Vegan sources of choline? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 02-25-2010, 02:23 AM
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Seems choline is essential nutritient - discounting choline from diet lead to strong deficiency symptoms (in past choline was considered as non-essential).



Daily req is around 500 mg, it's barely possible on vegan diet - unless it's composed with only high-choline products, such as lentils. Probably would be easier on raw-food diet, as vegetables are good source of choline - but you must east TONS of them to get 500mg (and seems monkeys in nature get choline this way). On "normal" vegan diet, with lots of grains, and only few calories coming from fresh vegetables, getting 500mg of choline might be tricky.



So... any hints?
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#2 Old 02-25-2010, 05:06 AM
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Wikipedia says soya and wheat germ (found in whole grain products) have lots.

I no longer post here after the disagreements and exodus related to the sale of VB back in 2012. (See my profile page.) 
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#3 Old 02-25-2010, 06:35 AM
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Wikipedia is wrong, as usual. 100 gram of pure wheat germ contain only 150 mg of choline - sure, eating 200 grams of germ daily is solution, but in normal whole grain diet you don't have even 20 gram.



Soybeans - sure, but just as above, you need to eat ONLY soy to get 500 mg of choline from it.



I can't find how much choline is in hemp seeds, lots of websites pointing at them as good source.



//edit



as i mentioned in first post, on raw food diet it would be easier - i.e. cucumber (I'm eating it right now) got like 1000 mg of choline / 2000 kcal, so - with 1000kcal cucumbers you got it. Drawback - 1000kcal of cucumbers is like 7 kg :P



For other plants it's much better, but still average vegan need awfully high amounts of greens to get 500mg.
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#4 Old 02-25-2010, 08:53 AM
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Why not eat less grains and more fruits and vegetables?
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#5 Old 02-25-2010, 09:27 AM
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Sometimes I feel like the only veg*n that doesn't worry about random nutritional crap like this.



I can say I've probably been choline-deficient my whole life (judging on the supposed daily intake requirements) and I've never experienced any severe symptoms, or had any chronic health problems whatsoever.



Seems like judging on the high amount of required choline per day versus the small amounts of choline present in food, almost everyone would be considered choline-deficient.



Just eat a healthy, balanced diet. Ya'll be fine.
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#6 Old 02-25-2010, 09:37 AM
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Just eat a healthy, balanced diet. Ya'll be fine.



Exercise, rest, play time (whatever 1!! ), and sunshine as well are on our script.
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#7 Old 02-25-2010, 09:49 AM
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Exercise, rest, play time (whatever 1!! ), and sunshine as well are on our script.



Hey, with a little common sense, ya can't go wrong!



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#8 Old 02-25-2010, 12:10 PM
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Statistically, average vegan live shorter than average omnivore. Sounds strange, but there is good explanation - most vegans doesn't care about "random nutritiondal crap". Choline deficiency might be one of reasons why vegans are plagued by heart attacks (besides well known ones, B12 and omega 3 deficiency). If it can be fixed with vegan supplements (why not buy B12 + Choline instead of only B12?), let's talk about it.



I'm vegan runner, so increasing body efficiency even by 1% is VERY important to me. This 1% can be difference between running first and finishing at 4th place. As I'm running with vegan shirt on, winning race is good promotion of veganism - who cares about 4th guy? And yes - I'm racing only to promote vegan diet So, excuse me, but I do care about nutrition, even at the edge of paranoia. At least posting at board doesn't cost me anything. Choline is important for runners, as it take part in burning fats, muscle building, liver functions and so on...



Back to topic - yes, I know, eating tons of fruits and vegetables is solution. But - it's very expensive, and not everyone got money to buy tons of greenies (especially when you live in very poor country, like I do), and in the middle of winter vegetables are usually very contaminated. No idea why, but in my country there are no choline pills. So, ideally I would like to find some vegan food high in choline.
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#9 Old 02-25-2010, 12:15 PM
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So, ideally I would like to find some vegan food high in choline.

