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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-26-2015 10:24 AM
busyvegetarians
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
Very self explanatory image
10-16-2015 12:15 PM
Sadrielle I feel a little silly slipping this in here after David3's parenting of the thread (eheheh), because it's not study based advice and from one of the mentioned youtube lectures. However, the above picture that LedBoots put up is a concept from the Forks over Knives book/lecture that can be found on youtube. The author of Forks Over Knives surmises, essentially, that if you eat "concentrated" foods (i.e., nuts, fats, and refined foods), which is to say a dense caloric value for the volume of said food, that it's easier to feel hungry quickly after than it is if you eat foods that are less concentrated, or rather, foods with a lot of volume but less caloric value.

There are two factors that determine satiety, how stretched your stomach is and how much fat content you've eaten. Getting the balance between these two factors has been long debated, and is the source of a variety diets, including the popular 80/10/10 (80% calories from carbs /10% calories from protein /10% calories from fat) of several popular vegans, and Atkins's controversial 10/30/60 (10% calories from carbs/ 30% calories from protein /60% calories from fat). BOTH programs work for weight loss, and both can be done being completely vegan, it all comes down to personal preference and finding what you can stick with long term.
10-16-2015 11:33 AM
LedBoots
10-16-2015 11:30 AM
MadamSarcastra Fret not.... You WILL acclimate. My first month I couldn't believe how hungry I was all time. I make a point to always have some unsalted nuts handy, just in case. ;-) Good luck, hon! It's only gonna get better, trust me. My one-year veggieversary was two days ago.... honestly, I feel better than I have in years! Not so coincidentally, I haven't had a NAP in a year either... nor felt like I needed one. Don't worry, you're gonna be great. =)
10-16-2015 10:58 AM
Dalia73 How many calories are you eating? For a male over 6 feet tall, just glancing at your menu... Dinner in particular...it looks too low calorie, even if weight loss is your goal. I don't agree with the poster who suggested less fat. You don't seem to be eating ridiculous amounts of fat, and some fat is good both for satiety (feeling of fullness) and for aiding the body in absorbing nutrients. You just want to make sure that your fats are natural fats and the more filling, the better...like avocado vs mayo on a sandwich. At a glance, it looks like you could use a bit more protein. Maybe add a grain to your dinner also (like some rice).
09-28-2015 11:06 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marjoram View Post
How is it not accurate to tell someone he should eat a bit more if they are still hungry? to give them suggestions on healthy things he can add to his cereals etc?

On this page, I see conflicting advice regarding the consumption of starchy foods for those with diabetes. One person says that diabetics must limit starchy foods. Another person says that diabetics should eat starchy foods. These people can't both be correct, can they? This is not a matter of opinion; nutrition is a science, not an opinion piece. Let's see some cited references that address this topic, from reputable health organizations.
09-28-2015 10:07 AM
Marjoram How is it not accurate to tell someone he should eat a bit more if they are still hungry? to give them suggestions on healthy things he can add to his cereals etc?
09-28-2015 07:27 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marjoram View Post
Read again the answers, I see many who give serious answers without any need of citations.


Is "serious" the same thing as "accurate"?
09-28-2015 07:15 AM
Marjoram
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
The original poster has asked a serious question, and all I see are "answers" based on half-remembered YouTube videos.


Please provide citations to back up your answers, either from a reputable health organization or from peer-reviewed nutrition journals.
Read again the answers, I see many who give serious answers without any need of citations.
09-27-2015 04:15 PM
David3 The original poster has asked a serious question, and all I see are "answers" based on half-remembered YouTube videos.


Please provide citations to back up your answers, either from a reputable health organization or from peer-reviewed nutrition journals.
09-27-2015 09:14 AM
Gita
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieSince88 View Post
I respectfully disagree. Eating too much starch is not good for anyone, and it's particularly bad for people with certain ailments, such as diabetes. Also, the body cannot function at its best without some fat in the diet; the brain, especially, really needs fat in order to work at its best. Using olive oil, or another oil that has 'good' fat in it, can provide the body with what it needs in terms of fat, but they're high in calories. Just because we're not consuming animal-based products doesn't mean we can completely ignore calories or other nutritional issues, such as too much starch or too little fat.
Well, I totally disagree. Respectfully also.

Dr. Mcdougall has his type 2 diabetics patients totally off their medication eating a high starch diet.

The brain's main food is glycogen which is made by the human body, not by the introduction of foreign oils that are not natural to the human body.

Olive oil is unnatural, as is any oil. There are no trees that gave oil, you must take thousands of pieces of fruit and place them in an industrial machine to get such plentiful and refined oils. Granted, many people in the past had olive oil because olives are very oily, but it was treated with respect and very expensive.

