VeggieBoards - Reply to Topic

Thread: Is it okay if I rant for a second? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-03-2016 05:15 AM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by janetc View Post
Perhaps I am not understanding people's definition of animal rescues and animal shelters. I think of animal shelters as what is also known as the "pound." Am I misinterpreting the definition? Usually run by city or county.

I think of rescues as groups that go to animal shelters, rescue animals to keep them from being euthanized, get them healthy, etc., and then adopt them out to people.
My apologies for the reaction. Also, my apologies for not clarifying in my original post that "adoption places" included rescues/shelters/et cetera prior to going to a breeder.
02-03-2016 03:28 AM
Naturebound In my city, there is a huge event once per year called "cutest puppy contest" that is held at a local shopping mall. Anyone can register their dog, but they must be between one and four months old. They take the first sixty or so contestants, and booths are set up for each person to sit with their dog while people go around and see the dogs and vote on the cutest one. Whoever gets the most votes wins some kind of monetary award and so on. There are the top five or ten or something like that.

We entered our dog Sable when she was a puppy in 2005. Sable is a mix (lab/springer/newfie) we acquired from a local humane society shelter. At any rate, people seemed to adore her and we thought for sure we would be the winners lol. Out of 74 contestents. But she didn't even make it in the top ten. Every one of the top ten puppies with the most votes were fancy purebred dogs. Every one of them. Some were owned by breeders who gave out their cards to visitors. And yet all the while when we talked to hundreds of people going around looking at the puppies, they all thought it was great Sable was a rescue and that we went that route instead of a breeder. So imagine our disappointment and shock that all the rescues, mixed breeds etc were ignored in favor of the purebreds. So disgusted we only went back to one more contest as visitors to vote for every non purebred dog entered. and of course that year again it was a purebred that won. So we have boycotted it since. Besides, the whole point of the contest is part of a wider celebration of a famous dog musher race that takes place up here once per year (John Beargrease Sled Dog Race), something else I do not support anyway.

I love dogs, purebred or not. But as others have pointed out, there are far too many dogs and other domesticated animals who are abandoned, lost, abused, taken for granted, and allowed to keep reproducing that many lives end up being wasted and tragically put down. It is heartbreaking. So I can not imagine in my right mind why anyone would choose to spend a fortune on a dog bred for profit and to showcase a particular "breed" when there are so so many perfectly wonderful animals in need of homes that are going to be destroyed or spend their lives in cages and shelters otherwise. Regardless of the attitude of any particular person or rescue organization, in the end it is the animal that matters, right?

Sable may not be a purebred, she may not meet someone's standards, she may not have won that puppy contest, but she has had a great life and she has two people that love and care for her as they would care for a child. She is the child I never got to have (I was hysterectomized at a young age). We didn't acquire her in half an hour. it was not a spur of the moment decision. It was something we thought out long and hard, prepared for financially, and searched long and hard. We went through an application and interview process. We had other dogs we had wanted but someone else got first. Sable was a wonderful find though. I would never ever acquire an animal from a breeder or from a pet store, if for no other reason than not to support/encourage those places to keep producing more domesticated animals the world can't handle. Having any "pet" is not something I will ever again take lightly, and I can not support breeding when there are so many animals being put down and suffering already in this world. It's bad enough that so many domesticated "pets" require animal food which means even more animals have to suffer and die in the farming industry to feed them.
02-02-2016 07:53 PM
janetc Wow, I really don't understand your reaction to my post. Earlier in the post, Eternal Sunshine wrote:

"I do want to ask, though, if you visited a shelter in addition to the rescues.
We got our dog in about half an hour at the shelter, and most of that was waiting for him to be microchipped. His adoption fee was waived due to a seasonal promotion, and we got a waiver for a free visit from an extensive list of local vets (including the one we saw with my late cat.) Despite some minor infections from having spent the last five years in a meth lab, our boy is happy and healthy. Long story short, definitely check out your local shelter if you haven't. They're much more relaxed than rescues, and can be a more frugal option as well."

and you liked the post.

I wrote the same thing - animal shelter - and you seemed offended and - to me - outraged. And you asked if I "read your post." I read your post very carefully, looking for the term "animal shelter." To see if you had explored that option.

I did not oversimplify your post - you said adoption - rescue - never animal shelter. You never once stated that you went to an animal shelter. Never in your post. So I'm not sure what it was that I said - using the same definition - that upset you.

And what I say in the majority of ANIMAL SHELTERS is a blatant fact. If they're not adopted or rescued, they do NOT make it out alive. Sorry if you think I oversimplify, but honestly the facts are pretty simple - and pretty depressing. Millions of animals are killed in shelters in the U.S.

---

ETA: Perhaps I am not understanding people's definition of animal rescues and animal shelters. I think of animal shelters as what is also known as the "pound." Am I misinterpreting the definition? Usually run by city or county.

