animals are there for humans to use. We have very different beliefs in a lot of areas, but we don't argue about it. We just try to find common ground and keep the peace.

I've been fortunate to have very little nastiness as far as my veganism, though my partner made stupid jokes about it at first. After I threatened to leave him he stopped lol. I am the bread winner and very independent so I think that has helped me. I also have total control of the kitchen and I make all our dinners.
I always find the aspect of you overcoming eating disorders with veganism so inspiring. Reminds me of watching teen girls who swore they never felt compelled to diet or skip meals, because they were raised vegan. That's so powerful in our culture.
05-26-2016 11:59 PM
Thalassa4
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
My transition was pretty well accepted. My mom had appreciated vegetarianism for many years - she had even tried being vegetarian when she was young. One of my dad's long-time coworkers was a lifelong vegetarian, so my dad didn't voice any worries about it either. They even tolerated me putting slaughterhouse pictures on my bedroom door when I was still living at home (I was young, OK??).

Only one issue arouse: My mom felt hurt when I became vegetarian, because she thought that I was rejecting the food that she lovingly raised me on. She didn't tell me about it until years after I became vegetarian.

.
Although I never put slaughterhouse pictures on my bedroom door, I've been a Texas Chainsaw Massacre fan, since age 17, which actually is a quintessential vegetarian film though some people don't realize it. Just watched it again last night.
05-26-2016 11:56 PM
Thalassa4 Yay! I love the happy stories!
05-22-2016 01:46 PM
Beautiful Joe My sister went vegetarian shortly after I did. She went vegan shortly before I cut out dairy and eggs. Now, in our older years, we live together, which is very nice - having a plant based kitchen, enjoying the same foods, having the same viewpoints about animals.
05-22-2016 11:45 AM
shellie My whole family is very supportive. For a while I was questioning whether I should stay vegetarian or not after a relative (also vegetarian) committed some horrible acts. It was weirding me out that we shared something in common. My family convinced me it would be silly to give up something important to me because of him.
05-21-2016 01:36 PM
David3 My transition was pretty well accepted. My mom had appreciated vegetarianism for many years - she had even tried being vegetarian when she was young. One of my dad's long-time coworkers was a lifelong vegetarian, so my dad didn't voice any worries about it either. They even tolerated me putting slaughterhouse pictures on my bedroom door when I was still living at home (I was young, OK??).

Only one issue arouse: My mom felt hurt when I became vegetarian, because she thought that I was rejecting the food that she lovingly raised me on. She didn't tell me about it until years after I became vegetarian.

.
05-21-2016 10:33 AM
ElaineV When I was six I came home and announced that I wasn't going to eat animals any more. My mom (single mom at the time) basically said "ok" and as a result we went pescatarian for two years. That was sort of the compromise. Then after two years we stopped eating fishes and other sea creatures. As an adult I went vegan with my supportive husband. When I did that my mom was already close to vegan and she was very supportive and went vegan herself. My sister, who was vegetarian and close to vegan already was really nervous about it and felt judged and didn't react totally positively but eventually she mellowed out about it and went vegan herself too!
05-21-2016 12:26 AM
@rno Most of my family is vegetarian. And the meat eating part (in law) are used to our way of living. So on birthday parties there is more vegetarian food than meat.
05-20-2016 05:06 AM
wildflowerliz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa4 View Post
In the beginning I used to complain about how I was coerced to "eat my meat" when it was served as a child, but after a long conversation with my extremely traditional sister, I realized I mostly ate oats for breakfast, and peanut butter or cheese toast, for breakfast when older. For lunch I frequently had peanut butter, cheese, or egg salad sandwiches. I was offered fresh fruit, vegetables and pickles for snacks. Dinner could include meat, or be pinto or butter beans. I had entire vegetarian days in my childhood, and other wise ate small portions of meat. My uncle encouraged me to eat cream of celery soup with Ms.Dash.

I was in no way raised in a vegetarian family. But we ate small portions of meat by today's standards. In fact often our meat was fish.

I have been lucky to have an immediate family open to vegetarian or vegan meals, or at least more humane farm practices.

