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#1 Old 01-11-2008, 09:54 PM
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ive been lacto for about 2 months, but i jst found out about rennet and cheese, so how can i tell if the cheese has calf stomach in it (eww) or not?

and any other foods that have rennet in them?
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#2 Old 01-11-2008, 11:30 PM
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Google can help you, gnarcake. [google]rennet free cheese[/google]



http://cheese.joyousliving.com/



I do still eat cheese, but I personally don't care whether cheese has rennet in it or not because the rennet production is the least cruel part of the entire cheese-making process.



I also don't care about gelatin, carmine, or bone char though.
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#3 Old 01-12-2008, 01:27 AM
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Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

Google can help you, gnarcake. [google]rennet free cheese[/google]



http://cheese.joyousliving.com/



I do still eat cheese, but I personally don't care whether cheese has rennet in it or not because the rennet production is the least cruel part of the entire cheese-making process.



I also don't care about gelatin, carmine, or bone char though.

Sorry but this post made me sad

“May all sentient beings be free of pain and suffering.  May all sentient beings experience eternal joy and happiness.  gate gate pāragate pārasaṃgate bodhi svāhā.”
http://www.facebook.com/doktormartini
http://twitter.com/#!/MartyBaureis
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#4 Old 01-12-2008, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

Google can help you, gnarcake. [google]rennet free cheese[/google]



http://cheese.joyousliving.com/



I do still eat cheese, but I personally don't care whether cheese has rennet in it or not because the rennet production is the least cruel part of the entire cheese-making process.



I also don't care about gelatin, carmine, or bone char though.



I don't worry about it either. Of course, I try to avoid it, but I don't go out of my way to avoid it. For example, I don't buy jello because I know, chances are, it's made with gelatin. On the other hand, when I'm eating out, I won't avoid the cheesy dishes because it may or may not have animal-based rennet in it and I know the employees aren't going to know any more than I would.



My rule of thumb is that, if it's a hidden ingredient that I'd only know about if I studied the ingredients list or if I have to ask the company who produces the product, I'll eat it. If it's obviously got something in it, I'll avoid it. Someday I may take it all out of my diet, but, for now, I really can't be bothered by it.
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#5 Old 01-12-2008, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post

I don't know about other foods that have rennet, but you may want to look up foods that have gelatin, carmine, bone char...



Heck, just take a look at this website:



http://www.evilmadscientist.com/article.php/EatBugs2







thanks, knew about gelatin and bone char but not about carmine

ive decided to jst not eat cheese
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#6 Old 01-12-2008, 01:49 PM
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Good choice about not eating cheese.



Everyone may want to check out "The China Study" by T. Colin Campbell. Casein, an animal protein (found in meat and cheese, etc.), is very, very bad for people.



I used to love cheese, but the thought of ingesting casein turns my stomach.



Another good source is the cheese Podcast at CompassionateCooks.com.
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#7 Old 01-12-2008, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post

I don't know about other foods that have rennet, but you may want to look up foods that have gelatin, carmine, bone char...



Heck, just take a look at this website:



http://www.evilmadscientist.com/article.php/EatBugs2



thanks for that website. its amazing what they are putting in our food. Even more annoying how they try to cover up what it really is. Who would think something called confectioners glaze has anything to do with insects?!
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#8 Old 01-13-2008, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by pIrish View Post

I don't buy jello because I know, chances are, it's made with gelatin.




"jell-o" is a brand name... which makes "gelatin jello snacks/ mixes", so, no, it is not veg in the least.

the Jello brand, however makes pudding mixes and such, which may be vegetarian, but not vegan.



as for the cheese...you can be pretty certain that parmesean and romano cheeses are full of rennet...they are difficult to find rennetless. so assume that when you eat out, if they sprinkle parm on your pasta, theres your rennet... but you can always ask them to leave it off.

however, there is no telling what they use inside sauces.



cheddar may be a little easier to find, imo...it seems a little more easy to find. and ricotta and cottage cheese is generally safe too. (ie: rennetless)
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#9 Old 01-14-2008, 04:20 AM
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I've found an organic parmesean that's called 'baby parmesean' that doesn't have rennet in it. It can be such a tedious process finding rennet-less cheese. Your best bet would be to check out a veg-specialty store, if you have one in your area...they might have more information on their products and where they come from than a big box supermarket.
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#10 Old 01-14-2008, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by LucidAnne View Post

"jell-o" is a brand name... which makes "gelatin jello snacks/ mixes", so, no, it is not veg in the least.

the Jello brand, however makes pudding mixes and such, which may be vegetarian, but not vegan.



Jello means jello. As in, the jiggly stuff, not the pudding. I don't know where you're from, but in the three cities I've lived in, the jiggly stuff is called jello (no matter what the brand) and pudding is called pudding (no matter what the brand). It's been the same just about everywhere I've ever been as well.



Quote:
as for the cheese...you can be pretty certain that parmesean and romano cheeses are full of rennet...they are difficult to find rennetless. so assume that when you eat out, if they sprinkle parm on your pasta, theres your rennet... but you can always ask them to leave it off.

however, there is no telling what they use inside sauces.



cheddar may be a little easier to find, imo...it seems a little more easy to find. and ricotta and cottage cheese is generally safe too. (ie: rennetless)



Rennet does not always mean animal-based rennet. There are also plant-based and fungi-based rennets, which a number of companies use in place of meat-based rennet. Just because something says "rennet" doesn't automatically mean it isn't vegetarian friendly. Since it's so difficult to know whether it is or is not vegetarian friendly, especially when you can't look at the packaging yourself or call the customer service line of the company, I don't waste time trying to figure it out or fussing with the employees. I'd rather eat a cheesy dish at a restaurant that may or may not have animal-based rennet, than shove myself into a corner and be forced to create an a la carte meal out of sides (like corn, green beans, etc) just because the cheese the place uses may or may not have animal-based rennet.
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#11 Old 01-14-2008, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by pIrish View Post

