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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-29-2016 11:38 AM
TGreene Lewis,

It doesn't really matter completely if you've become "desensitized" at the sight of meat and whatnot. I think many people are simply because it is all around us from the day we are born, and many of us are told that it's "necessary" and "what we need to eat". Point is, somewhere in your brain you do have an opposition to how getting meat is done, and that is huge. I think you'd do very well as a vegan, even if you start as a vegetarian. It is making a step in the right direction for your health, your conscience, and animals/the environment. Every little thing each person does to lower their "footprint" on the destruction of the planet is a plus. And yes you can definitely get all of your nutrients to stay active. And don't be fooled, so many companies and people push that we need way more protein than we actually do (and in fact too much protien in your body if it isn't used it is turned to fat stores), and like other people said you can easily get your protein from plant sources. Just eat enough calories, and include healthy fats like olive oil, coconut oil, and avocados into your diet, and eat a diverse mix of foods so you don't get bored or deficient in anything. If you aren't sure if you are covering all your bases while you learn, it's easily fixed by taking a multivitamin (check the labels, many of them are vegan and they will say so). Some of my favorite staples low-salt blue corn tortilla chips and hummus, and I love the Boca brand burgers (they have vegetarian ones and vegan ones), there is a product called Veganaise that I use for mayo (funny I actually HATE regular mayonaise but love the Veganaise) it's in the dairy section of your store (go figure!), there are sooo many vegan dressings, butters, and the like to flavor your foods. And try all kinds of new spices!!! Spices make food not boring! Try curry and italian and all kinds of them. Also, beware of pasta (most pasta is made with eggs, but you can find it or make it yourself without the eggs) if you are going vegan.
I actually suggest looking at the thread on here the 30 Day Vegan Challenge. I did something similar a couple years ago and it was so much easier than I thought, and my body (and mind) thanked me for it. I should've just never quit it lol!! And honestly, I should've joined this forum then as well. It seems like you will find tons of support and people to help with ANY issue or question you may have!!

Good luck and keep us informed on how you are doing!!!!!!
01-23-2016 02:20 AM
Spudulika
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewis99 View Post
I know it sounds contradictory but believe me it is what I am thinking. No matter how I put it I can not find a reason that would morally justify killing an animal for the sake of someones palate, but seeing animals die (at least in a quick humane way, if you can even call it that) does not repulse me or evoke much of an emotional reaction. I have seen animals die when I was on a farm once and I just didn't get much of an emotional reaction from it. I imagine if I saw an animal tortured to death I would be repulsed (I'll have a look at some of the videos people have recommended I look at.). I do remember yesterday on the news I saw a report about dogs being eaten in Asia and how 70% of them were stolen, that repulsed me.

It is a very strange feeling and I'm not proud of it, I guess I just have a strong stomach, but it doesn't mean I think it is excusable. I guess it is desensitisation.
We all have differing degrees of tolerance for stimuli. That's fine and really neither here nor there. You've come to your conclusions via different route than some. It's simply following through that matters now.
01-22-2016 09:22 PM
Lewis99
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobJustBob View Post
Lewis:
You should use the search function on this discussion board to research whether you can maintain a vegan diet in the military--I suspect that may be harder to achieve.
I have a friend who is a vegan and going the army soon, might ask her.
01-22-2016 09:16 PM
Lewis99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegan Dave View Post
So, you don't "feel guilty", but you "know it's wrong"..... Hmmmmm.....

You are killing an innocent animal, so you can eat a hamburger.

.
I know it sounds contradictory but believe me it is what I am thinking. No matter how I put it I can not find a reason that would morally justify killing an animal for the sake of someones palate, but seeing animals die (at least in a quick humane way, if you can even call it that) does not repulse me or evoke much of an emotional reaction. I have seen animals die when I was on a farm once and I just didn't get much of an emotional reaction from it. I imagine if I saw an animal tortured to death I would be repulsed (I'll have a look at some of the videos people have recommended I look at.). I do remember yesterday on the news I saw a report about dogs being eaten in Asia and how 70% of them were stolen, that repulsed me.