I think of rescues as groups that go to animal shelters, rescue animals to keep them from being euthanized, get them healthy, etc., and then adopt them out to people.
02-02-2016 02:31 PM
silva While I don't disbelieve the stories of overly controlling rescue groups, I have never, ever, heard of a place that doesn't have dogs of all ages advertised online and newspapers directly from families.
I would imagine there are would be no no-kill shelters in those areas

I still can't see any reason to go with a breeder
02-02-2016 02:11 PM
amira23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladyjay View Post
@TailFin . I understand your story well. I went from rescue to rescue trying to get a dog and all of them had ridiculously long applications and the ones that didn't were not calling back to follow up. My last straw was when I reached out to a rescue on fb and offered to foster and adopt 2 medium sized dogs that they claimed needed to be together because they were siblings. The underlying reason was discrimination. I asked to take them in and they sent me literature on how bad it is to raise littermates together and yadda yadda yadda. Yet these same people claimed earlier that they did not want them separated!!! Month went by and some other lady had adopted both of them.

So I went to a breeder and got the dog that I wanted. She is a purebred Golden and we love her. If I do get another pet in the future I will look to go to the animal shelter. I still believe in rescue organizations, but I think they get a little self righteous at times about these animals. Turning down perfectly good people who would love to take the animals in. Over something that they don't like from the application.
Your story could have been written by me. I tried to adopt through a rescue. After filling out their application form, I waited for a reply. After a couple of weeks I tried to contact them again through email. I got no response. To give some background, I have had this particular breed since childhood and it fits my lifestyle very well. I finally gave up and went to a breeder who was recommended by my retired breeder and bought a dog. Good breeders don't want backyard people wrecking their breeds and will give you a discount and a limited registration which specifies no litters from your dog will be registered. Excellent breeders will also take the dog back if you must give it up for any reason. I have bought 7 dogs from breeders that are so careful that they have actually eliminated a bad inherited trait from this particular breed in their bloodlines. The breeder I bought this latest dog from called my veterinary to make sure I was a responsible pet owner and checked with my retired breeder to see what kind of pet owner I am. The so called rescue outfit didn't even call me back or set up a meeting. They really defeated their purpose in not giving a person who would also foster dogs a chance to adopt. I will never go through a rescue again.
02-02-2016 02:07 PM
dormouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post
That's the problem right there. Your feelings are hurt because you get "guff", and the one who's hurt isn't the rescue(s) with which you have a beef, it's that one additional dog who gets the death penalty because someone's ego is injured.
Very much this.

Adopting the right dog can certainly be a process. Shelters are easier to adopt from, but you'd have to be patient if you're looking for a certain type of dog. You can't obtain a child instantly; it often takes work (whether you're making one or adopting) and time. Why should we expect quicker gratification when adding a furry family member?

Rescues are all different. They're run independently, often by volunteers, which explains why it can be so difficult to get a response from some of them. It also explains why they can seem unprofessional. They are literally not professionals. They're not vets or dog behavior experts. They'll also all have different adoption requirements. I worked at a private, no-kill shelter that had adoption requirements that some people found strict, but there was no requirement that people have a fence. It was my job to process adoption applications; it was not a fun job.

Walking away from a rescue group or a shelter because of how unprofessional the people are does not hurt those people. Rescues (for the most part) are not making money off their work, even if the adoption fees seem high. It's the animals that suffer these consequences.

The best advice I have for anybody looking to adopt at any point in the near future is to begin volunteering at a shelter or rescue, for a few reasons: 1) You'll get the inside scoop on how they work and the process will make more sense to you. 2) You'll get to know the animals really well and figure out what type of animal really suits you. I started as a volunteer at the SPCA thinking I loved spunky labradors; now I have a lazy pit bull mix. 3)Volunteers are desperately needed. By being a conscientious volunteer you can not only help care for animals and improve their lives but improve the image and reputation of animal shelters/rescues. 4) If you are looking for a specific type of dog, you're more likely to see when one comes in to the shelter/rescue before others do.
02-02-2016 01:37 PM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
Maybe I would have asked the rescues if they knew of others who would waive the fenced yard requirement. Maybe I would have gotten on several local shelters pre-approved lists and awaited a small dog with short hair that didn't bark a lot, or whatever specific requirements I had. Could have checked the internet for rescues father afield and driven to get him.

<snip>

Things to think about for the future, definitely. Appreciate the comments.

For the record, we attempted to adopt a dog in North Carolina, which is a very long drive for us, but we were told we were "too far away".

It's not like we didn't try.
02-02-2016 12:45 PM
LedBoots Maybe I would have asked the rescues if they knew of others who would waive the fenced yard requirement. Maybe I would have gotten on several local shelters pre-approved lists and awaited a small dog with short hair that didn't bark a lot, or whatever specific requirements I had. Could have checked the internet for rescues father afield and driven to get him. I could have adopted a cat instead, or a bunny.