Does anyone else here see support within their families, if they look closer?

No , if there were any rogue meat eaters here, we were not on welfare. We had brand name peanut butter, real blocks of cheese, and my grandparents grew nearly every vegetable and made their own grape jelly, they were proud Republicans, though my mother and sister are not. My family intentionally ate that way. We ate a lot of fruits, beans, cheese, etc.

I really this idea for a thread, its so positive!!! I do spend a lot of time fretting over the negative aspects of being vegan around other people, so I love the idea of focusing on some positive things.

My parents have been really great. My fiancé and I went to their house with our daughter for a cook out, and not only did they let us cook heaps of potatoes and veggies on the grill, but both of my parents ate strictly vegan with us. They agreed not to cook any meat on the grill (which is a big deal for my dad) and they didn't complain about it once. They have also been really great about supporting my 5 year old daughter in this transition to veganism. My mom has been buying vegan pizza and ice cream, and my dad even found some organic vegan lollipops for her when she looks in his pockets for treats

Speaking of that, my daughter has been amazing in this transition! She went to a birthday party the other day, where they had vegan pizza and cake for her, and she told me that one of the boys there offered her some of his non-vegan ice cream, since she didn't have any. She said no thank you, because it wasn't vegan! So I am very proud of her.

My fiancé is being extremely supportive of me as well. He has agreed to eat 100% plant based at home. So nothing comes into our home that isn't vegan. He recently told me that he isn't ready to eat all plant-based all the time, so we agreed that when he/we eat out (without our daughter) he can eat whatever he likes. He has even agreed to allow our wedding to be all vegan- which has been such a HUGE relief for me! He is really being amazing and it definitely isn't easy all of the time- we still fight now and then- I feel like it is really heading in a good direction.
05-20-2016 02:58 AM
Naturebound My family have been mostly supportive of my veganism. At first they were worried, and rightfully so, because I was trying to recover from anorexia at the time I went vegan and was underweight. It took some time and patience for them to come around and see that my diet was not going to be so restrictive. I made a lot of vegan treats and hardy foods and shared them with family to show them how creative and fulfilling plant based eating can be. They were open to trying them because they know I am an excellent cook, and they were surprised at how awesome vegan food is. Over time my Mom and sister took more of an interest and eventually made attempts to go vegan themselves. My sister was strictly vegan for two years but eventually settled on vegetarian. She is on a very limited budget, struggles with severe mental illness, and relies on food shelves and other charities often for her food, so she has had to be a little more flexible. I buy her groceries and make her stuff when I can. My Mom has a gluten intolerance and has bouts of severe diverticulitis which means she can not eat stuff like nuts, seeds (even in fruits like strawberries), corn kernals. She was strictly vegan for about six months and lost half her hair. But I think she was too restrictive with what she allowed herself to eat because she was trying to lose weight also (talk about the irony as they had been so worried about me). She went back to meat and dairy for a while, and has been back and forth with eating vegan. I spent hours with her at first, even made her a three ring binder FULL of gluten free vegan food ideas and recipes. I had her supplement with DHA since she can't have nuts/seeds. But she would go back to bingeing on fast food, dairy, meat (she struggles with binge eating disorder). All that said, they are still supportive of my veganism, and they love my dishes I bring to get togethers. We eat exclusively gluten free vegan at holidays together which is awesome of them to do for me.

My Dad is supportive of my veganism. He has even encouraged me when i was doing some animal rights activism for a while, leafleting and tabling and so on. He also loves my vegan dishes I make for him when I see him once per year (he lives very far away out of state). He has never questioned my veganism.

My partner whom I have been with for 18 years struggled with it at first. it took him over a year to come around. Now is is much more supportive. he goes weeks without eating meat, and is mostly vegetarian at home. Coming from dairy farmers and being a former deer hunter and whose family are all hunters, this is fairly impressive. For the most part he has been encouraging about my veganism, though we don't see eye to eye on all issues. He has been respectful as far as not using my dishes/silverware/cookware for animal based foods. We do keep separate cupboards for our foods and separate areas of the refrigerator for our own foods. He's even stopped eating eggs for a long time now, but can't give up his dairy. But overall he has been supportive. We've gone to animal rights causes together when they involve wild animals like wolves (we are both against legalizing wolf hunting). He has a harder time with farm animal issues though. Small steps. He actually helped me leaflet downtown once. I do suspect if we didn't live together or know each other he would never come to veganism or even vegetarianism on his own. I am certain he does it more for me than anything else, though his own doctors have told him to cut back on dairy due to him having high cholesterol and suffering with RA.