One tablespoon of soy lecithin granules will give you almost 50% of your dietary requirement for choline. I don't know whether you consider lecithin a food or not though, based on your lack of interest in eating wheat germ.

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#10 Old 02-25-2010, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
So, ideally I would like to find some vegan food high in choline.



I haven't found any food (from preliminary research) that I would consider high in choline. Soy lecithin (as SomebodyElse said) is probably the best. Which is why most people, even a majority of people from "rich" countries like the U.S. (said sardonically as we go through the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression) are going to be choline-deficient.



Quote:
Statistically, average vegan live shorter than average omnivore.



I would like to see a link to this study.
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#11 Old 02-25-2010, 12:36 PM
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Tom, I think you make good points.



If you google "choline requirements", this article is the first that comes up:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2441939/



It has a link to a database of foods that contain choline, amounts etc. I think you will find it quite helpful.

http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcom...e/Choline.html

(The PDF file is probably the easiest way to display the data.)

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#12 Old 02-25-2010, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Kellye View Post

I haven't found any food (from preliminary research) that I would consider high in choline. Soy lecithin (as SomebodyElse said) is probably the best. Which is why most people, even a majority of people from "rich" countries like the U.S. (said sardonically as we go through the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression) are going to be choline-deficient.

I would like to see a link to this study.



Well, one egg cover more than 20% od daily choline req, other animal foods have high amounts too.



About study - EPIC



http://209.85.135.132/search?q=cache...ient=firefox-a



you can google studies related to EPIC, there is alot of them - i.e. they compared bone fracture among vegans and omnivores, cancer rates and so on. Only 43% of vegans use any kind of supplements, so no wonder B12 deficient group enchanced results.



I can't find right now study where they compared mortality, vegetarians with exception of fish had lower, then vegetarians and omnivores, with vegans at top. Lack of omega 3, B12 and in some countries vitamin D are most likely causes of this.



@SomebodyElse - thanks alot, I will check if soy lecitin have any drawbacks. And i do eat wheat germ, but in moderation - sorry, I don't think getting half of my daily calories from wheat germ is good idea
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#13 Old 02-25-2010, 10:40 PM
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@SomebodyElse - thanks alot, I will check if soy lecitin have any drawbacks. And i do eat wheat germ, but in moderation - sorry, I don't think getting half of my daily calories from wheat germ is good idea

I don't know of any drawbacks. Lecithin has many beneficial functions in the body, and lecithin granules aren't very expensive, at least, not in the USA.



I didn't think you would have to eat half your calories from wheat germ to get enough choline though.

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#14 Old 02-26-2010, 07:29 AM
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Well, one egg cover more than 20% od daily choline req, other animal foods have high amounts too.



So you'd have to eat five eggs a day?



Thanks for the link, I'll have to look into EPIC. I'm not vegan, just curious.
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#15 Old 02-27-2010, 12:59 AM
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So you'd have to eat five eggs a day?



No. Eating 5 eggs a day cover choline req completely, so eating nothing but them is enough to avoid deficiency. But people eat other foods, which are also high or at least moderate in choline. And highest foods are usually not-vegan.



BTW this lecithin is great, I'm eating tons of it now
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#16 Old 02-27-2010, 05:04 AM
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I just wanted to chime in and thank tom666 for the thread, because my choline intake was something I hadn't considered. I've been a Vegan for roughly 18 months and have been feeling great. Initially after going Vegan I was vigilant about making sure I was getting everything I needed and doing a lot of reading on nutrition. After a few months, I think I just settled into a pattern of eating and have been more complacent about the nutritional aspects of my diet. I do eat a variety of organic foods, but that variety although helpful doesn't necessarily ensure that I'm getting everything I need. For whatever reason, this thread has motivated me a bit to reassess the nutritional value of my diet and make adjustments if necessary.

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#17 Old 02-27-2010, 12:27 PM
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I'm vegetarian/vegan for like 15 years already and learned about choline like last week or so And it was BIG surprise, as I read everything about vegan nutrition I can find.