But knowing what I know and being vegan, I couldn't have gone to a breeder.
02-02-2016 11:19 AM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post
That's the problem right there. Your feelings are hurt because you get "guff", and the one who's hurt isn't the rescue(s) with which you have a beef, it's that one additional dog who gets the death penalty because someone's ego is injured.
I hope my wording here isn't describing me being upset or cross. I'm not upset. I guess I'm a little too blunt sometimes for the internet. Personally, I think your ego comment was a little gratuitous.

Sorry, I'm not biting. If they would rather have the dog get put to death* than to be subjected to a dog park *gasp*, that's on them, not me. I'm not responsible for that, and I can't force them to allow me to adopt the dog. If I don't fit their requirements, they can absolutely deny me. That's their right. In that case, I have the right to go somewhere else. That's not being hurt, guff, or having an 'injured ego'; that's living in the real world, not living in a hypothetical situation. If someone can't offer what I want, I go somewhere else. For example, if the restaurant you wanted to go to is closed for the night, you don't stand there banging on the door demanding to be seated for a meal, you simply go somewhere else.

I'm asking for honest feedback here, not being 'smart': if they deny my application, and other 'rescues' have the same a fenced backyard requirement, how am I supposed to move forward?

*The rescues were no-kill, so this point is hypothetical.
02-02-2016 09:43 AM
Beautiful Joe
Quote:
Originally Posted by TailFin View Post
They lost with me, because I went somewhere else and left a poor puppy without a home.
That's the problem right there. Your feelings are hurt because you get "guff", and the one who's hurt isn't the rescue(s) with which you have a beef, it's that one additional dog who gets the death penalty because someone's ego is injured.
02-02-2016 07:26 AM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
~snip edit~

You see, the rescues care more about their animals than they do your feelings. They have spent a lot of time, love, and money rescuing these animals. When they have rules, it is usually from past experience with poor adoption outcomes. You may be the exceptional owner without a fenced backyard, but in their experience, dogs do better with fenced yards.

So they are playing the odds, not the individual. I wouldn't take it so personally.
Isn't that the same excuse that insurance companies use? When I was under the age of 25 my rates were higher, because I'm male. When I turned 25, I magically became a better driver. So, if I buy a house with a fence, I'll magically become a better pet owner? I don't think it works like that.

I don't take it personally. They can play the odds. They lost with me, because I went somewhere else and left a poor puppy without a home.
02-02-2016 07:01 AM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by TailFin View Post
The problem is, I can turn around my thinking. I usually do. There is a limit, though. A rescue has to balance the needs of the animal and the needs of the rescue. They can't advertise that they desperately need help adopting animals out and then get hesitant over minor opinions when there are perfectly good applicants ready and willing with experience. It doesn't work that way. If they don't want to adopt their animals out, then they can't call themselves a 'rescue'.

If I turn around my perspective, I would say that I don't want the dog going to a family that is going to beat it, or leave it outside, or [insert thing you shouldn't do]. However, if I see an application that checks off almost all of my wants and they are perfectly normal people after an interview, I'd let the dog get adopted out. I'd rather the dog go to a permanent home faster than be stuck in cage until I find the perfect applicants.

Many of the shelters/rescues/etc I've dealt with have absolutely acted in a self-righteous manner, which is similar to @Ladyjay 's experience. I don't mind filling applications out. I have no issue with that; what I do take issue with is having me fill out an application when they know they're going to deny me based on their opinion of one minor, negative checkmark. Come visit my house, come see my neighborhood, come see where I live. I'll take off work to show them around. If they don't have time for that, I'll send pictures, or a video. Outside of that, what do they want, groveling? I'm not groveling.

Unfortunately, I find that people rarely can see my perspective, unless they've been in a similar situation, like @Ladyjay . I didn't get this way from one bad experience with one 'rescue'; it's been multiple experiences with multiple 'rescues'.

On a side note, I agree that dogs shouldn't be left outside or in a garage. The problem is when they firmly require a fenced backyard but don't care how that backyard is used. They didn't ask: do you have a backyard and how are you going to use it? We had a fenced dog park (which had separate big/small dog areas), and we take our dogs on fairly long walks. A lot longer than people with dogs with twice the size and exercise requirement than our dogs. So, I'm not buying their opinions.


I'm sorry that you had to deal with a similar situation, as well. We had the same issues--getting no response until we called and asked about our application. The wife and I were going to try to do the foster thing, but after dealing with these shelters, we didn't want to be locked into regular communication with them, haha.

I totally agree with you. In the future, I will likely go to an animal shelter, but the second I get any gruff from them, I'm gone. If they want animals adopted, and they have a good application in front of them, they'll let us adopt the dog. If not, we'll go to a breeder. Simple as that.