Potatoes in particular are a resistant starch. Resistant starches lower insulin resistance. The flora in the gut out-number human body cells 10 to 1. Their main food is long chain starches (resistant starch). By feeding the gut flora, the long chain starches break down into short chains and create butyrate. Butyrate is the preferred food of the cells that line the colen. These reduce inflammation, reduce colorectal cancer, and those cells not used go into the blood stream, liver and other areas of the body. Resistant starches lower blood sugars. They not only fill you up when you are eating them, but they cause insulin sensitivity, the thing that got those with Diabetes into the doctors office in the first place. Insulin resistance is not just about diabetes, it is also about obesity, heart disease and other diseases of the West. These diseases began in epidemic form after the Nixon era when his agriculture Tsar, Earl Buttes turned farming into meat agriculture.

The majority of the traditional Asian diets are pure starch, and they are slim, healthy people when they do not eat meat. It is not the veggies, it is the starch. Potatoes and white rice are the center of many successful diets. The Rice (university) diet centers on white rice and fruit. In primitive societies which have not succumbed to the SAD diet (mainly lots of meat and oil) the people are slim and do not need to diet. They eat as much starch as they want. They have no noticeable rates of heart disease, diabetes, colo-rectal cancer, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, arthritis. They eat simple bean and corn, rice, or potato diets where the majority of their diet comes from those starch sources. That, in fact, was what vegetarianism was about until the Low Carb craze began. Now, we have vegetarians with the same sort of nonsense diseases as the omnivores. These diseases are linked to Low Carb Dieting and meat, animal and vegetable oils (etc.)

In addition, starch is broken down into glucose, which is the main food for all the cells in the body (not Keytones). Starch is your body's main source of energy. This includes the brain. Many nutritionists recommend that starch be your MAIN source of food throughout the day. Starch that is not used right away is broken down into glycogen, where it is stored as a 3 day supply in the liver. (Fat and protein, on the other hand are stored in your fat cells).

Meat, dairy, animal fats and vegetable oils lead to disease and obesity (obesity is a symptom of disease).

Oh well, that is my "reason." I am sure you have something equally interesting to say.
09-24-2015 01:01 PM
VeggieSince88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gita View Post
So, you see, I eat Large. Beans, potatoes and rice are very heavy and filling. These are the bedrock of my diet. I can easily skip a meal here and there and not feel hungry. Without oil or meat, or cheese, or eggs, (or cake and sugar) a person can eat a lot and not worry that much about calories. If you eat only beans and potatoes, and rice you can eat your fill and not worry about counting calories. It is only when you start adding food that is animal based or bad for you that calorie counting is needed.
I respectfully disagree. Eating too much starch is not good for anyone, and it's particularly bad for people with certain ailments, such as diabetes. Also, the body cannot function at its best without some fat in the diet; the brain, especially, really needs fat in order to work at its best. Using olive oil, or another oil that has 'good' fat in it, can provide the body with what it needs in terms of fat, but they're high in calories. Just because we're not consuming animal-based products doesn't mean we can completely ignore calories or other nutritional issues, such as too much starch or too little fat.
09-24-2015 05:56 AM
Gita I am from a school that says that calorie dense starches, or carbohydrates should be the bulk of your diet. When you do not eat fat or refined sugars, then you should not need to look at calories.

An example of my day's food might give you an idea.

Breakfast:
2 large red potatoes microwaved & cut up
about 1/2 cup of heated black beans (made from dry)
a large tablespoon of salsa. This does come from a jar.

Lunch.
cup of black beans and 2 bananas

Snack. One apple

(You will notice I have eaten no fat yet)

Dinner:
Rice bowl made of Jasmine rice, onions, veggies, some tofu strips onions, salsa.
A large salad (lettuce, kale, zucchini, tomato, onion, a few chopped almonds, with some coconut oil, and balsamic vinegar as dressing.

For drinks, a few coffees in the AM, and herbal tea or water throughout the day. I am careful with oil. I added a bit of medium chain triglycerides to my diet today.


So, you see, I eat Large. Beans, potatoes and rice are very heavy and filling. These are the bedrock of my diet. I can easily skip a meal here and there and not feel hungry. Without oil or meat, or cheese, or eggs, (or cake and sugar) a person can eat a lot and not worry that much about calories. If you eat only beans and potatoes, and rice you can eat your fill and not worry about counting calories. It is only when you start adding food that is animal based or bad for you that calorie counting is needed.
09-23-2015 01:11 PM
Berry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docbanana View Post
I would suggest that you track your calories and nutrition for a while to get good data on your caloric intake and intake of major nutrients of concern to vegetarians/vegans (like protein, iron, calcium). I use myfitnesspal.com for that.
I'd suggest that, too. Slowly lower the calories, so your appetite can adjust (and it will).