Another hint for you - sometimes vegans have methionine uptake below norm (even below 300 mg, when recommended is 1100). It's not neccesary bad, as low methionine diet (like 700 or 800 compared to 1100 recommended) seems to be healthy (rats on it live longer), but for runners like me it surely decrease performance, especially when uptake is really low. In rare cases lysine uptake might be low for some vegans, but not as bad as methionine.
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#18 Old 03-01-2010, 01:03 PM
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Remember these are the VEGGIE boards.

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#19 Old 07-01-2012, 06:37 AM
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Based on what I have read... the person talking about choline, B12 and Omega 3. Is a troll. 

They give out bogus information with no actual evidence. 

Vegans on average last longer than meat eaters and vegetarians when they eat correctly. 

Http://nutritionfacts.org - Shows studies showing that you can be just as healthy and live longer on a vegan diet than most people on a Standard American Diet. There is no reason to eat meat or meats at all. 

As for choline. There is no evidence to show that any vegans have ever had Choline deficiency. I would like to see a study showing vegans with Choline deficiency even those who don't supplement. 

For health requirements for being a vegan read this: 
http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-greger%E2%80%99s-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/

I strongly believe this person is pretending to be a vegan to make people believe that it's hard to be vegan. Either that or they are a sucker to propaganda from the supplement, meat and dairy industry. 

Please show evidence of studies, by giving the study name and or a link to the study with any clams you make otherwise you are just stating your opinion or belief with no evidence. Cheers.

If you are seriously worried about Choline and serious about running you would not have bothered saying all the crap about how it is so needed, and given studies on deficiencies for people to read and on top of this you would have a study on how it affects athletic performance.

B12 is caused due to living in such hygienic environments and drinking clean water. Most people who never have a B12 supplement never get a deficiency par pregnant women or some people who have problem absorbing B12. However just encase doctors recommend a B12 supplement every day. Most people never have problem with this, but some people do die because they don’t absorb B12. It is a big debate. However there are many people who have genetic problems who are non vegan and without those supplements or drugs they would die. So it’s redundant if you have problem absorbing B12 just take a supplement. It’s really not complicated.

As for omega 3. You can get it fine in flax seed, chia seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts… and lots more places. However it is said that Omega 3 oils improves brain function and this can be found in fish or algae. Eating fish would not however work due to the high amounts of mercury and toxins found in most fish these days due to pollution plus disease found in a lot of fish in general that humans can’t deal with. Just like with most animal products, humans are mostly allergic to them. So it’s best to get Algae based Omega 3 DHL Supplements if you want to improve brain function and eat them every day. There are plenty of studies sited on the website I linked above.

Back to Choline, I can not say for sure that eating more choline will or will not improve your health as I have not seen any studies to support what I say. However so far a lot of people have not known about choline and lived very long healthy lives.

A good example is “Caldwell Esselstyn” – Who won a Gold Medal in Rowing. Is now 88 years old and had a Ted talk not long ago and for his age has amazing mental skills and looks quite healthy still. Link to Ted Talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqKNfyUPzoU

 

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#20 Old 07-01-2012, 07:58 AM
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FYI - this thread is over 2 years old. Here is a source of info on vegan diets and choline from Jack Norris, a registered dietitian: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/choline

Regarding B12, all vegans and most people who eat primarily plant-based diets need a reliable source of B12 - this means a supplement or fortified foods.
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#21 Old 07-07-2012, 01:47 AM
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Originally Posted by DragonSpirit View Post

Based on what I have read... the person talking about choline, B12 and Omega 3. Is a troll. 

...

Vegans on average last longer than meat eaters and vegetarians when they eat correctly. 

Http://nutritionfacts.org - Shows studies showing that you can be just as healthy and live longer on a vegan diet than most people on a Standard American Diet. There is no reason to eat meat or meats at all. 

