Binge eating is just ruining my life - VeggieBoards

Forum Jump: 
 25Likes
  • 12 Post By Naturebound
  • 1 Post By LedBoots
  • 1 Post By Mimosatree
  • 3 Post By ModVegan
  • 2 Post By 10LitresFitness
  • 2 Post By Emily Yu
  • 3 Post By Symondezyn
  • 1 Post By Thalassa
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 03-04-2016, 09:31 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 17
Unhappy Binge eating is just ruining my life

I was always a really heavy kid growing up. People always made fun of me.
So i decided to change and did lose some weight to get me in the normal range when I was 12. Then when high school came, things got a little out of control. I was eating less than 1000 calories a day and got to my lowest weight(not low enough to be in the underweight range tho).
People were telling me how skinny i was getting- I loved it!
I believed what people were saying and was feeling really good about myself. A cup of frappuccino a day, all summer. The weight did not come up to me right away when I was drinking the fattening stuff. That winter, my weight was so much higher than what I wanted it to be.
As a result, I want to restrict my diet and try to lose weight again. However, it does not work! The more I try to restrict, the more I want to eat. I binged. And vomited, but stopped when after very few times when I saw blood in my vomit once.
As a became a vegan, my binge eating doesn't seem to get better. I am just binging on fruits and veggies everyday. 8 bananas, 6 apples... Just as my snack in addition to large plant-based, mainly starchy, meals. I have been consuming way too many calories...Just getting kinda stressed out about the number
Any advice?
Krystal the Mushroom Girl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 03-05-2016, 04:53 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,608
Hi Krystal,

I came from the other direction, was very underweight for a long time and got healthier. I went through all kinds of eating disorder treatments, spiritual groups, therapy, dieticians. I also went through periods of bingeing/purging, bulimia as well, though because I was very underweight when I did those things I did not get to a high weight but did put on quite a bit of weight at times.

However, I am well aware of that horrible cycle and I know what it is like. It is a mindset. But also, when you restricted to 1000 calories for a while, your body went through hormonal changes to keep you from killing yourself and to protect you. More than likely, your leptin became screwed up (leptin is an appetite control hormone). Your insulin because imbalanced. And likely other physiological changes happened. So whenever you try to restrict, there are a whole cascade of physical, mental, and emotional events happening that cause you to "fail".

For me, the way out of this cycle of hell has been to eat smaller but more frequent meals thoughout the day, and not restrict. Even if you are overweight, restricting is the worst thing you can do for yourself. You are just going to trigger all those events to happen. It will make you think and obsess about food more and more. By eating more often and not trying to restrict, count calories, control what type of food you eat etc. you can begin to get beyond that. More than likely you will need help and support from a professional.

I would highly advise seeing a dietitian, preferably one that can respect and work with vegans/vegetarians and one with experience working with eating disorders. Bingeing is a serious problem and one that can't be simply solved by some internet advice. It is a process to overcome. I understand all about bingeing. I don't think the average person can comprehend just how much food I could put away in a typical binge when I did those (at least 4000 calories in a half hour span to start with, sometimes double that). I would binge to the point of being terribly sick and laying on the floor doubled over in complete agony. I would try to compensate in a number of ways and all of them not only failed to stop any weight gain or other unwanted side effects, but caused me to become much sicker and my potassium, calcium, and other electrolytes became scarily imbalanced. I finally had no choice but to seek help from a medical professional because I was on my last straw. I still have to be mindful and avoid triggers and obsessing and so on. I will not say I am 100% recovered from my eating disorder, though I have come a LONG way from where I was three years ago. It has been a long process to unravel the cycle I have been in for ten years.

