How Much Does How You LOOK Matter? - VeggieBoards

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#1 Old 06-13-2014, 08:17 AM
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Question How Much Does How You LOOK Matter?

this is a topic that i feel is pretty intense in our culture. many people associate "health" with "good looks." healthy means "thin." but i really don't think this is necessarily the case at all.

aside from the health angle, when it comes to being vegan, how much does how i look really matter? i know many people of vegan for health (and, yes, weight loss)…but do the animals really care?

just thought i'd see what y'all thought. recently did a vid on this cause there is SO much out there about wanting "thigh gaps" and that kind of crazy stuff…


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#2 Old 06-13-2014, 09:06 AM
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This has been somewhat on my mind lately because I have had a skin problem for most of my life, that has only been marginally improved with a healthier diet (which I kind of resent because some of what I have done to improve my diet has been extremely difficult and uncomfortable for me - glad to *feel* better but I would like to *look* better!). I am thin, at my ideal body weight, but I don't get anywhere near enough exercise and I know I would look better with some muscle.

The bad news is, looks do seem to matter in nearly every single aspect of our culture and society, from getting a job, to getting a partner/sex, to getting good treatment in a store, to testifying before Congress. When I say looks, I don't mean "thin" or "thigh gap," I mean dressing in good, well-kept clothes, having well-tailored hair, clear skin, no scars, not being wrinkled or too pale or blotchy, having (enough) hair - on your head and not other places! not having obvious handicaps such as missing a limb or having to wear a colostomy bag. Even glasses, or being the "wrong" ethnicity, can garner negative attention and turn people off. Sometimes, it's the sort of thing where you have everything "right," then it's not noticed... But if you do have a scar, or a handicap, or have thin hair, then they notice and suddenly, you're not the job seeker that had 10 years of robotics experience, you are the job seeker who has a terrible facial scar! It's pathetic, but it happens all the time, and people often don't even realize they are judging someone for the wrong reasons.

One place where I see this happening is the beauty pageant scene, i.e. Miss America... The "most beautiful woman in America" has no handicaps, no scars. Ever notice that? And she is always going to be feminine - she will never be a new Army recruit that just got a buzz cut. She won't be in a wheelchair either, or have a prosthetic leg. Why is this? I think our collective definition of beauty, especially with regard to women, is messed up.
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#3 Old 06-13-2014, 09:45 AM
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This has been somewhat on my mind lately because I have had a skin problem for most of my life, that has only been marginally improved with a healthier diet (which I kind of resent because some of what I have done to improve my diet has been extremely difficult and uncomfortable for me - glad to *feel* better but I would like to *look* better!). I am thin, at my ideal body weight, but I don't get anywhere near enough exercise and I know I would look better with some muscle.

The bad news is, looks do seem to matter in nearly every single aspect of our culture and society, from getting a job, to getting a partner/sex, to getting good treatment in a store, to testifying before Congress. When I say looks, I don't mean "thin" or "thigh gap," I mean dressing in good, well-kept clothes, having well-tailored hair, clear skin, no scars, not being wrinkled or too pale or blotchy, having (enough) hair - on your head and not other places! not having obvious handicaps such as missing a limb or having to wear a colostomy bag. Even glasses, or being the "wrong" ethnicity, can garner negative attention and turn people off. Sometimes, it's the sort of thing where you have everything "right," then it's not noticed... But if you do have a scar, or a handicap, or have thin hair, then they notice and suddenly, you're not the job seeker that had 10 years of robotics experience, you are the job seeker who has a terrible facial scar! It's pathetic, but it happens all the time, and people often don't even realize they are judging someone for the wrong reasons.