We are not pandering to their every whim and desire.
.
~snip edit~

You see, the rescues care more about their animals than they do your feelings. They have spent a lot of time, love, and money rescuing these animals. When they have rules, it is usually from past experience with poor adoption outcomes. You may be the exceptional owner without a fenced backyard, but in their experience, dogs do better with fenced yards.

So they are playing the odds, not the individual. I wouldn't take it so personally.
02-02-2016 06:10 AM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by janetc View Post
The animal shelters have thousands of dogs who have a 0% chance of making it out alive.

A breeder isn't the only option.
Did you read the entire post? You have oversimplified the situation to a point that is almost offensive.

In our case, a rescue wasn't the only option.

I don't understand the perspective of blindly supporting something. If there is a problem, acknowledge it and fix it.
02-02-2016 05:58 AM
TailFin
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieSince88 View Post
I can certainly understand the frustration you're expressing, but I'd ask that you not let it color your feelings about rescue/adoption organizations in a negative way. The last time I adopted it literally took a couple of hours to fill out the application--but I didn't mind. To me, the fact that they're asking for important information like where the pet will be kept and whether my fence is tall enough for a giant breed dog, made me happy. Their policy is to not adopt to people whose pets are relegated to the backyard or garage or laundry room; they want to KNOW that the pet will be in the house, with the human family, and will be safe when outside for pottying/playing. I have no problem with that--those are the same things *I* would want to know if I were adopting out a pet. I wouldn't want them to go to just anybody...like the pets advertised on CraigsList, for example...

If you can turn around the thinking, i.e., look at it from the perspective of YOU being in the position of choosing who can adopt a pet, that might help you see that they're only doing what's in the best interest of the animal.
The problem is, I can turn around my thinking. I usually do. There is a limit, though. A rescue has to balance the needs of the animal and the needs of the rescue. They can't advertise that they desperately need help adopting animals out and then get hesitant over minor opinions when there are perfectly good applicants ready and willing with experience. It doesn't work that way. If they don't want to adopt their animals out, then they can't call themselves a 'rescue'.

If I turn around my perspective, I would say that I don't want the dog going to a family that is going to beat it, or leave it outside, or [insert thing you shouldn't do]. However, if I see an application that checks off almost all of my wants and they are perfectly normal people after an interview, I'd let the dog get adopted out. I'd rather the dog go to a permanent home faster than be stuck in cage until I find the perfect applicants.

Many of the shelters/rescues/etc I've dealt with have absolutely acted in a self-righteous manner, which is similar to @Ladyjay 's experience. I don't mind filling applications out. I have no issue with that; what I do take issue with is having me fill out an application when they know they're going to deny me based on their opinion of one minor, negative checkmark. Come visit my house, come see my neighborhood, come see where I live. I'll take off work to show them around. If they don't have time for that, I'll send pictures, or a video. Outside of that, what do they want, groveling? I'm not groveling.

Unfortunately, I find that people rarely can see my perspective, unless they've been in a similar situation, like @Ladyjay . I didn't get this way from one bad experience with one 'rescue'; it's been multiple experiences with multiple 'rescues'.

On a side note, I agree that dogs shouldn't be left outside or in a garage. The problem is when they firmly require a fenced backyard but don't care how that backyard is used. They didn't ask: do you have a backyard and how are you going to use it? We had a fenced dog park (which had separate big/small dog areas), and we take our dogs on fairly long walks. A lot longer than people with dogs with twice the size and exercise requirement than our dogs. So, I'm not buying their opinions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladyjay View Post
@TailFin . I understand your story well. I went from rescue to rescue trying to get a dog and all of them had ridiculously long applications and the ones that didn't were not calling back to follow up. My last straw was when I reached out to a rescue on fb and offered to foster and adopt 2 medium sized dogs that they claimed needed to be together because they were siblings. The underlying reason was discrimination. I asked to take them in and they sent me literature on how bad it is to raise littermates together and yadda yadda yadda. Yet these same people claimed earlier that they did not want them separated!!! Month went by and some other lady had adopted both of them.

So I went to a breeder and got the dog that I wanted. She is a purebred Golden and we love her. If I do get another pet in the future I will look to go to the animal shelter. I still believe in rescue organizations, but I think they get a little self righteous at times about these animals. Turning down perfectly good people who would love to take the animals in. Over something that they don't like from the application.
I'm sorry that you had to deal with a similar situation, as well. We had the same issues--getting no response until we called and asked about our application. The wife and I were going to try to do the foster thing, but after dealing with these shelters, we didn't want to be locked into regular communication with them, haha.