I hope you can reach out for help! When I was in the worst of my ED, intuitive eating was impossible. I couldn't take the advice of "listening to my hunger signals and only eat til full" people like to give. My hunger signals were so screwed up from years of starving followed by years of making up for that by bingeing/purging. It is still hard to trust my hunger, so I tend to plan menus and stick to a meal plan but also allow flexibility and challenge myself to make last minute decisions. I am to a point where I can do that. The meal plan I stick to is also a reasonable one, not one that involves restricting or only eating a certain type of food. I can also still become too obsessed with my "meal plan" so I only allow myself a very small amount of time food and meal planning, and then let it go and do other stuff with my life. Like I said, I am a work in progress, and I speak as a fellow sufferer trying to recover. I have years of experience from various eating disorder treatments and dietitians though. I could not do this on my own without that background. I also have a lot of healthy and positive support from people in real life and online, and I adamantly avoid triggering places and people. Not to say there are not daily triggers thrown at me living in a weight obsessed society. Even on vegan forums people can get pretty obsessive about the correct way to eat, and innocent remarks can be triggering. I have to recognize that they are not personal and my perception may not be the healthiest. It is hard to do sometimes.

I also just want you to know you are a beautiful person and that you deserve to be happy and healthy. Best wishes and I hope things get better for you!

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#3 Old 03-05-2016, 05:26 AM
Not such a Beginner ;)
 
LedBoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
Hi Krystal,

I came from the other direction, was very underweight for a long time and got healthier. I went through all kinds of eating disorder treatments, spiritual groups, therapy, dieticians. I also went through periods of bingeing/purging, bulimia as well, though because I was very underweight when I did those things I did not get to a high weight but did put on quite a bit of weight at times.

However, I am well aware of that horrible cycle and I know what it is like. It is a mindset. But also, when you restricted to 1000 calories for a while, your body went through hormonal changes to keep you from killing yourself and to protect you. More than likely, your leptin became screwed up (leptin is an appetite control hormone). Your insulin because imbalanced. And likely other physiological changes happened. So whenever you try to restrict, there are a whole cascade of physical, mental, and emotional events happening that cause you to "fail".

For me, the way out of this cycle of hell has been to eat smaller but more frequent meals thoughout the day, and not restrict. Even if you are overweight, restricting is the worst thing you can do for yourself. You are just going to trigger all those events to happen. It will make you think and obsess about food more and more. By eating more often and not trying to restrict, count calories, control what type of food you eat etc. you can begin to get beyond that. More than likely you will need help and support from a professional.

I would highly advise seeing a dietitian, preferably one that can respect and work with vegans/vegetarians and one with experience working with eating disorders. Bingeing is a serious problem and one that can't be simply solved by some internet advice. It is a process to overcome. I understand all about bingeing. I don't think the average person can comprehend just how much food I could put away in a typical binge when I did those (at least 4000 calories in a half hour span to start with, sometimes double that). I would binge to the point of being terribly sick and laying on the floor doubled over in complete agony. I would try to compensate in a number of ways and all of them not only failed to stop any weight gain or other unwanted side effects, but caused me to become much sicker and my potassium, calcium, and other electrolytes became scarily imbalanced. I finally had no choice but to seek help from a medical professional because I was on my last straw. I still have to be mindful and avoid triggers and obsessing and so on. I will not say I am 100% recovered from my eating disorder, though I have come a LONG way from where I was three years ago. It has been a long process to unravel the cycle I have been in for ten years.

I hope you can reach out for help! When I was in the worst of my ED, intuitive eating was impossible. I couldn't take the advice of "listening to my hunger signals and only eat til full" people like to give. My hunger signals were so screwed up from years of starving followed by years of making up for that by bingeing/purging. It is still hard to trust my hunger, so I tend to plan menus and stick to a meal plan but also allow flexibility and challenge myself to make last minute decisions. I am to a point where I can do that. The meal plan I stick to is also a reasonable one, not one that involves restricting or only eating a certain type of food. I can also still become too obsessed with my "meal plan" so I only allow myself a very small amount of time food and meal planning, and then let it go and do other stuff with my life. Like I said, I am a work in progress, and I speak as a fellow sufferer trying to recover. I have years of experience from various eating disorder treatments and dietitians though. I could not do this on my own without that background. I also have a lot of healthy and positive support from people in real life and online, and I adamantly avoid triggering places and people. Not to say there are not daily triggers thrown at me living in a weight obsessed society. Even on vegan forums people can get pretty obsessive about the correct way to eat, and innocent remarks can be triggering. I have to recognize that they are not personal and my perception may not be the healthiest. It is hard to do sometimes.

