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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-10-2015 03:53 PM
hippypiggie
ethical cheese

Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthling View Post
I know of this company: <a href="http://www.ahimsamilk.org/" target="_blank">http://www.ahimsamilk.org/</a>. Their herd of milking cows is slaughter free, and the calves of those cows (male or female) are also guaranteed not to be slaughtered. At the moment, there are non-protected cows on the same farm who are still going for slaughter - although the milk from them is NOT being sold by the Ahimsa company - and the calves of the calves of the protected cows are not protected. I know they want to change all that but are doing it gradually because of financial constraints.<br><br>
They're not producing cheese at the moment but probably will be by the summer when they get a full time dairy person. You can get milk from them if you're in the right areas, and ghee, although most English people do not use ghee.<br><br>
I can vouch that the above is true.<br><br>
I work at a farm with much higher standards - no slaughter for anyone ever, calves drink from their mums, no concentrated feeds and so on. At the moment we're not able to sell anything to the public though, until we sort all the paperwork out with environmental health.<br><br>
All supermarket cheese is from cows who will be slaughtered before they're 5, and their male children slaughtered usually before 6 months. It's extremely hard to call it ethical, even if it's better than some other farms. And yes, organic cows can be given as many antibiotics as they need when they have mastitis and so on. The can even be given preventative treatments like worming as a matter of routine.
Hi, I'm guessing that the farm you work on is now able to sell to the public? Is it still as ethical as you say and if so how can I buy cheese from you? (I don't drink cow's milk).
Thanks!
Deb
03-15-2012 04:24 PM
yally I was thinking the same about cheese not being a big deal reading this thread. Actually cheese sounds pretty gross to me now.

I'll still eat fake cheese products, but I've forgotten why cheese is so hard for people to give up.

I'm not vegan, I just don't remember what was so good about cheese even though I used to eat butt loads of it. I'd melt in the microwave and eat it with a spoon. Grim.
03-15-2012 10:28 AM
Hamry My advice for you is to give up looking for ethical dairy. You're not going to find it because it doesn't exist. No matter how much money you spend or where you source the dairy from, you're still contributing to and creating demand for the exploitation of animals. These animals should not even be bred and domesticated in the first place, they only exist for our selfish wants. Spending lots of money on ahimsa products is unrealistic and seems like a lot of pointless effort when you could just give the stuff up. Honestly, it's just cheese. It seems so ridiculous to me. Even if these 'ethical' cheeses became popular and people decided to pay more for less and cut down on their dairy consumption, the act of eating these products is still fueling the mindset that we have the right to enslave and steal from animals. It is that mindset that has put cows in the situation they're in now and I personally do not want any part in that and cannot promote any other option than just giving the stuff up.

I recommend keeping off all cheese, dairy and vegan for around 6 months before you try the soy cheese again. If you go from dairy straight to soya you're probably not going to like it because it is not going to taste the same. It took me a while to get used to vegan cheese but I quite like it now.

Sorry if I sound like an arse, but having been vegan for nearly 5 years (I was a cheese addict before then) I can only roll my eyes at people who seem so reluctant to let cheese go. It's not a big deal.
03-14-2012 02:25 PM
twixygirl Thanks

I think that dairy, meat and eggs are overeaten , the way my nana talks about these goods is that they are a total luxury and I think they should stay that way she was a war baby and still lives mainly on a diet similar to what she grew up on during rationing. Id pay more and eat less making it cost the same :-) I found an online supplier of vegan cheeses so I might try tofutti and redwood but the tesco one makes me feel a bit like ugh they will all be like that! If the animal lives a good life and is treated well I dont have a problem with consuming milk and eggs.
03-14-2012 02:09 PM
Earthling That's something I forgot to mention, these products are a lot more expensive than standard ones. I mean, when you care for a cow for 18 years instead of 5, your food costs alone treble. Ahimsa milk is about twice the price of standard organic, ours is 50% more than Ahimsa. I think it's good because it means people realise the true value of dairy, and have to cut down on their dairy consumption if they switch to ethical products. Win for everyone.

If enough people register interest from near you, they will get a supply point. It just has to make financial sense for them. I hope they come near you soon!
03-14-2012 01:46 PM
twixygirl Thanks :-) I shall check that link out and I dont mind paying more I mean £5 a block would be fine with me, if your farm goes into business let me know.