+1

 

If the OP is genuinely a runner, how would 200g of wheat germ possibly come to even a good fraction of half their daily caloric intake?  And wheat germ has lots of other health benefits.  And their claim on methionine deficiency? Seriously? What endurance athletes don't eat lots of grains?  Body-builders, maybe yes, but they can generally eat sesame seeds and benefit in lots of other ways from those.  Lysine is a real issue, but a well known and very addressable one, just by eating some legume derived foods and/or wheat germ regularly (easiest), taking a supplement, or a variety of other dietary strategies (e.g. choice of grains and nuts, wheat germ, spirulina).

 

IMHO B12 supplementation IS prudent for all, and especially for athletes.  (Red blood cell formation -> oxygen delivery -> maximum performance).  This is by no means purely a vegan/vegetarian issue, however.  Other primates tend to eat a small amount of insects, which have much higher concentrations of B12 than most meats eaten by modern humans, so raw vegan positions about it being unnecessary in nature are likely not on a solid foundation.

 

Re omega3: agree.  If you care greatly, taking an algae based DHA supplement is best.  If not, ALA from plants and reducing omega 6s should be adequate.  To my thinking, it's not a wildly implausible conjecture from the available archaeological evidence that the first significantly carnivorous human ancestors were actually cannibal primates, bashing open each others' skulls for DHA found in their brain tissue.  This may have a bearing on the ethics of being vegetarian for people who can see the moral concern with cannibalism but seem obsessed with the idea that we have to eat flesh because cave men did it.

 

Re choline: I found the Jack Norris article was an interesting read.  He makes a highly informed and clear cut case that it's NOT a health concern with a good vegan diet.  As with most of what JN has to say, it's pretty hard to argue with on a pure health standpoint but doesn't go into detail re performance (out of scope, perhaps).  I don't really know much about choline, had been considering/researching angles on a pre game/pre training supplement, and will put the idea on hold as likely but not certainly ineffective, and possibly a health risk, until I learn more.

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#22 Old 01-21-2013, 12:44 PM
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hi, I'm new to these forums so hope my bumping this topic is not wrong. I have recently discovered and become aware of choline as an essential nutrient.

Ive been self experimenting with the vegan diet for 2-3 years now, pretty rigorously keeping track of what i eat and what it contains, how fresh it is, how i cooked/chewed it and what state of mind i was under and other such things. Choline is relatively untalked about but seems vitaly important (especially for cholesterol and bile production, as well as brain chemical modulation, cell membrane creation). Considering those three factors...it seems almost like one of the most important nutrients of all, especially considering it is essential to obtain it from diet. Apparently from my deductive reasoning and analyizing of data, most americans get enough choline each day from eggs, meat, and eggs and soy that have been cooked into processed and bakery products that they may not even been aware of. But as a vegan, we usually dont even consider choline or realize its importance, and its almost never talked about mainstream, yet it is extremely important to get into your diet to feel good mentally and digest/ eliminate old lipids (and lipid soluble toxins). In my experience, fiber is not really that important compared to good bile production/flow which is highy dependent on getting enough choline.

     So...some info on choline sources that I've found...

Generally:   providing enough calories,

 

          Beans, Legumes (including soy), Tubers, Beer, Mulberries, Most Dairy :     A diet entirely of these would produce just enough or slighly abundant amount of choline

          Grains, Fruit, Oils, Sugars, Alcohol besides beer, Nuts, Seeds      :     A diet entirely of these would produce only 25 - 50% enough choline if all calories were obtained from these

          Vegetables, most meat (muscle and generally the meat that most people eat)     :   A diet entirely of these would provide slighly more than enough choline per calories (slightly supplemental)

          Organ meat, eggs     :     These provide, especially egg yolk, abundant amounts of choline (about 30% of daily value per egg or small serving of most organ meat)

 

So having said that...as a vegan, unless you are eating almost if not all your calories from beans, tubers, beer, mulberries...then to the degree that you have grains/fruit/nut/seed/alcohol/sugar/oil, you will have to equivalently have supplemental amounts of vegetables, meat, organ meat, or eggs.  I think this is why people who consume a lot of vegetable juice (have the juice habit) or consume a lot of wheatgrass, or other grass juices as a vegan are slighly supplementing choline each day to offset the fruits/grains/nut/seed and are ok in the long run. But vegans who eat mosly grain/fruit/nut/seed/oil with even some legumes and tubers...if not supplementing large amounts of vegetables(greens)/grass juice inaddition will be choline deficient...resulting in slightly less than optimal digestion / mood than they were used to pre being vegan because they were getting enough choline from eggs and meat without even realizing or considerign its importance.