I also just want you to know you are a beautiful person and that you deserve to be happy and healthy. Best wishes and I hope things get better for you!
This is a great post. OP, read every word. (((Hugs)))) to both of you
karenlovessnow likes this.
LedBoots is offline  
 
#4 Old 03-06-2016, 02:03 PM
Newbie
 
Mimosatree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 37
Are you drinking enough water? Sometimes you are not actually hungry you are thirsty. Try drinking 8 to 6 glasses of water a day and see how you feel.
Thalassa likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Mimosatree is offline  
#5 Old 03-06-2016, 02:27 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
Hi Krystal,

I came from the other direction, was very underweight for a long time and got healthier. I went through all kinds of eating disorder treatments, spiritual groups, therapy, dieticians. I also went through periods of bingeing/purging, bulimia as well, though because I was very underweight when I did those things I did not get to a high weight but did put on quite a bit of weight at times.

However, I am well aware of that horrible cycle and I know what it is like. It is a mindset. But also, when you restricted to 1000 calories for a while, your body went through hormonal changes to keep you from killing yourself and to protect you. More than likely, your leptin became screwed up (leptin is an appetite control hormone). Your insulin because imbalanced. And likely other physiological changes happened. So whenever you try to restrict, there are a whole cascade of physical, mental, and emotional events happening that cause you to "fail".

For me, the way out of this cycle of hell has been to eat smaller but more frequent meals thoughout the day, and not restrict. Even if you are overweight, restricting is the worst thing you can do for yourself. You are just going to trigger all those events to happen. It will make you think and obsess about food more and more. By eating more often and not trying to restrict, count calories, control what type of food you eat etc. you can begin to get beyond that. More than likely you will need help and support from a professional.

I would highly advise seeing a dietitian, preferably one that can respect and work with vegans/vegetarians and one with experience working with eating disorders. Bingeing is a serious problem and one that can't be simply solved by some internet advice. It is a process to overcome. I understand all about bingeing. I don't think the average person can comprehend just how much food I could put away in a typical binge when I did those (at least 4000 calories in a half hour span to start with, sometimes double that). I would binge to the point of being terribly sick and laying on the floor doubled over in complete agony. I would try to compensate in a number of ways and all of them not only failed to stop any weight gain or other unwanted side effects, but caused me to become much sicker and my potassium, calcium, and other electrolytes became scarily imbalanced. I finally had no choice but to seek help from a medical professional because I was on my last straw. I still have to be mindful and avoid triggers and obsessing and so on. I will not say I am 100% recovered from my eating disorder, though I have come a LONG way from where I was three years ago. It has been a long process to unravel the cycle I have been in for ten years.

I hope you can reach out for help! When I was in the worst of my ED, intuitive eating was impossible. I couldn't take the advice of "listening to my hunger signals and only eat til full" people like to give. My hunger signals were so screwed up from years of starving followed by years of making up for that by bingeing/purging. It is still hard to trust my hunger, so I tend to plan menus and stick to a meal plan but also allow flexibility and challenge myself to make last minute decisions. I am to a point where I can do that. The meal plan I stick to is also a reasonable one, not one that involves restricting or only eating a certain type of food. I can also still become too obsessed with my "meal plan" so I only allow myself a very small amount of time food and meal planning, and then let it go and do other stuff with my life. Like I said, I am a work in progress, and I speak as a fellow sufferer trying to recover. I have years of experience from various eating disorder treatments and dietitians though. I could not do this on my own without that background. I also have a lot of healthy and positive support from people in real life and online, and I adamantly avoid triggering places and people. Not to say there are not daily triggers thrown at me living in a weight obsessed society. Even on vegan forums people can get pretty obsessive about the correct way to eat, and innocent remarks can be triggering. I have to recognize that they are not personal and my perception may not be the healthiest. It is hard to do sometimes.