Plus: Nuts are very high in calories (though healthy). So I suggest you weigth them to know how much you eat. A hand full can easily be like 700 kcal.
09-18-2015 06:58 AM
Marjoram @Lachlan With your Wheetbix I would add to your bowl some fruits, like a sliced banana or blueberries or dried cranberries or figs. Or simply have a green tofu smoothie to go with your cereals for more proteins that will keep you full for hours. Your lunch is fine for a petite 5'2 woman like me so maybe some coleslaw or steamed veggies on the side to fill you up? Your dinner is too small, add quinoa to it and squash or a baked potato, wholegrain pasta.
09-17-2015 04:10 PM
Docbanana I would suggest that you track your calories and nutrition for a while to get good data on your caloric intake and intake of major nutrients of concern to vegetarians/vegans (like protein, iron, calcium). I use myfitnesspal.com for that.
09-17-2015 03:39 PM
Lachlan Thank you very much for your reply. I appreciate the time you took to write it out. Will try and implement some of these into my diet and see how I go.
09-14-2015 01:02 AM
RiggerBoots Good Morning,
I'm no expert so take what I say as pointers or as alternative thoughts rather than as sound fact.

You seem to be indicating that fat loss is a goal of yours yet full cream milk x2, eggs x2, yoghurt x2 won't help you get there I would imagine.
You're hungry and if you are eating healthily and veg/vegan it's easy to think you are overeating when in fact you are struggling to get your calories - man made junk is dense, nature is dilute - think of being veg as being a guy drinking low alcohol beer trying to get as drunk as a guy on vodka.
Your dinner wouldn't be enough for me as a 5'10", 11 stones man and no word of a lie I don't do anything physical and bare min movement.

I'd suggest changing your wheetabix to a good muesli i.e. one that has nuts/seeds/fruit in it but no added sugar. Replace the milk with skimmed milk or soy/almond etc etc.
Eat more fruit with the nuts or just eat a wad of fruit.
Is your bread white/refined? Get wholewheat or as close to it as you can, perhaps poach the eggs instead of frying? Add a salad to this lunch.
Is the yoghurt a low fat variety that compensates with half a bag of sugar? Is it high fat and sugar? Labels lie so make sure you don't take them at face value, I don't think a yoghurt has ever satisfied my hunger - consider fruit again but this time different from earlier.
Dinner - double the amounts of all bar the sauce, eat till you are stuffed.
If you're hungry after dinner consider porridge made in water, peanut butter (pure peanut butter with no added sugar/oil) on wholemeal toast with cinnamon/banana/ground flaxseed.

Throughout the day drink water, green tea, matcha tea, coffee, hibiscus.

You are just starting out so it's a learning curve at this point but remember that being veg/vegan is about eating predominantly fruit/veg and anything else that's edible and not from an animal. It's not about starving yourself and surviving on a little of an animal. As a veg you can obviously have full fat milk, cheese, eggs etc but these are dense meaning you'll hang on to the fat/calories they bring you but they won't expand your stomach so you don't feel hungry. Try get more veg/fruit into you to begin with and refine it as you go along - a salad isn't going to make you fat unless you coat it in oil and butter.

Hopefully this is of some use to you.
09-13-2015 09:29 PM
Lachlan
New Vegetarian always hungry with questions about diet

Hey guys,

I’m new to being a vegetarian, have been doing it for a about a week and I am nearly always quite hungry. With that said, I have only added the eggs into my diet in the last two days so maybe this added protein will help me out. I’m also thinking about adding avocado to my sandwhich at lunch to get extra fat and protein. I’m just wondering if you guys could have a look at my diet and suggest improvements. I am a 24 year old male, 6ft 2 and currently 84 kg, though I usually sit around 81-82 kilos when I am eating my normal diet that involved regular meat for lunch on a sandwich and then again for dinner but I have just gotten back from a 6 week eating binge in Melbourne so have put on weight. My ideal weight would be about 79 kg, as at 82 kilograms I am not overweight but certainly have a little excess pudge I’d love to reduce a little. I also excersize each day with a vigorous ten minute run (so nothing to extreme) and I swim 2km about once or twice a week. So, I guess my main concern is that I want to be eating enough food for a man of my size, weight, age and relative excersize expenditure and to not be feeling so hungry all the time, while also making sure I’m not overeating or replacing meat with carbs or cheese or something.


7:15 am Breakfast: Bowl of wheetbix (4 wheet biscuits) with full-cream milk.

9:00 am Pre-lunch snack: a handful of almonds or pistachios with an apple

11:00 am Lunch two slices of bread. On each slice I put mustard sliced up olives, capsicum four sundried tomatoes, and a fried egg (so two eggs total spread over the two slices of bread) and tomato sauce.

2:00 am Pre dinner snack: bowl of yoghurt and a carrot

5:00 pm Dinner: Half a can of red kidney beans (200g worth), sliced up broccoli, half a red onion, capcicum, and pasta sauce.

(at this point afterwards I am often eating another three wheetbix at like 7 or 8 and sometimes even another bowl of yogurt on top of this as I am hungry again and find that without the carbs I can’t satiate my self).

Any help would be dope! Thanks ☺

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