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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-23-2016 08:28 AM
Logan05
You have so many resources to help you succeed!

I went vegan after a Whole Foods opened near me and either ate there or Chipotle(Pre-sofritas) daily. I was still learning how to really read labels and pair foods. I was incredibly talented in the kitchen during my pre-veg days but the learning curve threw me until I found out how to get similar results with incredibly different ingredients.

Now there are incredible youtube channels and blogs online that have vids for "What I ate in a day", recipes for things that most of us keep in our pantry and eating out made easy. I have been going to local restaurants for years and am only now discovering that they have "secret" vegan menus that can be pulled out at a moment's notice. Save money by avoiding the boring salad on the menu and customizing your own fajita because many restaurants charge more for meat.

Here are some recipe websites that have great tips and stories as well.
Mary's Test Kitchen- Easy to make dishes without feeling like a science experiment.
http://www.marystestkitchen.com/

Hot For Food- A couple that strives to make vegan food that isn't boring.
http://www.hotforfoodblog.com/

The Vegan Zombie- Great meals prepared during a zombie apocalypse.
http://theveganzombie.com/

You can also search raw vegans, whole food vegans etc. There are often plant based cooking classes in different cities. I went vegan overnight and a friend later pointed out the fact that it was a few months before my birthday week(yeah, I like to drag it out) in New Orleans. All of the WF were pretty meat-centric there but I had some of the most incredible food there. Breads on Oak, Siberia, Killer Poboys and some others taught me to buy two of everything because the Omnis with me kept eating my food.
The happy cow app and Yelp have been a life saver!

There are so many possibilities if you look at everything differently. Learn a little bit of everything and you can Macguyver up something fantastic every(okay it is more like 60:40) time! I had a cold this week and didn't want soup. I felt like something with spices and eyed the garam masala and coriander. I thought a chana masala would be perfect but found that I didn't have any chickpeas and the local Indian restaurant wouldn't be open for the next few hours. I grabbed some dry lentils and then got to work. Not only was it faster but the spices permeated the lentils much more thoroughly.
01-09-2016 08:50 AM
dormouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowlips View Post
One of my favorite parts about being vegan has been experimenting with so many new healthy foods I haven't even thought of before. I think if you just try to have more fun with it instead of making it strictly only what you already know, you'll enjoy it much more.
Personally I look forward to my meals because it gives me a chance to be creative with the surprisingly large amount of vegan options. Try looking to new fruits/veggies you haven't tried yet, or google some vegan recipes and give those a try!
- It's also a good idea to stock up on some backup frozens or canned things for days that you don't have time to prepare a masterpiece. Don't give up! It's such a positive way to live and I really think you'll enjoy it more with minor adjustments!
I agree wholeheartedly. I started eating more variety each step I made toward veganism. It wasn't until I went vegetarian that I started exploring ethnic foods, such as Thai and Indian. Since going vegan, my diet has become even more diverse.
01-08-2016 11:16 PM
cowlips One of my favorite parts about being vegan has been experimenting with so many new healthy foods I haven't even thought of before. I think if you just try to have more fun with it instead of making it strictly only what you already know, you'll enjoy it much more.
Personally I look forward to my meals because it gives me a chance to be creative with the surprisingly large amount of vegan options. Try looking to new fruits/veggies you haven't tried yet, or google some vegan recipes and give those a try!
- It's also a good idea to stock up on some backup frozens or canned things for days that you don't have time to prepare a masterpiece. Don't give up! It's such a positive way to live and I really think you'll enjoy it more with minor adjustments!
01-08-2016 04:39 PM
Sadrielle
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom View Post
Hi, ZebraStripes, and welcome!

I also find I have a tendency to fall into "diet ruts" where I wind up eating a lot of the same foods. What I eat isn't unhealthy or untasty; for some reason I need to prod myself occasionally to get more variety. And the strange thing is, this shouldn't be hard- because when you think about it, most people don't eat very many different kinds of meat, but there are lots if different kinds of grains, beans, nuts/seeds... and even more different kinds of vegetables, fruits, and spices/herbs to eat with them.
I think that's a profound observation. Cutting out animal products cuts very little in the grand scheme.

Variety is the spice of life. Either be vegan or don't, it's a personal choice. Unless you're experiencing a medical issue such as explosive diarrhea, stomach cramps, excessive gas or withdrawal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, there's no purpose to a slow transition other than using up what's in your pantry and fridge that's not going to be acceptable on your new eating plan. Yogurt, eggs, milk, left over meats, etc. that are already purchased and the consumption thereof already financially accounted for in someone's bank account. Going out and purchasing more seems like a self-excusing justification to eat things you're jonesing for even if with the mindset that it's going to be temporary.

Go watch some youtube recipes and ideas. Do some homework. I promise you the list of things you can make with vegan ingredients is ever endless and accounts for every taste you could want to have pressed onto your tongue.
01-08-2016 03:06 PM
Vegan Dave
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce V View Post
Yes, you should quit "trying" to be vegan and just be vegan.
Yup.

Examine WHY you want to be vegan.

If it's a good reason that you can live with....you're set.

If there's some ambiguity, figure it out, and move forward.