I also just want you to know you are a beautiful person and that you deserve to be happy and healthy. Best wishes and I hope things get better for you!
Having also experienced anorexia &bingeing/purging, I could not agree more. OP, please give NatureBound's advice a chance! It's so important to give yourself the time you need to heal. Eat the best you can, don't try to crash diet, and never beat yourself up (this is way easier said than done, I know!).

Speaking of triggering places and people, to this day, I get really annoyed with under qualified nutritionists who wander around dispensing advice that can be seriously damaging to people with EDs. My running group had a speaker a few days ago that was asking a room full of fit long distance runners to restrict their food intake and eliminate after run treats in favour of protein powder (plus she was really into gluten-free, paleo-isa eating). She also told us that every one of us should be recording all of our calorie intake. I was so annoyed I almost went up to her afterwards to tell her how dangerous her advice was.

In my case, it took me about a decade to recover to a point where I was able to listen to my body and accept myself. I still have self-image issues, but personally, it helps me a lot to never diet and avoid recording what I eat. Everyone is different, and I completely understand people often do well with a careful regimen. However, over the years I've realized I pretty much can't avoid lapsing into disordered eating patterns if I count calories, etc. These days, I'm quite happy with my health and fitness, so I can definitely there is light at the end of the tunnel. All the best, and take good care of yourself!
LedBoots, Naturebound and Thalassa like this.

YouTube:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Twitter:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




Veganism is not a sacrifice, it's a joy.
- Gary L. Francione
ModVegan is offline  
#6 Old 04-06-2016, 12:02 PM
Fitness YouTuber
 
10LitresFitness's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 30
Really sorry to hear about your misfortune, eating disorders can really make life hard (I speak from experience).

Talking to a professional really helped me get over my bad relationship with food and weight loss to get over my anorexia and that might be something you want to consider, they can help you look at matters in a different light and give you a new perspective on things to encourage a healthier and overall happier mindset.

Not that I'm an expert on eating disorders, but it sounds like the diets you are putting yourself through in an attempt to lose weight are HIGHLY restrictive, eating less than 1000 calories a day is really going to push your body and is almost certainly unsustainable for most people.

I would suggest making small but sustainable changes in your diet/activity level to take in less/burn off more calories. That's going to allow you to lose weight and keep it off, it's all about finding a way of living at a lower net calorie level that you can enjoy and not feel like you're so restricted that you have to binge.

I hope this helps! I wish you all the best
silva and Thalassa like this.

Last edited by 10LitresFitness; 04-06-2016 at 12:04 PM.
10LitresFitness is offline  
#7 Old 06-10-2016, 03:56 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Hi, Krystal. I understand your concern!

First of all, congratulations for coming out and asking for help. That is a great step to solve your problem.

I have been a vegetarian for now over 5 years. I started it because of my health condition.
When I was 19, going to university, my schedule was crazy. I was too busy to eat. I skipped meals and then binge eat whenever I had time. I was very stressed out, started to losing my health. Everything started to fall apart, I would miss the class because I was sleeping for 16 hours a day from fatigue.

I am glad to hear that you're eating something healthy, not like me. I was binge eating something like hotdogs, candy bars and ice cream and so on, the most unhealthiest thing that I could ever eat.

What I did to break my habit is I started eating something healthy instead of fast food or junk food.
The best food to eat is like cucumber, tomatoes and carrots. These don't contain high level of sugar like bananas and apples, mostly water and vitamins so actually eating a lot of those will help you losing weight.