 

 

From my experience, I have a hard time consuming enough vegetables to offset this ratio because of the time it takes simply to fully masticate and swallow them. I have also

noticed that in my recent past before realizing about choline, only stimulating advertisements with eggs would cause me cravings...where as meat and dairy adds didn't produce

such effects. Being that I was consuming mostly fruit and grains for a period of about 4-5 months, choline would be apparenly why (being that eggs are the most concentrated source, and my

body was likely deficient...as i was experiencing the general symptoms). I did some research and found that wheat grass juice, per 21 calories has about 95mg choline (daily requirement is about 400-500mg). Most wheatgrass juice powders are about 16 calories per serving. So...basically it is slighly supplemental in terms of calorie ratio for supplying choline, even a little more than other leafy vegetables. Being that it is the juice extract and not the whole plant with the fiber, it can pretty easily be consumed in relatively large amounts (though still slighly astringent on the tongue, proper dillution can help this).

 

So i pretty much have about 4 servings of wheatgrass juice powder, supplying about 64 calories (about 270-280 mg choline), which is 8 teaspoons...i dillute in about a cup of water then slowly sip/chew the juice) which in addition to an average or even slightly defficient choline diet will offset and make up the daily requirements. Ive noticed within a few days my stools were more easily passed and slid out easier (an idication of good bile flow, mucous enveloping the stool), as well as my fat containing food cravings has increased (also in indicator of better bile flow). I only usually consume only about 10-20 grams of fiber a day...yet still pass stool at least 1-3 times a day (more/less if not at work or in active mode) because i chew my food very well and maintain proper hydration, yet in the absence of proper bile the stool would be slighly gummier and leave more residue (like peanut butter) whereas with better bile flow it seems to leave less residue and slide out much easier, with no change in fiber or water content.

 

Basically, its very hard to get adequate choline on a vegan diet...most vegetarians and americans get enough without realizing how or ever considering it, and it is almost

never mentioned in the vegan community despite being one of, in my opinion, the most important nutrients to consider.

 

General overview:

       per calorie:

 

      neutral/adequate choline:  legumes, beans, beer, dairy, mulberries, tubers

      slighly to highly deficient choline:  fruit, grains, nuts, seeds, sugars, oils, wine/spirits/sake

      slighly supplemental choline:  leafy vegetables, sea vegetables, herbs, most meat, grass juices (wheatgrass, barleygrass, oatgrass, ect), algea, brewers yeast

      highly supplemental choline:  eggs, organ meat

 

Choline's apparent role is to help produce bile, which leads to better digestion of lipids (fat and cholesterol), as well as being able to clean the digestive tract each time it flows through (like soap). It also helps produce acetylcholine (brain transmittor), important for muscle control, mood, memory, sharpness. Also important for production of phospholipds which are part of every cell's membrane (therefore essential to grow/repair the body in general, in any area). 

 

I really think this is an untalked about reason why many vegans unknowingly have cravings for eggs and meat, ect...and its generally really hard to get as a vegan, and those who do get

enough (by juicing a lot and/or eating a lot of or predominatly vegies/tubers/legumes) dont realize that this is why they feel ok and other vegans dont, and therefore have no way of helping or coming to conclusions as to why certain people suffer on a vegan diet.