It is a very strange feeling and I'm not proud of it, I guess I just have a strong stomach, but it doesn't mean I think it is excusable. I guess it is desensitisation.
01-22-2016 06:59 PM
Gita
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobJustBob View Post
Lewis:

I have a saying which describes in a nutshell my experience of adopting a whole-food, plant-based (WFPB, or vegan) diet: "I came for the health benefits, but stayed for the compassion." This means that I originally became interested in a vegan diet after studying the ideas of Drs. Joel Fuhrman, Dean Ornish, Caldwell Esselstyn, and John McDougall, all of whom present persuasive evidence that a WFPB diet is the optimum one for good health. A funny thing happened after I had been doing it for a while, though: it was as though I became a little less self-centered and started to appreciate the fact that it was leading to less suffering for animals, too. This made me feel even better about the decision.
I like what you have to say Bobjustbob. One thing leads to another.
01-22-2016 05:25 PM
BobJustBob
Quote:
The thing is though, when I do eat meat, I don't feel guilty about it. Logically I know it is wrong but it is as if subconscious my brain doesn't care. Was it like this for anyone else when they first started to become a vegetarian/vegan?
Lewis:

I have a saying which describes in a nutshell my experience of adopting a whole-food, plant-based (WFPB, or vegan) diet: "I came for the health benefits, but stayed for the compassion." This means that I originally became interested in a vegan diet after studying the ideas of Drs. Joel Fuhrman, Dean Ornish, Caldwell Esselstyn, and John McDougall, all of whom present persuasive evidence that a WFPB diet is the optimum one for good health. A funny thing happened after I had been doing it for a while, though: it was as though I became a little less self-centered and started to appreciate the fact that it was leading to less suffering for animals, too. This made me feel even better about the decision.

As the other posters have pointed out, there are many top athletes in a number of sports who are vegan, so with proper planning you should have no trouble maintaining the necessary energy level for your chosen activities. You should use the search function on this discussion board to research whether you can maintain a vegan diet in the military--I suspect that may be harder to achieve.
01-22-2016 05:14 PM
Necter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewis99 View Post
Hi all.

I'm an Australian, and meat has been part of my diet and culture since I was born, from Australia day bbq to Bunnings sausage sizzles. I am currently 16 and have been thinking about vegetarianism and veganism recently. I'm a smart kid and try to base my actions and morals around logic and I can't find any logical reason that would morally justify killing an animal for food. We are perfectly able to support ourselves without meat, I would understand killing an animal if you were say, lost in the woods or something, but in day to day life I can't find any logical reason to do it.

The thing is though, when I do eat meat, I don't feel guilty about it. Logically I know it is wrong but it is as if subconscious my brain doesn't care. Was it like this for anyone else when they first started to become a vegetarian/vegan?

Also, I like to lead an active lifestyle, I camp, hike and exercise in the mornings. I'm also thinking of joining the armed forces. Would having a vegetarian diet make it harder to maintain the required energy levels?

I would really appreciate any advice on this and how to get started and talking to my parents about it. It just seems like the logical thing to do.

My advice is continue to research factory farming, animal agriculture, the ethics of killing, the nature and function of slaughterhouses; the more you know, the more you will be repulsed by meat, dairy, and eggs. You may or may not wish to view graphic images of animal slaughter, I recommend you do.

Dairy cows are artificially inseminated. Eggs are a bird's menstrual cycle. These foods are *disgusting*, in my opinion.

I advise you ask yourself why participate in the needless slaughter of innocent animals.
01-22-2016 04:41 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegan Dave View Post
So, you don't "feel guilty", but you "know it's wrong"..... Hmmmmm.....

You are killing an innocent animal, so you can eat a hamburger.