Another thing I did is drinking tea. Not sweet tea like you can buy at the store, but the authentic traditional health brewed tea. Green tea, Mate ( highly recommended), peppermint tea, camomile... Drinking tea not only fills you up and release stress and relaxes you. And certain kind of tea like green tea or Mate help you to lose weight.

The most important thing is to keep doing these new things more than 20 days. It when you start forming a new habit. It's going to be hard to stop what you've been doing for a long time. You need to be patient and believe yourself that you can do it.

I hope it helps, and if you have any questions feel free to message me!

Thanks ,
Emily
Jenn2 and Thalassa like this.
Emily Yu is offline  
#8 Old 06-29-2016, 12:42 PM
Vegan since 1991
 
David3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,120
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoyfulOlivia683 View Post
Binge eating is tough habbit to kick.
You really have to stay disciplined.

Along with the no/slow carb thing was I allowed myself one cheat day per week. For me that's Sundays. I eat anything/everything I want on Sunday sometimes 10k+ calories.

.

Eating 10,000+ calories in a single day sounds like binge eating, doesn't it?

Olivia, it is worrisome to read a recommendation to eat so many calories in a single day.

Is it even possible to eat 10,000 calories a day, without eating fat-heavy processed foods? You would have to eat 34 donuts in order to get 10,000 calories. Or, you would have to eat 50 cups of pasta in order to get 10,000 calories.

Could you clarify your recommendation, please?


.

_________

“Under the twinkling trees was a table covered with Guatemalan fabric, roses in juice jars, wax rose candles from Tijuana and plates of food — Weetzie's Vegetable Love-Rice, My Secret Agent Lover Man's guacamole, Dirk's homemade pizza, Duck's fig and berry salad and Surfer Surprise Protein Punch, Brandy-Lynn's pink macaroni, Coyote's cornmeal cakes, Ping's mushu plum crepes and Valentine's Jamaican plantain pie."

from Witch Baby, Francesca Lia Block, 1991

Last edited by David3; 06-29-2016 at 01:05 PM.
David3 is online now  
#9 Old 06-29-2016, 02:02 PM
Veggie Regular
 
jessandreia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: ON, Canada
Posts: 1,588
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Eating 10,000+ calories in a single day sounds like binge eating, doesn't it?

Olivia, it is worrisome to read a recommendation to eat so many calories in a single day.

Is it even possible to eat 10,000 calories a day, without eating fat-heavy processed foods? You would have to eat 34 donuts in order to get 10,000 calories. Or, you would have to eat 50 cups of pasta in order to get 10,000 calories.

Could you clarify your recommendation, please?


.
I admittedly, have no personal experience with eating disorders but from hearing the story of someone who went through binge eating, what makes it binge eating or not is whether or not they are conscious of how much they are eating.

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge

jessandreia is offline  
#10 Old 06-29-2016, 03:37 PM
Super Moderator
 
silva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 8,683
I'm thinking Mark Phelps!

I'm hoping that's an exaggeration! (or it's really and Olympic athlete...)
silva is online now  
#11 Old 06-30-2016, 01:05 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,608
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoyfulOlivia683 View Post
Binge eating is tough habbit to kick.
You really have to stay disciplined.

For me the trick was to make it just 3 days. I decided to go with the slow-carb diet, only eating tofu and veggies. My body craved bread and sugar tremendously for those first 3 days. I just kept drinking water to curb the cravings.

Along with the no/slow carb thing was I allowed myself one cheat day per week. For me that's Sundays. I eat anything/everything I want on Sunday sometimes 10k+ calories.

Be sure to drink lots and lots of water as others have mentioned. Keep drinking water =).