 

Any input or comments welcome...I'd really like to hear other peoples experience/knowledge on this subject and if it seems I have any validity. I have pretty much done the self experiementing,

research, analyzing nutritional content and comparing them to cravings to derive this info...so feedback from others is necessary to draw conclusions!  Thanks

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#23 Old 05-23-2013, 08:44 PM
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Dear Veggie Runner Guy,

 

I realize I'm responding to an old thread - I hope you get this and are still interested.  It's awesome you spent time running for the vegetarian cause, if I understood that correctly in my read through of your thread. I'm messaging because I'm wondering if you've found your means of getting choline in your diet? How do you do it? I want to stop eating meat and have been first looking at all angles of nutrition - choline is one of my last, and possibly most difficult, stumbling blocks. I'm hoping not to add choline to my list of "things I need to buy supplements for". In fact, lack of choline in plant sources is feeling like a deal breaker, and is likely the reason I just ate a big hamburger.

 

Thanks for any education you may have!!

 

Bri

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#24 Old 05-23-2013, 09:20 PM
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Pboy,

 

You're very thorough! Well done! (though slightly gross - Lol!)

 

My prelim research has lead me to similar conclusions regarding the content of different foods and the need for vegans to discuss choline. I currently eat (at least aspire to eat) an egg per day (plus fruit and grains, mushrooms, sunflower seeds, sugars, oils, wine/spirits, B12, D3, and possibly adding Zinc and DHA/EPA). Egg gives choline but I still don't feel it's adequate. I don't want to eat lentils/ beans every day :(  ...I'm going to look into wheat grass more now thanks to your input. I'm a little confused as to what you mean by "wheat grass" - is it powder? juice? grass?... When I think wheat grass, I think of jamba juice's pretty little growing grass they sell. Never tried it before so we'll see...

 

I read that lecithin (soy and I think other lecithin too) contains choline. Something like 95mg per tablespoon I think it was. But who wants to eat a tablespoon of lecithin - gross, right? Wheat germ is high as well, but has to be "toasted" to get nutrient benefits - and toasting increases the fat content to some stupid amount - I think it was 18mg/tbsp. (sorry no sourcing - I've been reading a lot and not sourcing things yet - speaking of which, do you know where you read that wheat grass has 95mg/tbsp?) I've been trying to find out more about hemp grains, and have emailed one retailer, but there doesn't seem to be research on their choline content.

 

How are things going with your diet?

 

Bri

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#25 Old 05-24-2013, 06:05 AM
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 I'm hoping not to add choline to my list of "things I need to buy supplements for". In fact, lack of choline in plant sources is feeling like a deal breaker, and is likely the reason I just ate a big hamburger.

 

 

Taking a supplement is a deal breaker and you'd rather eat a burger?  Erm okay .... rolleyes.gif

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#26 Old 05-24-2013, 10:06 PM
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Update for Hemp:  www.hempseed.ca says hemp likely does not contain choline. Their response:

 

We have never tested our hemp products for choline and we have not found any
scientific literature that states that hemp contains it. Choline would be
more likely to be present in oil (bound to the phospholipid lecithin) since
it is filtered to remove particles larger than 1 micron (phosphatidylcholine
is a relatively small molecule). Since the protein powder has most of the
oil removed it may have a low amount of phosphatidylcholine in it.

 

 

 

Quiet Vegan, supplements are expensive. Plus, there's a lot of research that says that supplements aren't adequate replacements for actual food for many nutrients (not sure for choline, but for some others).

 
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#27 Old 05-25-2013, 02:01 AM
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Quiet Vegan, supplements are expensive. Plus, there's a lot of research that says that supplements aren't adequate replacements for actual food for many nutrients (not sure for choline, but for some others).
 

 

So, just to clarify, you would rather eat meat than pay for an expensive health supplement ~ or have I misunderstood your post?

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#28 Old 05-25-2013, 05:23 AM
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 What endurance athletes don't eat lots of grains? 

Hi, nice to meet you.

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#29 Old 05-25-2013, 05:35 AM
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Pboy,

 

You're very thorough! Well done! (though slightly gross - Lol!)