Rennet does not always mean animal-based rennet. There are also plant-based and fungi-based rennets, which a number of companies use in place of meat-based rennet. Just because something says "rennet" doesn't automatically mean it isn't vegetarian friendly. Since it's so difficult to know whether it is or is not vegetarian friendly, especially when you can't look at the packaging yourself or call the customer service line of the company, I don't waste time trying to figure it out or fussing with the employees. I'd rather eat a cheesy dish at a restaurant that may or may not have animal-based rennet, than shove myself into a corner and be forced to create an a la carte meal out of sides (like corn, green beans, etc) just because the cheese the place uses may or may not have animal-based rennet.



in the US, if the package says "microbial or vegetable rennet" it will be veg....but if it is just labeled "rennet" it is animal derived.

they will most often say "enzymes" ...which doesnt specify veg/microbial or animal based "enzymes". some packages DO specify "vegetable enzymes".
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#12 Old 01-14-2008, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by pIrish View Post

Jello means jello. As in, the jiggly stuff, not the pudding. I don't know where you're from, but in the three cities I've lived in, the jiggly stuff is called jello (no matter what the brand) and pudding is called pudding (no matter what the brand). It's been the same just about everywhere I've ever been as well.



.



sleepy. haha.

(but you said it better.)



as for the "jello" issue: from the almighty wiki:



Jell-O is a brand name belonging to USA-based Kraft Foods for a number of gelatin desserts, including fruit gels, puddings and no-bake cream pies. The brand's popularity has led to its becoming a generic term for gelatin dessert across the US and Canada
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#13 Old 01-15-2008, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by LucidAnne View Post

in the US, if the package says "microbial or vegetable rennet" it will be veg....but if it is just labeled "rennet" it is animal derived.

they will most often say "enzymes" ...which doesnt specify veg/microbial or animal based "enzymes". some packages DO specify "vegetable enzymes".



Again, the only way I would eat cheese without knowing whether or not it is vegetable or meat based is if I was in a position where I could not actually read the label myself or call the company (IE: restaurant situations).
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#14 Old 01-15-2008, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by LucidAnne View Post

sleepy. haha.

(but you said it better.)



as for the "jello" issue: from the almighty wiki:



Jell-O is a brand name belonging to USA-based Kraft Foods for a number of gelatin desserts, including fruit gels, puddings and no-bake cream pies. The brand's popularity has led to its becoming a generic term for gelatin dessert across the US and Canada



Edit: Sorry. I read all but the last sentence of your message and commented too soon. Yes, that last sentence was the point I was making (that it is a generic term). Glad Wikipedia actually commented on that.
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#15 Old 01-15-2008, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post

Although it is true that rennet can be vegetable based, I can almost guarantee you that if it doesn't say it is vegetable or microbal based, it most likely is animal based. The very definition of rennet means it comes from an animal. The vegetable based versions are for vegetarians by vegetarian companies and they want you to know this (it is a selling point for them).



So, if it doesn't specifically say it's vegetable or microbal enzymes and rennet, it probably isn't.



This isn't quite right. In the US, at least, microbial rennet is less expensive than animal rennet, so most inexpensive, grocery-store cheese is actually made with microbial rennet. The problem is, since these products are not made to appeal to vegetarians, they may be made with animal rennet. You would have to contact the company to find out, and the answer may change at a later time, depending on where their supplies come from.



The word "rennet" without qualification does not mean animal rennet, it just means rennet from an unspecified source.
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#16 Old 01-15-2008, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Seusomon View Post

This isn't quite right. In the US, at least, microbial rennet is less expensive than animal rennet, so most inexpensive, grocery-store cheese is actually made with microbial rennet. The problem is, since these products are not made to appeal to vegetarians, they may be made with animal rennet. You would have to contact the company to find out, and the answer may change at a later time, depending on where their supplies come from.



The word "rennet" without qualification does not mean animal rennet, it just means rennet from an unspecified source.



Thanks. This is the point I was trying to make. You said it far better than I was able to.
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#17 Old 02-01-2008, 07:49 PM
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I was eating Kraft Parmesan cheese for a long time. I called them a few times and asked if they use animal rennet in it and they said, (no, we only use microbial enzymes). I recently called and they said the source of the enzymes in their parm cheese is lipase, which comes from calfs and lambs. Yuk! I will never eat Kraft again! Tillamook cheese is pretty good. Their labels now say "contains no animal rennet" on most of their cheeses. Check it out!
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#18 Old 02-01-2008, 07:54 PM
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I was eating Kraft Parmesan cheese for a long time. I called them a few times and asked if they use animal rennet in it and they said, (no, we only use microbial enzymes). I recently called and they said the source of the enzymes in their parm cheese is lipase, which comes from calfs and lambs. Eeek! No more Kraft!

Tillamook cheese is pretty good. Their labels now say "contains no animal rennet" on most of their cheeses. Check it out!
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#19 Old 02-01-2008, 08:21 PM
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I should get off my lazy butt and get you the names of the 4 different types of Vegan cheese I have in my fridge, and trust me I use to love chesse and if I can eat this it must be delish, so don't give it up, never give up anything you enjoy, there is always a substitute or replacement.
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#20 Old 02-09-2008, 04:04 PM
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Tillamook cheese is your friend on this issue. I think almost all of it is made with microbial rennet (vegetarian) and the cheeses are clearly marked when they are made with it.



Email the company. They will most likely answer back with a very helpful answer
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