You can do this, just get past the 3 day mark, the cravings will fade.
This would be a recipe for disaster for me. Restricting or being "strict" and "disciplined" all week and then allowing a cheat day eating anything and everything, up to that high of calories, would trigger massive bingeing. In fact this isn't that much different than what I did a lot in my eating disorder. I'm not sure, even in my worst binges, if I could have put away 10K calories in a day, but I know I could put away at least 4 or 5K even as a vegan (on stuff like peanut butter, loaves of homemade bread, pasta dishes, bags of dates...don't ask), but I was sicker than all hell afterwards, literally crawling I was so stuffed, even if that eating was spread out over the day. My body was used to my strict eating all week so that when I did shovel in all that food it was like a shock to the system. And well that led to other very unhealthy behaviors.

But I guess everyone has their own strategy, and what works for one may not work for another. I have a friend who was able to stop bingeing, lost 300 lbs and has kept it off over 15 years as a member of Overeaters Anonymous. But she has to be ridiculously strict with her diet and cut out a lot of foods. She said she makes no exceptions, and never eats dessert, sugar (other than rarely allowing herself fruit), or flour. I tried OA meetings years ago when I was very underweight but bingeing/purging a lot, and I found them more triggering and dangerous to my recovery than helpful, but it seems to help some people. I'm not sure if it can be tailored to vegans as OA is big on low/no carbs, but I suppose it could work.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#12 Old 06-30-2016, 10:11 AM
Plant Powered
 
Symondezyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 439
To start off, I just want to clarify that I am coming at this with the perspective of support, not experience, but I've had a few very close loved ones in my life struggle with binge eating, and if the trigger to eat is an emotional one, it is not as simple as just being more "disciplined". It isn't really fair to tell a person like that to just be strict, drink more water, etc. because they are not eating for hunger - they are eating for comfort, driven by an emotional need.

Until the emotional aspect is addressed, and they learn to deal with it in a healthier and more positive way, the disorder will never truly be "gone", even if it is kept under control by discipline, dieting, etc.

On a smaller scale, I think many of us, particularly in the Western world, get into the habit at a young age of dealing with emotions using food - myself included. It presents a larger problem when that leads to weight gain, because there is now a constant cycle between weight gain < guilt/shame < dieting < deprivation/sadness < comfort eating, and then repeat. Somewhere along the way, the cycle has to be broken so the person can learn to a) be comfortable with themselves regardless of weight/size, b) learn to use food as energy, not as an emotional support, and c) learn to deal with emotional issues in a healthy and positive way.
Symondezyn is offline  
#13 Old 07-04-2016, 02:34 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4
Hi Krystal,

I understand your problem! I know it is easier said than done, but don't stress out about the numbers.

The best advise I can give you (which has helped me massively with my past worries, diet and weight control) is to read up on nutrition and how different foods effect you. Even better, speak to a nutritionist if you can.

Understanding this takes away the stress as you understand exactly what your body needs, and slowly you will start understand how your body responses to different types of food.

Even if you want to lose weight, eating the right types of food will make you feel fuller for longer, which should help with your bingeing.

This may not be the silver bullet for you, but will definitely help put you on the right track.

I wish you luck!
AnnieH89 is offline  
#14 Old 01-08-2017, 11:25 AM
Newbie
 
perception's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 5
I am so glad you were able to share this! One thing I have felt is that these kind of things gain more and more power in the "shadows" of our lives. Many things begin to lose control over us when they come to light because we can begin getting encouragement, advice and breaking the cycle of binge, guilt, shame, binge.

Every person has something that works better for them. For me being in a nutrition group of some kind where I have to "turn in" my food intake, even if it's not including calories helped me a lot. I enjoyed the accountability, but even just tracking for a week to open your own eyes to your eating patterns. However, you have to also work on not allowing yourself to be controlled by feelings like shame or guilt associated with your eating patterns. when I kept track of my eating, as it actually was, not as a diet, I saw a lot of things I didn't realize before. that knowledge helped equip me to battle a part of my life that felt out of control. I could see from my charts that I almost always ate excessively later in the day (especially before bed, tired = less self control). I was able to identify that i have very specific foods that I'll call "binge triggers". for me: peanut butter, sweets (pastries/cookies), crackers. Now that I see these are a problem for me I no longer buy the items I struggle with. to make my home a safer place for better choices. I now buy all natural almond butter (no sugar), gluten free crackers and we don't keep sweets in the house at all. I am still able to have these things but I found kinds I am not "addicted to".