One place where I see this happening is the beauty pageant scene, i.e. Miss America... The "most beautiful woman in America" has no handicaps, no scars. Ever notice that? And she is always going to be feminine - she will never be a new Army recruit that just got a buzz cut. She won't be in a wheelchair either, or have a prosthetic leg. Why is this? I think our collective definition of beauty, especially with regard to women, is messed up.
fantastic insight, Rocket. the societal idea of beauty is indeed narrow. i myself am heavily tattooed and get some discrimination about that. now, that differs in that it is of my own creation, as are my scars from old self-harm

my largest handicaps are mental, which aren't visible…which can be good and bad. it's good in that it's not always evident, however it's rough in that it's always assumed that I'm "okay" and any battles with an invisible enemy are difficult to explain.

thank you for your insight.
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#4 Old 06-13-2014, 10:13 AM
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"Healthy" looks doesnt just mean thin. In my experience very unkempt people get just as much or more of a stigma as clinically obese people. Out in the world even someone with an ideal BMI will be regarded as inferior to an obese person when the obese person is clean, groomed, confident, and reasonably happy and the thin person is angry, dirty with frizzed out hair, in pajama bottoms and a stained T-shirt with neon Cheezy Poofz dust all down the front.
If peoples opinions about how you look matters to you then do what you can to look good, within reason. Loosing lots of weight or building muscle and fitness takes months or years. Being cleaned and groomed and holding your head high can be done in a day, so its the logical place to start.
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#5 Old 06-13-2014, 12:33 PM
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"Healthy" looks doesnt just mean thin. In my experience very unkempt people get just as much or more of a stigma as clinically obese people. Out in the world even someone with an ideal BMI will be regarded as inferior to an obese person when the obese person is clean, groomed, confident, and reasonably happy and the thin person is angry, dirty with frizzed out hair, in pajama bottoms and a stained T-shirt with neon Cheezy Poofz dust all down the front.
If peoples opinions about how you look matters to you then do what you can to look good, within reason. Loosing lots of weight or building muscle and fitness takes months or years. Being cleaned and groomed and holding your head high can be done in a day, so its the logical place to start.
Dont be the person covered in vegan Cheezy Poofz dust.
ha! indeed. i do try to look presentable but must say i never feel i look "nice" clothing and presentation-wise. i don't wear makeup and have no idea what to do with my hair and get most of my clothes from second hand stores. but i am clean and bathed…so hopefully that helps!

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#6 Old 06-13-2014, 02:54 PM
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Not wearing makeup isnt a bad thing. I've never found makeup attractive and I remember feeling sort of vindicated not long ago when a study showed that men normally find less makeup to be more attractive.
Less or no makeup shows more self confidence and cleanliness. Hard to look at someone covered in makeup and think "I'd love to lick them all over". Licking makeup is gross.
(For the record I do not go around licking the faces of strangers, it was half metaphorical)

Second hand stores are a great place to get clothes. New clothes are only new for a day anyway.
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#7 Old 06-13-2014, 06:11 PM
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Not wearing makeup isnt a bad thing. I've never found makeup attractive and I remember feeling sort of vindicated not long ago when a study showed that men normally find less makeup to be more attractive.
Less or no makeup shows more self confidence and cleanliness. Hard to look at someone covered in makeup and think "I'd love to lick them all over". Licking makeup is gross.
(For the record I do not go around licking the faces of strangers, it was half metaphorical)

Second hand stores are a great place to get clothes. New clothes are only new for a day anyway.
ha! love the image of licking someone covered in makeup…gross.

the few times i have had makeup on it just felt gross. i just don't like it at all.

i am quite tickled but the image of licking strangers, though

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#8 Old 06-13-2014, 10:00 PM
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Out in the world even someone with an ideal BMI will be regarded as inferior to an obese person when the obese person is clean, groomed, confident, and reasonably happy and the thin person is angry, dirty with frizzed out hair, in pajama bottoms and a stained T-shirt with neon Cheezy Poofz dust all down the front.
This, I think, is mostly related to social class. That is, the obese person in this case would be perceived to be of a higher social class than the dirty lean one.
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#9 Old 06-13-2014, 11:01 PM
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I have to disagree with thin being perceived as healthy.
I think that in a lot of cultures, thin is actually perceived as unhealthy, and thick (not fat) with a little bit of fat is what is perceived as healthy.
I'm a girl, and I don't get why other girls want thigh gaps. Seriously, I doubt your boyfriend or husband cares if you have a thigh gap or not.