My partner's family have not been as supportive about my veganism, but they aren't horrible either, at least most of them. I bring all my own food to get togethers, and they like to try my dishes and enjoy them. But they are not quiet in their belief that farm animals are there for humans to use. We have very different beliefs in a lot of areas, but we don't argue about it. We just try to find common ground and keep the peace.

I've been fortunate to have very little nastiness as far as my veganism, though my partner made stupid jokes about it at first. After I threatened to leave him he stopped lol. I am the bread winner and very independent so I think that has helped me. I also have total control of the kitchen and I make all our dinners.
05-19-2016 09:07 PM
Aliakai
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalassa4 View Post
In the beginning I used to complain about how I was coerced to "eat my meat" when it was served as a child, but after a long conversation with my extremely traditional sister, I realized I mostly ate oats for breakfast, and peanut butter or cheese toast, for breakfast when older. For lunch I frequently had peanut butter, cheese, or egg salad sandwiches. I was offered fresh fruit, vegetables and pickles for snacks. Dinner could include meat, or be pinto or butter beans. I had entire vegetarian days in my childhood, and other wise ate small portions of meat. My uncle encouraged me to eat cream of celery soup with Ms.Dash.

I was in no way raised in a vegetarian family. But we ate small portions of meat by today's standards. In fact often our meat was fish.

I have been lucky to have an immediate family open to vegetarian or vegan meals, or at least more humane farm practices.

Does anyone else here see support within their families, if they look closer?

No , if there were any rogue meat eaters here, we were not on welfare. We had brand name peanut butter, real blocks of cheese, and my grandparents grew nearly every vegetable and made their own grape jelly, they were proud Republicans, though my mother and sister are not. My family intentionally ate that way. We ate a lot of fruits, beans, cheese, etc.
My birth family was strictly Atkins, so most plant foods were heavily restricted growing up. We subsisted mostly on eggs, cheese, milk, low carb breads and snacks, lots and lots of meat, and vegetables often smothered in gravy or cheese sauce.

That said, my older sisters, when they found out I was vegan, cooked myself and my guys a vegan meal, checking with me repeatedly to make sure that none of the ingredients they were using violated my dietary practices. My mother in law frequently comes to the wine tastings that I host and compliments our food, stating that in her opinion anyone who thinks my hubby is deprived is stupid because he eats more gourmet food by her standards than he ever did growing up.
05-19-2016 08:23 PM
Thalassa4
Does Anyone Have Happy Family Stories???

In the beginning I used to complain about how I was coerced to "eat my meat" when it was served as a child, but after a long conversation with my extremely traditional sister, I realized I mostly ate oats for breakfast, and peanut butter or cheese toast, for breakfast when older. For lunch I frequently had peanut butter, cheese, or egg salad sandwiches. I was offered fresh fruit, vegetables and pickles for snacks. Dinner could include meat, or be pinto or butter beans. I had entire vegetarian days in my childhood, and other wise ate small portions of meat. My uncle encouraged me to eat cream of celery soup with Ms.Dash.

I was in no way raised in a vegetarian family. But we ate small portions of meat by today's standards. In fact often our meat was fish.

I have been lucky to have an immediate family open to vegetarian or vegan meals, or at least more humane farm practices.

Does anyone else here see support within their families, if they look closer?

No , if there were any rogue meat eaters here, we were not on welfare. We had brand name peanut butter, real blocks of cheese, and my grandparents grew nearly every vegetable and made their own grape jelly, they were proud Republicans, though my mother and sister are not. My family intentionally ate that way. We ate a lot of fruits, beans, cheese, etc.

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