I totally agree with you. In the future, I will likely go to an animal shelter, but the second I get any gruff from them, I'm gone. If they want animals adopted, and they have a good application in front of them, they'll let us adopt the dog. If not, we'll go to a breeder. Simple as that.

We are not pandering to their every whim and desire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eternal Sunshine View Post
@TailFin That sounds like a harrowing experience, and you deserve major kudos for sticking it out with your sweet girl. After an experience like that, I can't really blame you for going to a breeder. I do want to ask, though, if you visited a shelter in addition to the rescues. We got our dog in about half an hour at the shelter, and most of that was waiting for him to be microchipped. His adoption fee was waived due to a seasonal promotion, and we got a waiver for a free visit from an extensive list of local vets (including the one we saw with my late cat.) Despite some minor infections from having spent the last five years in a meth lab, our boy is happy and healthy. Long story short, definitely check out your local shelter if you haven't. They're much more relaxed than rescues, and can be a more frugal option as well.
Thanks; we did check out all of the local shelters. One issue we were having at the time was a breed/weight requirement. Most of the shelters had large dogs or breeds that didn't fit the requirements. Whenever we saw a smaller dog, they were either already adopted out or 'on hold' for so-and-so's family.
02-02-2016 05:39 AM
janetc
Quote:
Originally Posted by TailFin View Post
I'd like to add my own little 'rant' to this discussion. Sorry if it's long.

Little backstory: my family has had dogs for a long time. I've grown up with dogs and a multitude of other animals (e.g., birds, turtles, mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, cats). I know how to act around them, I know what they need, I know how to take care of them. I worked for a few months as a veterinary assistant, so I have a good rapport with the vet (one of the best in our area). I'm not saying I'm perfect, but I would consider myself a good pet owner. The wife was typically afraid of dogs growing up, but she got accustomed to my family's dogs, we then got a dog, and now we're on our second. She's a very good mom to our dog.

Now, to begin my rant, when the wife and I started looking for a dog, we immediately went to adopt. We needed a smaller dog due to various reasons, one being we like smaller dogs and two we had breed/size restrictions in our first place. So, we found a dog we thought was really cute, seemed to fit with our personality, and it was good for size restrictions. We asked about adopting and were given a twelve page application, asking for numerous references, vet references, and an essay. Wow, are you kidding? Well, we filled out the application. After a week, we didn't hear anything, so we checked with the adoption place. They flat out denied our request, because we didn't have a fenced yard. Mind you, our apartment complex had a fenced dog park, which was explicitly stated in the application. Nope, we were denied.

So, we had similar issues with other adoption places, where they would essentially refuse us, because we didn't have our own fenced yard. Well, we finally found a Norwich terrier (it was listed as a Cairn) that was found dumped off at some local park. The adoption place seemed nice enough, and didn't seem to mind that we didn't have a fenced yard. We adopted the dog the same day we went to see her. The lady gave some sob story about how the dog was returned after being adopted out previously, etc. Prior to adopting her, we were given the vet's report on her, and it mentioned a 'possible heart murmur'. Well, when we took her to our vet, he said that any first year biology student would have recognized it. Our vet said she had a grade 5 to 6 heart murmur and was pretty much in the middle of congestive heart failure. We asked how the other vet indicated it as a 'possible' heart murmur when it was obviously anything but. According to him, some adoption places put out 'faked' reports to get certain dogs (i.e., the ones that are costing them a lot) adopted at any cost to the new owners. Thelma got so bad after a few weeks, that she was winded just walking up and down the steps to go outside. I started carrying her up and down. We bought steps for her to get on the couch to sleep, since she couldn't jump up.

The wife and I didn't have the heart to return Thelma, as she was so sweet and settled in really well. Unfortunately for us, we had to shell out over a hundred dollars a month in prescriptions, and that didn't include the literally thousands of dollars we spent in taking her to the vet over the course of a year. Our first vet bill alone was over $600 due to having x-rays and a slew of other tests. Thelma passed away almost to the year after we adopted her. Despite all of this, we were glad we gave her a happy last year of her life and we didn't regret adopting her.

That said, within a week of adopting Thelma, we requested that the adoption place return our adoption fee of $250 due to what happened and what our vet indicated. I was greeted with a belligerent response indicating that they didn't have to return any money and that I should be ashamed for asking for the money back. Well, after a few awkward exchanges, we received our adoption fee.

Based on everything that happened to us, our opinion on adoption places has completely changed. Initially, we were happy to go dog-adoption hunting. Now, we don't want anything to do with adoption places. It's a shame that adoption places are going to actively refuse good people that are looking to adopt a dog. They are going to lie outright when trying to 'get rid of dogs' they don't want. The restrictions on trying to adopt a dog are so insanely hard, that we didn't want to go through that heartache, pain, and stress again. Applications that are pages and pages long, with essays? Nope. These places would rather us go to a breeder or even worse, when there's a dog in need right there. That's a shame. They should be ashamed. Until adoption places can change the way they act, we won't be visiting them in the foreseeable future.