Another thing I noticed about myself is that when I have food out, I will graze at it until its gone, even if its half of a casserole- i would eat fives slices. I now cook food ahead of time and freeze in individual portions for me and my husband. I heat up for dinner exactly the amount that we will be eating. Because I know myself and I am much less likely to go back to the freezer and cook another serving. Same with snacks. If I bought a bag of snack, I now take it out of the box and break it down into small containers. I may choose to eat more than one container but I won't be mindlessly consuming more than I had anticipated. Be encouraged that any success is success, any growth forward is growing. As you work through this issue it wont be 100% success all the time and thats okay. remind yourself in area's that you have done better and celebrate those.
perception is offline  
#15 Old 01-09-2017, 03:50 AM
Peace
 
Sidhuriel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 169
I had BED for a good 10 years too, I constantly had a nagging voice in my head telling me that I could not have certain foods (because of my abusive father saying the same) and another that was rebelling against that and told me to EAT ALL THE FOODS.

The latter usually won and I gained lots of weight until I got therapy for my PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder). Since then, my fathers voice has left my head and I am able to eat normally without a battle prior to it.

I lost 3 stone since that shift happened without restricting anything, so for me this definitely was the key.

I think it is important to find out what triggers you, and whether you have the means to change that rather than to try to change your diet at this point.

Also, Naturebounds advice is awesome

Nothing tastes as good as compassion feels
Sidhuriel is offline  
#16 Old 01-29-2017, 05:12 PM
Bandit
 
Thalassa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 544
K I just want to get something out of the way...American culture glorifies binge eating. The number of obese people (versus people who are merely overweight) obviously reflects this.

ALSO, even within vegan food culture, I think fad diets like 30 bananas a day or being fully raw may additionally encourage binge eating, or minimize it, where as balanced vegan diets with a variety of cooked and raw foods is likely better for health (mentally and physically).

It doesn't help that this mukbang trend lurks around now, where people often film themselves eating gluttonous portions of food (however, some mukbangs do portray a more reasonable meal).

So I think there's an overall cultural problem that may be magnified by personal issues. Talking to a professional counselor is best, but so is approaching a vegan diet in a more balanced way than eating nothing but raw fruit and cooked potatoes.

"Thinkers may prepare revolutions, but bandits must carry them out"~
Ingrid Newkirk
Thalassa is offline  
#17 Old 01-29-2017, 08:18 PM
Bunny
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Canada
Posts: 11
You're not alone

I was once where you are, for 9 years straight.
I thought there was no way out of the cycle, then I read a book called "Brain Over Binge",by Kathryn Hansen. This book led to one called "Rational Recovery", by Jack Trimpey.
These books saved my life, and maybe they can help you too.
I have have link to a free pdf download for Brain Over Binge, if anyone wants me to send it to them. I can't post links yet, being a new user.
Bunny123 is offline  
#18 Old 02-21-2017, 08:53 AM
Newbie
 
veganwarrior1983's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Miami
Posts: 17
Simple trick will change your life, every time you feel like eating have a cup of black tea instead the caffeine will supress your appetite... or have a class of warm water with lemon. I use to do this when I was cutting weight for boxing matches.
veganwarrior1983 is offline  
#19 Old Today, 07:17 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7
Hi there

What you're tryng to do isn't easy, but you have to trust yourself ! I'm sure it gonna end up great for you !

I never managed to get out of this habit myself, but I'm sure you'll succeed !

Good luck, keep faith !

Regards,
Luc Camisard is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off