I still will buy that cheese in the link over my previous cheese (tesco normal) as its a better choice, its not a perfect choice and I wont argue it is, but its a better choice. I am drastically cutting the amount of dairy I eat due to health too, it causes me issues to eat a lot, but cheese is my favourite food I am planning on moving to veganism (well id not call myself vegan as thats a label that I feel would be too hard to live up to , but a vegetarian who doesnt eat any dairy and only eats eggs she has "grown" herself sounds much more reasonable for me to live up to)

I am planning to try no moo and redwood cheese , but tesco free from vegan cheese is the worst thing I have ever tasted.

edit: I have registered interest with that dariy thanks for that ! I am right at the other end of the country though!
03-14-2012 01:22 PM
Earthling I know of this company: http://www.ahimsamilk.org/. Their herd of milking cows is slaughter free, and the calves of those cows (male or female) are also guaranteed not to be slaughtered. At the moment, there are non-protected cows on the same farm who are still going for slaughter - although the milk from them is NOT being sold by the Ahimsa company - and the calves of the calves of the protected cows are not protected. I know they want to change all that but are doing it gradually because of financial constraints.

They're not producing cheese at the moment but probably will be by the summer when they get a full time dairy person. You can get milk from them if you're in the right areas, and ghee, although most English people do not use ghee.

I can vouch that the above is true.

I work at a farm with much higher standards - no slaughter for anyone ever, calves drink from their mums, no concentrated feeds and so on. At the moment we're not able to sell anything to the public though, until we sort all the paperwork out with environmental health.

All supermarket cheese is from cows who will be slaughtered before they're 5, and their male children slaughtered usually before 6 months. It's extremely hard to call it ethical, even if it's better than some other farms. And yes, organic cows can be given as many antibiotics as they need when they have mastitis and so on. The can even be given preventative treatments like worming as a matter of routine.
03-14-2012 03:58 AM
.Goth-Alice. I am from the UK...
If you are willing to take their word on it then its sounds like you have your answer. Short of going and checking up on every company you can never be sure. Maybe some people on here can offer information that can help you.

There have been a few reports about farms that were meant to be RSPCA approved but were treating the animals terribly. Companies lie. Its just they way it is.
03-14-2012 03:47 AM
twixygirl In the UK organic animals can be given antibiotics to treat illness and they can be called organic once they have gone through a withdrawal period after the end of the antibiotics. I will confirm this with the cheese manufacturer to check this is what they practice and report back.
03-14-2012 03:26 AM
.Goth-Alice. Well for starters Organic means that the cows who supply the milk are only ever given the bare minium of drugs...so say a cow gets an infected udder...they cant call that cow organic if they pump it full of antibiotics, so its unlikely it will get the treatment it needs.

Organic does not mean more ethical. Same goes for Eggs, milk and well anything that comes from an Animal that has the word organic stamped on it im afraid.
03-14-2012 03:23 AM
twixygirl Tesco Organic Mature Cheddar 240G
It says on the packet that it is suitable for vegetarians
http://www.tesco.com/groceries/Produ.../?id=264863484

The cheese is handmade by Belton Family Farm in Shropshire.

heres some info on how the cows are treated:

"Weather permitting, cows are turned out to grass in April and will stay out as long as possible, usually until November when it becomes too wet and cold for them to remain outside. They are looked after very carefully and frequently checked to ensure the care they receive is up to high welfare standards enabling Belton Farm to use the Assured Food Standards Red Tractor symbol.

During the winter cows are fed a ration consisting of grass silage, forage maize, chopped straw and wholecrop wheat, all of which are grown on the farm. Extra feed will also be brought in to help balance out their diet including brewers grains, rape meal, molasses and minerals.

The cows are normally milked twice a day through modern milking parlours. Each cow receives the correct amount of feed depending on what stage she is at in her lactation.

A vacuum pump helps stimulate the cow to release milk which is drawn from her udder through four teat clusters, sent through a pipeline to a refrigerated bulk tank where the milk is cooled down to below 5 degrees C then tested by the laboratory, before being pumped into one of the milk storage silos."

This is not to be turned into a thread saying all vege should turn vegan please. I am trying to find the most ethical forms of these products and this cheese is the best one I have found so far , organic grass grazed cows this is far better than intensive corn/grain fed cows IMHO and I feel happier with this choice. For eggs I use organic/free range eggs too as this is I feel a more ethical choice again.

I am open to becoming vegan but I want to learn enough about nutrition to gradually move over in several years time. Until then I want to try to be the most ethical possible.

Has anyone got any other products that seem more ethical choices please?

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