Either way.....make a decision.
01-08-2016 02:35 PM
Tom Hi, ZebraStripes, and welcome!

I also find I have a tendency to fall into "diet ruts" where I wind up eating a lot of the same foods. What I eat isn't unhealthy or untasty; for some reason I need to prod myself occasionally to get more variety. And the strange thing is, this shouldn't be hard- because when you think about it, most people don't eat very many different kinds of meat, but there are lots if different kinds of grains, beans, nuts/seeds... and even more different kinds of vegetables, fruits, and spices/herbs to eat with them.
01-08-2016 01:21 PM
dormouse It sounds like the problem isn't veganism but a lack of variety in your diet. There are hundreds of amazing vegan blog and shelves of cookbooks to explore at your local bookstore. Maybe commit yourself to trying 1 or 2 new recipes per week. I bet you'll find some great new things to add to your rotation.
01-04-2016 12:22 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessarachne View Post
Potato (Not a source of anything useful, but filling)

Surprisingly, even white potatoes are nutritious. A medium (2-1/4" to 3-1/4" diameter) potato contains 70% RDI of vitamin C, 30% RDI of vitamin B-6, and 25% RDI of potassium: https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=potato+nutrition
01-03-2016 07:45 PM
princessarachne
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZebraStripes View Post
So I would say since November I have been transitioning to veganism. Now it is January and I feel like I have tried to make the transition too fast. I started getting tired of eating the same foods (because I never really learned new recipes) and it has made me want to stop eating. Should I back track and go back from the beginning of when I started transitioning or should I just stop entirely? I just don't know what to do right now.
Step 1: Take a deep freaking breath and stop panicking.
This is my strategy, which I have called "the rainbow method" The idea is that you try to eat at least four of the colors of a rainbow each day (one of which MUST be green) + 2 protein sources + 200 cal of fat.


So, for example:

Scrambled tofu with bell pepper (Protein 1, Red)

Salad with cashews(Greens)

Carrots (orange)
Cauliflower (Yellow) (Considered yellow for simplicity)
Potato (Not a source of anything useful, but filling)
Garbanzo beans (Protein 2)

This gives you structure and variety, and will keep you out of a "rut". Never eat the exact same meal more than 3x per week (Unless it's leftovers).

Lastly, learn to improvise. It is important that you have the skill of cooking by just grabbing random foods and making it work. You will find that what seems like weird food combination actually tastes really good (Sauteéd Onions and peanut butter are AWESOME together)

Lastly, ignore any silly dietary restriction advice because this will make it worse. Unless you have a good reason (like cilliac disease) to avoid a particular food, don't avoid it. If you are thinking of "detoxing" or trying some sort of fad diet, stop. Just eat food that confers a substantial amount of nutritional value. It's that simple.

Funny anecdote: I once knew someone who was in this alternative medicine program thing, and her "doctor" told her to only eat foods that were the same shape as her head, and to eat those foods in a specific order that had something to do with numerology. She also recommended that my friend eat raw coffee grounds twice a day to clear out "toxins". This was, of course, combined with none other than homeopathy. Oh, you alternative medicine "doctors" make me laugh! (And cry, on occasion)
01-03-2016 06:22 PM
David3 HI ZebraStripes,

I would relax and not stress about the whole thing.

I definitely think that veganism is worthwhile, and it sounds like you feel the same way (otherwise, you wouldn't have begun your vegan journey). You don't have to do it overnight, though. It's much easier to become vegan if you first find 5 or 6 vegan dishes that really fill you up and satisfy you. These dishes might be vegan versions of your favorite foods (veggie-patty burgers, meatless hot dogs, burritos, spaghetti, soup, etc.). Once you have these new favorite vegan dishes, it won't be such a big deal to leave behind your old favorite meat dishes.

Mercy For Animals has a beautiful, easy-to-use Vegetarian Starter Guide (it's actually vegan). On pages 11-13, it has extremely simple, fully-illustrated meal ideas: http://www.mercyforanimals.org/files/VSG.pdf

I've been vegan for 24 years, but I became a vegan in 2 stages: 6 months as a vegetarian (with some dairy foods and eggs), then transitioning to full vegan.
01-03-2016 05:28 PM
jessandreia Neither.
You have figured out what the problem is - not learning new recipes. That's easy to solve. Google vegan recipes, and try some you think you'll like.
01-03-2016 05:24 PM
Bruce V Yes, you should quit "trying" to be vegan and just be vegan.
01-03-2016 05:10 PM
Poppy Get a copy of VegNews - www.vegnews.com. It's full of advertisements for vegan products, recipes, vegan travel ideas and news articles. Then - start cooking! Experiment as much as you can and try new products. It's a whole new way of life, and one that I have found to be abundant and fascinating - but you can't stay in a rut.

What kinds of foods do you like?
01-03-2016 05:06 PM
ZebraStripes
Should I quit trying to be vegan?

So I would say since November I have been transitioning to veganism. Now it is January and I feel like I have tried to make the transition too fast. I started getting tired of eating the same foods (because I never really learned new recipes) and it has made me want to stop eating. Should I back track and go back from the beginning of when I started transitioning or should I just stop entirely? I just don't know what to do right now.

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