What does tofu taste like? - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
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#1 Old 01-02-2008, 05:44 PM
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I feel horriable for even having to ask, but...



Is it good? And how should you prepare/cook it?
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#2 Old 01-02-2008, 05:50 PM
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By itself, it tastes like wet paper. Cooked properly, it's very good.

Check out the recipe section on this board for some good ideas.

You can do a million things with it. Have fun!
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#3 Old 01-02-2008, 05:51 PM
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I don't think tofu has a particular taste of its own. It absorbs the flavors it is seasoned with or marinated in and so forth. There are tons of recipes here on VB and numerous other sites such as www.vegweb.com. Stir-fry recipes are really really good.

"Women & cats will do as they please, & men & dogs should relax & get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein
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#4 Old 01-02-2008, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sallyomally View Post

By itself, it tastes like wet paper. Cooked properly, it's very good.

Check out the recipe section on this board for some good ideas.

You can do a million things with it. Have fun!



hmmm, wet paper. reminds me a bit like soymilk



I shall [attempt to] get my mom to buy some next time she goes shopping.
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#5 Old 01-02-2008, 05:59 PM
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I tried my first tofu today, it was fried and served in a soup. To me the texture was exactly the same as omelette, and it tasted of the soup.
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#6 Old 01-02-2008, 06:03 PM
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Yeah, the cool thing about tofu is that it will,( as Chryssiie said) absorb the flavor of whatever it's cooked with.
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#7 Old 01-02-2008, 06:07 PM
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Everybody's right. It tastes like what it was cooked with. Marinate it in terriyaki sauce, it's terriyaki tofu. You can cook it in or with lots of things, and do different things to it to change the texture.



Try some recipes involving tofu - you'll probably grow to love it.
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#8 Old 01-02-2008, 06:10 PM
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Nothing, really.



You should really go with your mom. Better chance of you getting what you want. Try Nasoya or Soyboy tofu... in the refrigerated section, water packed, extra firm. Get a good marinade for it while you're there too and make yourself a nice stir fry. You'll want to drain and press the tofu (pour off the water, slice it into 1/2" slices, put it between two nesting plates or cookie sheets, with a paper towel under and over the tofu, and then put something heavy on it, like a cast iron skillet or a kettle filled with water. Let it sit at least 30 minutes.), then cut it into whatever shape you like (cubes or triangles are good for stir fry), put it in some tupperware, cover in marinade, and put it in the fridge until you're ready to use it (not too terribly long or it'll be really strong.. an hour or two should be fine). When you're ready, cut up the veggies you want, stir fry them and the tofu in a bit of oil, season with some more marinade if you like, and enjoy. Easy as... tofu.

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#9 Old 01-02-2008, 07:10 PM
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when the stir fries get old, barbecue tofu is the way to go.
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#10 Old 01-03-2008, 02:13 AM
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The texture kind of reminds me of crunchy egg whites. It's alright!
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#11 Old 01-03-2008, 04:22 AM
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You know, when I first went veg I was really apprehensive about tofu...I had tasted it before at restaurants and I knew I liked it but I was nervous about preparing it and not 'doing it right' when I was first learning. What I found out is that it's a very versatile substance, capable of many tastes and textures...I've made everything from tofu nuggets to vegan alfredo sauce using it. The best way to go about it is to find a recipe of something you're interested in and then head to the supermarket, or even better, a specialty store. bring the recipe along and ask for some help while there, if you're still not sure!
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#12 Old 01-03-2008, 03:56 PM
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If you eat it on its own, it tastes like nothing. If you marinate it in soy sauce, or any sauce you wish, it will absorb the flavor like a sponge.



I don't eat tofu anymore, but when I did, I really enjoyed pre-marinated tofus like terriyaki. I'd slice it up, bake it or microwave it and put it in a tortilla.
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#13 Old 01-03-2008, 04:14 PM
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I really like tofu, but that might have to do with the fact my mom is Chinese so I grew up eating it. For myself I buy Silken Lite Tofu (Firm) because I used to be a calorie-counter, and now its just habit. (Plus, i figure a few less calories from tofu means I can have an extra handful of dried fruit or something throughout the day. :P)
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#14 Old 01-03-2008, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthly Delight View Post

For myself I buy Silken Lite Tofu (Firm) because I used to be a calorie-counter, and now its just habit.

That's great and all, but as rabid_child mentioned above, the OP will probably want firm, water-packed tofu if they are attempting a stir fry or something for the first time.



Silken tofu is better suited for smoothies, dressings and dips unless you're very familier with using it and like the texture.
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#15 Old 01-03-2008, 05:53 PM
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Silken is the brand name, I get firm tofu, heh.



http://www.morinu.com/store/Lite.html



unless you knew that too and I just really know nothing about tofu? (toootally possible, i never did my homework on tofu, I just grab a pack here and there, open, and cook.)
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#16 Old 01-03-2008, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthly Delight View Post

Silken is the brand name, I get firm tofu, heh.



http://www.morinu.com/store/Lite.html



unless you knew that too and I just really know nothing about tofu? (toootally possible, i never did my homework on tofu, I just grab a pack here and there, open, and cook.)



Actually I did know that.

The brand is "MoriNu".

The type of tofu is "silken".

All tofus in the aseptic boxes are "silken", but they can be different textures... soft, firm, etc...
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#17 Old 01-03-2008, 06:04 PM
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kay you win, haha. Oh well its worked for me so far. ^__^''
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#18 Old 01-03-2008, 06:08 PM
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It's not about winning.