This may not be the most popular opinion here, but... we went to a local breeder to get our current dog, and we're happy we did. Sorry, no regrets here.

We may attempt the adoption process in the future, but I'm not guaranteeing anything.
The animal shelters have thousands of dogs who have a 0% chance of making it out alive.

A breeder isn't the only option.
02-01-2016 10:27 PM
Eternal Sunshine
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieSince88 View Post
I would absolutely share your disgust, Eternal Sunshine. I can't stand hypocrites of any kind, but I'm particularly touchy when it comes to animals.

You might want to educate your sister about rescue groups for purebred dogs/cats. When I had dogs, I had Great Danes, my very favorite breed. If my health allowed having dogs now, I'd definitely get another Great Dane--from a rescue organization, like my favorite, Gentle Giants Rescue & Adoption. So if she MUST have a purebred dog or cat, there are plenty of them available for rescue/adoption, from local shelters to rescue groups, they're out there!
I did call her out on it, but I had to retract my statement pretty quickly because she's kind of my landlord and holds that over my head. (We rent her condo, planning to buy it from her once we fix up our credit.)

And I definitely did tell her about purebred rescues. I even sent her links and contact information for adoptable dogs and puppies that were the breed she was looking for. But she still chose to drop $1200 (plus doggy DNA testing fees) on a puppy from a breeder. It was so disappointing.

On top of that, when I was looking for my dog, she kept sending me links to puppies being given away for free because someone didn't bother to spay their dog. I don't know how many times I had to tell her we were looking for an adult dog.
02-01-2016 10:20 PM
Eternal Sunshine @TailFin That sounds like a harrowing experience, and you deserve major kudos for sticking it out with your sweet girl. After an experience like that, I can't really blame you for going to a breeder. I do want to ask, though, if you visited a shelter in addition to the rescues. We got our dog in about half an hour at the shelter, and most of that was waiting for him to be microchipped. His adoption fee was waived due to a seasonal promotion, and we got a waiver for a free visit from an extensive list of local vets (including the one we saw with my late cat.) Despite some minor infections from having spent the last five years in a meth lab, our boy is happy and healthy. Long story short, definitely check out your local shelter if you haven't. They're much more relaxed than rescues, and can be a more frugal option as well.
02-01-2016 07:24 PM
Beautiful Joe
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieSince88 View Post
I can certainly understand the frustration you're expressing, but I'd ask that you not let it color your feelings about rescue/adoption organizations in a negative way. The last time I adopted it literally took a couple of hours to fill out the application--but I didn't mind. To me, the fact that they're asking for important information like where the pet will be kept and whether my fence is tall enough for a giant breed dog, made me happy. Their policy is to not adopt to people whose pets are relegated to the backyard or garage or laundry room; they want to KNOW that the pet will be in the house, with the human family, and will be safe when outside for pottying/playing. I have no problem with that--those are the same things *I* would want to know if I were adopting out a pet. I wouldn't want them to go to just anybody...like the pets advertised on CraigsList, for example...

If you can turn around the thinking, i.e., look at it from the perspective of YOU being in the position of choosing who can adopt a pet, that might help you see that they're only doing what's in the best interest of the animal.
This.

I believe that there are some unreasonable rescues out there; I just haven't encountered any personally. I don't mind filling out long applications, providing vet references, and having pre-adoption home visits. If any of my animals survive me, I sure hope that whoever places them in new homes takes at least that degree of care in placing them.

One of my dogs' microchip will forever be registered in the name of the rescue from which I adopted her. It's a practice I applaud and understand, because the rescue will always be notified if one of their dogs ever ends up in another shelter or pound.
02-01-2016 05:09 PM
Ladyjay @TailFin . I understand your story well. I went from rescue to rescue trying to get a dog and all of them had ridiculously long applications and the ones that didn't were not calling back to follow up. My last straw was when I reached out to a rescue on fb and offered to foster and adopt 2 medium sized dogs that they claimed needed to be together because they were siblings. The underlying reason was discrimination. I asked to take them in and they sent me literature on how bad it is to raise littermates together and yadda yadda yadda. Yet these same people claimed earlier that they did not want them separated!!! Month went by and some other lady had adopted both of them.