 

My prelim research has lead me to similar conclusions regarding the content of different foods and the need for vegans to discuss choline. I currently eat (at least aspire to eat) an egg per day (plus fruit and grains, mushrooms, sunflower seeds, sugars, oils, wine/spirits, B12, D3, and possibly adding Zinc and DHA/EPA). Egg gives choline but I still don't feel it's adequate. I don't want to eat lentils/ beans every day :(  ...I'm going to look into wheat grass more now thanks to your input. I'm a little confused as to what you mean by "wheat grass" - is it powder? juice? grass?... When I think wheat grass, I think of jamba juice's pretty little growing grass they sell. Never tried it before so we'll see...

 

I read that lecithin (soy and I think other lecithin too) contains choline. Something like 95mg per tablespoon I think it was. But who wants to eat a tablespoon of lecithin - gross, right? Wheat germ is high as well, but has to be "toasted" to get nutrient benefits - and toasting increases the fat content to some stupid amount - I think it was 18mg/tbsp. (sorry no sourcing - I've been reading a lot and not sourcing things yet - speaking of which, do you know where you read that wheat grass has 95mg/tbsp?) I've been trying to find out more about hemp grains, and have emailed one retailer, but there doesn't seem to be research on their choline content.

 

How are things going with your diet?

 

Bri

 

I would think that eating that many eggs every week would be quite unhealthy as far as cholesterol and unhealthy fats (never mind some of the carcinogens and saturated fat in the cooked hamburger you would choose to consume).  I don't understand why eating beans/lentils every day would be such a bad thing.  It is because of taste that you don't like or digestive issues?


 
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#30 Old 05-25-2013, 02:57 PM
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Pboy,

 

On days I think I may meat at dinner, I don't eat an egg for lunch... that way I don't feel I'm getting too much cholesterol. From online research:

 

"Cholesterol intake is positively correlated to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. One large egg contains approximately 215 mg of cholesterol. The American Heart Association advises eating less than 300 mg per day, and less than 200 mg for those with heart disease." ....Also, I found a site saying more recent studies show current eggs have tested to have dropped to closer to 185mg cholesterol.

 

Additional online research:

"It's been known for some time now though that for most people, eating cholesterol actually has little effect on blood cholesterol, says the National Heart Foundation's (Australia) senior nutrition manager Barbara Eden. What's far more likely to send your bad blood cholesterol shooting up is eating saturated fat or trans fat (a fat found in many deep-fried and commercially baked products). There is little saturated fat and no trans fat in eggs." ....From what I understand, eggs have very little "bad" fats... 1.5mg saturated fat per egg.

 

Thanks for raising the question of carcinogens, which I hadn't thought of being in eggs.  I'm open to more education on that... the research seems to be debatable at a brief google glance I just took.  One interesting thing I just read... "eggs turn carcinogenic when either scrambled or fried. Dr Wayne G. Reilly ex- CSIRO top scientist once said this based on his triple test findings.
So, folks, eat only eggs that are boiled or poached, never fried nor scrambled."... I eat boiled eggs so maybe I'm ok still. :)

 

As for the hamburger, I really don't know much about the health of hamburgers, except that they contain a lot of choline and protein and they are dead animals and I try not to eat them.

 

As for the beans, I just don't really like beans, unless they're loaded with sugar, or cheese, or avocado, all things I'm trying not to eat. My feelings about beans may change soon. I've been doing pretty well getting my protein and all else without them until I discovered choline. 

 

Quiet Vegan,

 

You misunderstand me I think. I'm trying to NOT eat meat. We're on the veggie forum, remember? I've made it this far in life eating hamburgers. I've made it nowhere yet taking choline supplements. How are the supplements prepared? By whom? Are they safe? How do we know? Are they digestible? How much do they cost? Are they a good replacement for the free hamburgers I have access to via my living situation?  How much money will I make this week? Can I afford them? ... How do you get choline, if you do? :)  

 

Anyone: 1/2 cup peanuts have 38mg choline, and bonus - 73mg biotin, (but they're really high in omega 6)

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