It's about accuracy and giving the OP the information they're asking for. :P
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#19 Old 01-04-2008, 07:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofu-N-Sprouts View Post

That's great and all, but as rabid_child mentioned above, the OP will probably want firm, water-packed tofu if they are attempting a stir fry or something for the first time.



Silken tofu is better suited for smoothies, dressings and dips unless you're very familier with using it and like the texture.





Yes, well said. The first time I bought tofu, I accidentally bought silken tofu because I thought "Ooh less calories!", then I tried to sautee it for a quesadilla... and it failed miserably.
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#20 Old 01-04-2008, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthly Delight View Post

kay you win, haha. Oh well its worked for me so far. ^__^''



Hi there, Earthly Delight.



Take a trip to the refrigerated section of the store and buy a tub of tofu (the kind that is surrounded by water inside the package) and cook it up. You'll have a totally different experience with tofu.
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#21 Old 01-05-2008, 06:20 PM
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I personally have to say that I htink it takes on the taste of whatever it is cooked with. I like to eat it raw though, it really doesnt have much of a taste raw, but I love the texture
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#22 Old 01-09-2008, 08:39 AM
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I tried fried tofu at a Japanese restaurant and it just wasn't what I expected - the slices were too big and the breading fell right off, leaving me with these wobbly blocks the size of a deck of cards.



I like it in miso soup, really small, so I'm gonna try making it myself, in a stir fry, in smaller pieces.
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#23 Old 01-09-2008, 08:46 AM
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Tofu can taste like anything you want. One of my favorite ways to prepare it is to cut it into 1 inch cubes, marinate them in pesto sauce (from a jar or homemade), then after a little while lay the cubes out on a baking sheet greased with olive oil and toss with panko bread crumbs. Then I bake it at 350 for 20 minutes. It gets all crispy and tasted delicious with an Italian herb seasoned risotto (trader joe's has an excellent instant herb risotto).



Don't be afraid of tofu! It's a great source of protein if you're going veg. Try a couple different recipes to see what you like. The beauty is, tofu is cheap enough that if it turns out terrible you can toss it and not feel bad!
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#24 Old 01-09-2008, 11:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aijarama View Post

I tried fried tofu at a Japanese restaurant and it just wasn't what I expected - the slices were too big and the breading fell right off, leaving me with these wobbly blocks the size of a deck of cards.



I like it in miso soup, really small, so I'm gonna try making it myself, in a stir fry, in smaller pieces.



I think I know what you had: agedashi tofu, a Japanese breaded tofu dish where the breading usually does not stick to the tofu.



I fry mine up without breading, though some people dip it in cornstarch (yes, cornstarch -- you could try cornmeal too, though it won't stick as much) or flour before frying it up.
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#25 Old 01-09-2008, 11:49 PM
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Tonight, I cut some regular firm tofu into fairly thick slices and laid them out in a glass baking dish. I baked the tofu at 400 degrees F. After 40 minutes, I took the tofu out of the oven and topped it with a nice smoky barbecue sauce and some coarse-ground black pepper and cooked for 15 more minutes. (When putting the barbecue sauce on the tofu, remember that hot glass and cool liquids do not mix -- your pan can shatter from the temperature difference.)



I took the tofu and put it on a sandwich with some kale-slaw (kale, garlic, vegenaise, and apple cider vinegar) and ate it. Yummers!
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#26 Old 01-12-2008, 07:27 AM
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From where I come from, tofu is sold in so many varieties for different purposes - silken tofu for soups, semi-hard tofu for stir-fries and hard tofu (aka dou gan) for deep-fry. Then there's also tofu which contains egg, seasoned tofu and even tofu desserts. They also come in different sizes - box and tube.



Actually tofu does have a distinctive taste of its own - if it's fresh, it will have a mild sweet taste which come from soybean. That's why Japanese invented such a dish - cold tofu! :-)
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#27 Old 01-13-2008, 01:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelly~Bell View Post

hmmm, wet paper. reminds me a bit like soymilk



.



Try the vanilla flavored soymilks if you don't like plain. Most new vegetarians don't like plain soy milk when they first try it. I know I didn't. But now i do.

Also a very tasty one is hemp milk.
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#28 Old 01-15-2008, 06:06 AM
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I don't know what I could add that hasn't been said already, but tofu is not something to be scared of. I cook with tofu a lot. For cheesecakes I'll use silken tofu and tofutti cream cheese, it tastes like the real deal. Tofu really takes on the flavor you wish it to have. Yes, it will be a bit difficult to get the hang of cooking tofu right. I know I messed up a dish or two when I first started using it, but it can be had in so many dishes. Just get some and try making some favorites.
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#29 Old 01-16-2008, 06:17 PM
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God descended onto the Earth, a vast wide open space filled with many animals and humans, he pondered to himself on the thought of a superior food, one food to rule them all, a master food, forged out of the great bakeries and whisking bowls came the master food.



The Tofu!



HE then continued to adorne it with flavours which mere humans call marinated Tofu, thus tofu was born, un-used by many a foolish-man but used by those seeking power, flavour and sheer wtfbbqownageness.



This is the story of tofu, may it guide you.
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#30 Old 01-16-2008, 06:18 PM
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SRSLY guys.. bar-b-q UR tofu!!!
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