So I went to a breeder and got the dog that I wanted. She is a purebred Golden and we love her. If I do get another pet in the future I will look to go to the animal shelter. I still believe in rescue organizations, but I think they get a little self righteous at times about these animals. Turning down perfectly good people who would love to take the animals in. Over something that they don't like from the application.
02-01-2016 02:03 PM
VeggieSince88
Quote:
Originally Posted by TailFin View Post
I'd like to add my own little 'rant' to this discussion. Sorry if it's long.
<snip>
I can certainly understand the frustration you're expressing, but I'd ask that you not let it color your feelings about rescue/adoption organizations in a negative way. The last time I adopted it literally took a couple of hours to fill out the application--but I didn't mind. To me, the fact that they're asking for important information like where the pet will be kept and whether my fence is tall enough for a giant breed dog, made me happy. Their policy is to not adopt to people whose pets are relegated to the backyard or garage or laundry room; they want to KNOW that the pet will be in the house, with the human family, and will be safe when outside for pottying/playing. I have no problem with that--those are the same things *I* would want to know if I were adopting out a pet. I wouldn't want them to go to just anybody...like the pets advertised on CraigsList, for example...

If you can turn around the thinking, i.e., look at it from the perspective of YOU being in the position of choosing who can adopt a pet, that might help you see that they're only doing what's in the best interest of the animal.
02-01-2016 02:01 PM
ladyfey I had a similar experience just yesterday, TailFin. I applied back in December for a dog from a rescue site here in Maryland. It took me weeks to hear back from them, I finally had my phone interview on Jan. 4. I didn't hear back until I emailed them 2 weeks later, they said then that the dog had been getting treatment for an infection and had not been available for meets. So we finally went to meet her yesterday. The dog was on their website as cat friendly ( a must, we have cats) and dog friendly and 80 lbs. In reality, she is not dog friendly, has no experience with cats and is 100 lbs. The "infection" she was getting treated - cancer.
So much lying on the rescues part! I don't mind the weight difference, but everything else was a problem. We passed on the dog, it wouldn't be fair to the cats to bring her home. I had a similar experience with a rescue in California when I lived there. It's a shame that untrustworthy rescues are out there.
02-01-2016 01:53 PM
VeggieSince88 I would absolutely share your disgust, Eternal Sunshine. I can't stand hypocrites of any kind, but I'm particularly touchy when it comes to animals.

You might want to educate your sister about rescue groups for purebred dogs/cats. When I had dogs, I had Great Danes, my very favorite breed. If my health allowed having dogs now, I'd definitely get another Great Dane--from a rescue organization, like my favorite, Gentle Giants Rescue & Adoption. So if she MUST have a purebred dog or cat, there are plenty of them available for rescue/adoption, from local shelters to rescue groups, they're out there!
02-01-2016 11:13 AM
TailFin I'd like to add my own little 'rant' to this discussion. Sorry if it's long.

Little backstory: my family has had dogs for a long time. I've grown up with dogs and a multitude of other animals (e.g., birds, turtles, mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, cats). I know how to act around them, I know what they need, I know how to take care of them. I worked for a few months as a veterinary assistant, so I have a good rapport with the vet (one of the best in our area). I'm not saying I'm perfect, but I would consider myself a good pet owner. The wife was typically afraid of dogs growing up, but she got accustomed to my family's dogs, we then got a dog, and now we're on our second. She's a very good mom to our dog.

Now, to begin my rant, when the wife and I started looking for a dog, we immediately went to adopt. We needed a smaller dog due to various reasons, one being we like smaller dogs and two we had breed/size restrictions in our first place. So, we found a dog we thought was really cute, seemed to fit with our personality, and it was good for size restrictions. We asked about adopting and were given a twelve page application, asking for numerous references, vet references, and an essay. Wow, are you kidding? Well, we filled out the application. After a week, we didn't hear anything, so we checked with the adoption place. They flat out denied our request, because we didn't have a fenced yard. Mind you, our apartment complex had a fenced dog park, which was explicitly stated in the application. Nope, we were denied.

So, we had similar issues with other adoption places, where they would essentially refuse us, because we didn't have our own fenced yard. Well, we finally found a Norwich terrier (it was listed as a Cairn) that was found dumped off at some local park. The adoption place seemed nice enough, and didn't seem to mind that we didn't have a fenced yard. We adopted the dog the same day we went to see her. The lady gave some sob story about how the dog was returned after being adopted out previously, etc. Prior to adopting her, we were given the vet's report on her, and it mentioned a 'possible heart murmur'. Well, when we took her to our vet, he said that any first year biology student would have recognized it. Our vet said she had a grade 5 to 6 heart murmur and was pretty much in the middle of congestive heart failure. We asked how the other vet indicated it as a 'possible' heart murmur when it was obviously anything but. According to him, some adoption places put out 'faked' reports to get certain dogs (i.e., the ones that are costing them a lot) adopted at any cost to the new owners. Thelma got so bad after a few weeks, that she was winded just walking up and down the steps to go outside. I started carrying her up and down. We bought steps for her to get on the couch to sleep, since she couldn't jump up.