Check out the videos at http://www.peta.org for an idea about what you have to decide about.

Be sure you are making the right decision.

The animals will thank you, and the scientific community says that a vegetarian diet is healthier.

Your move.

Lewis seems to be sincerely interested in learning about vegetarian diets.
01-22-2016 04:02 PM
Vegan Dave
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewis99 View Post
The thing is though, when I do eat meat, I don't feel guilty about it. Logically I know it is wrong but...
So, you don't "feel guilty", but you "know it's wrong"..... Hmmmmm.....

You are killing an innocent animal, so you can eat a hamburger.

Check out the videos at http://www.peta.org for an idea about what you have to decide about.

Be sure you are making the right decision.

The animals will thank you, and the scientific community says that a vegetarian diet is healthier.

Your move.
01-22-2016 11:38 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by myfitlittlefoodie View Post
Hello Lewis!

During your initial transition it doesn't hurt to get a blood test done just to ensure that your iron levels haven't taken a plunge. BUT eating foods like beans, lentils, and dark leafy greens can help with iron levels. Try pairing these foods with citrus foods because plant based iron (non heme iron) is better absorbed this way. Another note: tea inhibits iron absorption. It is without a doubt that the transition can be difficult, BUT this post can give you some tips to make the change a smooth one!

http://myfitlittlefoodie.com/2016/01...d-of-veganism/

As mylittlefoodie says, vegetarians and vegans should pay attention to getting enough iron. The Vegetarian Starter Guide that I provided above (http://www.mercyforanimals.org/files/VSG.pdf ) provides guidance on getting enough iron (see page 7).

Peer-reviewed nutrition studies have concluded that vegetarians / vegans are not more likely to have iron anemia, although they may have lower bodily iron stores. Please read these studies from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition:

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1233S.abstract

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/70/3/353.full.pdf+html


http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/76...d-2b5a58685117

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/89...d-2b5a58685117

01-22-2016 09:17 AM
myfitlittlefoodie Hello Lewis!

People go vegan/vegetarian for all sorts of reasons. For you, it may not be an ethical stand point (animal conscious), it be be somewhere along the lines of a health or environmentally friendly perspective. Personally I began my transition once I started getting educated about the added hormone levels in meat/animal products. In terms of staying active, it is all about monitoring your body's energy levels. During your initial transition it doesn't hurt to get a blood test done just to ensure that your iron levels haven't taken a plunge. BUT eating foods like beans, lentils, and dark leafy greens can help with iron levels. Try pairing these foods with citrus foods because plant based iron (non heme iron) is better absorbed this way. Another note: tea inhibits iron absorption. It is without a doubt that the transition can be difficult, BUT this post can give you some tips to make the change a smooth one!

http://myfitlittlefoodie.com/2016/01...d-of-veganism/
01-22-2016 09:15 AM
dormouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Definitely! There are a number of websites that feature vegetarian / vegan bodybuilders and athletes.

Dairy and eggs are good sources of protein, but dairy has zero iron. Even the currently popular, high-protein "Greek Yogurt" contains no iron: https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...gurt+nutrition

There are ethical considerations to be made regarding dairy and eggs as well - you can research this. I haven't consumed dairy or eggs in 24 years.
Thanks for the correction about the iron. And I certainly agree about the ethics of dairy and eggs. Eliminating meat is a great start, though, for the OP.
01-22-2016 09:06 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by dormouse View Post

There are lots of vegan athletes who thrive on a plant-based diet. I would suggest checking out Rich Roll, an ultra runner, and his podcast, where he interviews lots of vegan athletes and other cool vegan people. He's had on NASCAR drivers, endurance athletes, and all sorts of people. I know there is also a website out there devoted to vegan body building. And this is a vegan diet. It's even easier to get lots of protein and iron from a vegetarian diet that still includes dairy and eggs.
Definitely! There are a number of websites that feature vegetarian / vegan bodybuilders and athletes.