The wife and I didn't have the heart to return Thelma, as she was so sweet and settled in really well. Unfortunately for us, we had to shell out over a hundred dollars a month in prescriptions, and that didn't include the literally thousands of dollars we spent in taking her to the vet over the course of a year. Our first vet bill alone was over $600 due to having x-rays and a slew of other tests. Thelma passed away almost to the year after we adopted her. Despite all of this, we were glad we gave her a happy last year of her life and we didn't regret adopting her.

That said, within a week of adopting Thelma, we requested that the adoption place return our adoption fee of $250 due to what happened and what our vet indicated. I was greeted with a belligerent response indicating that they didn't have to return any money and that I should be ashamed for asking for the money back. Well, after a few awkward exchanges, we received our adoption fee.

Based on everything that happened to us, our opinion on adoption places has completely changed. Initially, we were happy to go dog-adoption hunting. Now, we don't want anything to do with adoption places. It's a shame that adoption places are going to actively refuse good people that are looking to adopt a dog. They are going to lie outright when trying to 'get rid of dogs' they don't want. The restrictions on trying to adopt a dog are so insanely hard, that we didn't want to go through that heartache, pain, and stress again. Applications that are pages and pages long, with essays? Nope. These places would rather us go to a breeder or even worse, when there's a dog in need right there. That's a shame. They should be ashamed. Until adoption places can change the way they act, we won't be visiting them in the foreseeable future.

This may not be the most popular opinion here, but... we went to a local breeder to get our current dog, and we're happy we did. Sorry, no regrets here.

We may attempt the adoption process in the future, but I'm not guaranteeing anything.
02-01-2016 07:51 AM
littestvegan I have the same beliefs that you do. While I found my Bailey on craigslist, she was a rescue. The lady worked for a shelter and she found Bailey and her siblings underneath a house. The pictures were clearly taken in a shelter and I called to make sure her story was right. I just wanted to clear that up incase someone wanted to call me out on it.
Best thing to do about your sister is ignore it, and her when it comes to this.
My sister and her husband spend $500-600 on a "purebreed american lab" right when they found out they were going to have a baby. When the dog was a puppy they loved it, when our older dog would snap at it my sisters husband would kick her. They would never pick up after her when walking her, and eventually she ended up spending her whole life in the cage until she was two, living in her own **** and piss because they never took her out for more than two seconds. Then they would yell and beat her. Eventually they put her up on craigslist for free and she went to a beautiful family who still sends pictures till this day of how happy and healthy she is.
I guess I needed to rant too.
02-01-2016 05:06 AM
Crouton Seriously! That's ridiculous. I don't get why people get so hung up on pure breeds. Almost every single pure breed will have serious health problems it's whole life, from generations of being inbred and bred to have specific visual traits that harm them physically. Yet if you adopt a mixed breed mutt from a pound, you will likely have a healthy dog for life, with very little problems and for a fraction of the cost, or no cost at all. I don't get people...
02-01-2016 04:37 AM
Eternal Sunshine Yes! My sister wanted a bulldog, which are also super unhealthy. I can't even count how many links I sent her for purebred bulldog puppies (American, English, and French) that were available locally through rescues and shelters. They were available for a fraction of the cost, and they came with the stupid pedigree papers she cares so much about but the breeder she bought from didn't provide. She's having the dog's DNA analyzed and wants a discount if it comes back anything less then purebred.
02-01-2016 12:12 AM
Crouton This is crazy because I have this EXACT same problem. My sister always says she knows how bad the dog breeding industry is, and how she would only adopt etc. She also know's how unhealthy most "designer" dog breeds are, and how we basically bred genetic mutations into them for money, at the detriment of their health. But whenever she talks about dogs she still always talks about how much she wants a pug or a miniature this or designer that. Dogs that you can't find at the pound, but have to buy from expensive "pure breed" breeders. Pugs are literally the most unhealthy dogs on the planet due to over breeding and greed, and she wants to support that.
01-31-2016 11:56 PM
Eternal Sunshine
Is it okay if I rant for a second?

I believe very strongly in adopting rather than buying pets, and in taking full responsibility for them even if it becomes inconvenient for you. I don't just believe in these things, but I actually practice them. My sister, on the other hand, is a giant hypocrite.

She is constantly posting "adopt don't shop" and "pets are furever" messages on social media. A few months ago she bought a puppy from a backyard breeder she found on Craigslist, and obtained two kittens the same way. She also just bought a designer dog for a disgusting amount of money from a breeder who claims this was his "practice breed to see how well she can produce." It made me sick, and it's even worse because when she found out she was pregnant three years ago she gave away all of her pets AND all of her husband's pets. I finally called her out on it, and she got incredibly b*tchy in response.

I just want to shake her. Practice what you preach! On the other hand, though, "adopt don't shop" and "pets are furever" are great messages, so I guess I'm glad she's sharing even if she is a big fat hypocrite.

Sorry for the rant. I just figured you guys might have a kind word to ease the frustration.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off