Dairy and eggs are good sources of protein, but dairy has zero iron. Even the currently popular, high-protein "Greek Yogurt" contains no iron: https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...gurt+nutrition

There are ethical considerations to be made regarding dairy and eggs as well - you can research this. I haven't consumed dairy or eggs in 24 years.
01-22-2016 09:00 AM
David3 Hi Lewis,

Check out this guy: Jan Muller, World Champion Muay Thai Fighter, and a vegan.

He became a vegetarian at age 14, and he grew to be 2 meters tall, 120 kg.

01-22-2016 08:54 AM
dormouse A lot of people don't make an emotional, visceral connection between, say, a ham sandwich and horrible cruelty. We are so used to seeing meat. It doesn't look like part of a dead body. It's all hidden and sanitized. You may find that you have stronger feelings if you watch some slaughterhouse videos. There are tons of these produced by a variety of organizations, like PETA or Mercy for Animals. Some of the best known ones are called "Meet Your Meat" and "Earthlings."

These videos are pretty disturbing. I have only watched bits and pieces. I by no means recommend watching them if you already feel committed to switching to vegetarianism. However, some people find that it solidifies their decision.

There are lots of vegan athletes who thrive on a plant-based diet. I would suggest checking out Rich Roll, an ultra runner, and his podcast, where he interviews lots of vegan athletes and other cool vegan people. He's had on NASCAR drivers, endurance athletes, and all sorts of people. I know there is also a website out there devoted to vegan body building. And this is a vegan diet. It's even easier to get lots of protein and iron from a vegetarian diet that still includes dairy and eggs.
01-22-2016 08:48 AM
David3 Hi Lewis,

Welcome aboard.

Being a vegetarian doesn't require you to feel any strong emotional reaction towards meat or slaughterhouses. It sounds like you are rationally aware that eating animals is unnecessary and violent.

Mercy For Animals has a very well-written Vegetarian Starter Guide (free to download): http://www.mercyforanimals.org/files/VSG.pdf . The nutrition part of the guide is on page 7, and easy meal ideas are shown on pages 11-13.

A vegetarian diet will fully support a physically-active lifestyle, as long as you focus on getting plenty of calories. Because vegetarian staple foods (beans, grains, fruit, vegetables) are low in calories, it's easy to accidentally underconsume calories. This is why vegetarian diets can be so effective for weight loss.

The easy way to get enough calories is to eat more nuts, seeds, and dried fruits. Nuts and seeds contain 700-1000 calories per cup, and dried fruits contain about 400-500 calories per cup. This is why "trail mix" contains nuts and raisins - plenty of calories to fuel your hiking and outdoor activities. It's healthier to choose trail mixes with no added oils or sugar (or better yet, just buy your own nuts and raisins and mix them together).


01-22-2016 01:47 AM
Lewis99
Current meat eater thinking about going vegetarian

Hi all.

I'm an Australian, and meat has been part of my diet and culture since I was born, from Australia day bbq to Bunnings sausage sizzles. I am currently 16 and have been thinking about vegetarianism and veganism recently. I'm a smart kid and try to base my actions and morals around logic and I can't find any logical reason that would morally justify killing an animal for food. We are perfectly able to support ourselves without meat, I would understand killing an animal if you were say, lost in the woods or something, but in day to day life I can't find any logical reason to do it.

The thing is though, when I do eat meat, I don't feel guilty about it. Logically I know it is wrong but it is as if subconscious my brain doesn't care. Was it like this for anyone else when they first started to become a vegetarian/vegan?

Also, I like to lead an active lifestyle, I camp, hike and exercise in the mornings. I'm also thinking of joining the armed forces. Would having a vegetarian diet make it harder to maintain the required energy levels?

I would really appreciate any advice on this and how to get started and talking to my parents about it. It just seems like the logical thing to do.

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