I will say that, sadly, in others' eyes how vegans look matters more than how other people look. You know... If you're a fat omnivore, "no one cares" about your diet. If you're a fat vegan, it's strange. You're vegan, you're not supposed to be fat. If you're a thin omnivore, again no one cares (people don't associate it with your diet much). If you're a thin vegan, you're thin because you're vegan and therefore unhealthy.
I think that looking good as vegan can help more people become vegan, but if those people are doing it just to have a nice body, they're not going to be vegan for long. A lot of people eat a plant-based diet just to get a bikini body.

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge

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#10 Old 06-14-2014, 05:07 AM
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I agree with all that has been shared here, especially what jessendreia said. Although I once had a doctor compliment me on how good I looked when I was 25 lbs underweight, until she later found out I was in an eating disorder treatment center and suffering with heart and bone issues. Sadly I have been complimented on my body when I was mildly underweight and my thinness was perceived as "athleticism" even by family though I have never been an athlete but physically active. My low weight however and my sickness has had very little to do with appearance and caring how I look. On the converse side, having gained to a healthier weight, I find that people are much friendlier towards me and people smile and talk to me that never used to and don't stare at me in such awful ways. I seem to get more respect and people are less intimidated by me. and I am like the least intimidating person on the planet lol. Totally passive. Maybe it is because I am more present, focused, and engaged in what is going on around me and generally feeling better than when I was sicker and focused only on my body. I don't know.

I do think that the animals may care if we are healthy or not (as opposed to how we look) because it is hard to commit time and effort to advocating for the treatment of animals and so on if one is sick. And if a vegan is sick (heaven forbid) then omnivores like to blame this on our diet and therefore reject veganism as too extreme. But in terms of having the lowest fat percentage and being chiseled with muscle and having the absolute perfect diet, yeah, don't think the animals care lol.

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#11 Old 06-14-2014, 05:33 AM
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I have to disagree with thin being perceived as healthy.
I think that in a lot of cultures, thin is actually perceived as unhealthy, and thick (not fat) with a little bit of fat is what is perceived as healthy.
I'm a girl, and I don't get why other girls want thigh gaps. Seriously, I doubt your boyfriend or husband cares if you have a thigh gap or not.

I will say that, sadly, in others' eyes how vegans look matters more than how other people look. You know... If you're a fat omnivore, "no one cares" about your diet. If you're a fat vegan, it's strange. You're vegan, you're not supposed to be fat. If you're a thin omnivore, again no one cares (people don't associate it with your diet much). If you're a thin vegan, you're thin because you're vegan and therefore unhealthy.
I think that looking good as vegan can help more people become vegan, but if those people are doing it just to have a nice body, they're not going to be vegan for long. A lot of people eat a plant-based diet just to get a bikini body.
so true jessandreia! as vegans, everything about us, fro our appearance to our success in life, to our mental status all *must* be a result/consequence of our diet. it is frustrating.

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#12 Old 06-14-2014, 05:36 AM
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I agree with all that has been shared here, especially what jessendreia said. Although I once had a doctor compliment me on how good I looked when I was 25 lbs underweight, until she later found out I was in an eating disorder treatment center and suffering with heart and bone issues. Sadly I have been complimented on my body when I was mildly underweight and my thinness was perceived as "athleticism" even by family though I have never been an athlete but physically active. My low weight however and my sickness has had very little to do with appearance and caring how I look. On the converse side, having gained to a healthier weight, I find that people are much friendlier towards me and people smile and talk to me that never used to and don't stare at me in such awful ways. I seem to get more respect and people are less intimidated by me. and I am like the least intimidating person on the planet lol. Totally passive. Maybe it is because I am more present, focused, and engaged in what is going on around me and generally feeling better than when I was sicker and focused only on my body. I don't know.

I do think that the animals may care if we are healthy or not (as opposed to how we look) because it is hard to commit time and effort to advocating for the treatment of animals and so on if one is sick. And if a vegan is sick (heaven forbid) then omnivores like to blame this on our diet and therefore reject veganism as too extreme. But in terms of having the lowest fat percentage and being chiseled with muscle and having the absolute perfect diet, yeah, don't think the animals care lol.
totally agree, Naturebound. being healthy IS important, for us and for the animals.

and sadly it's very common to be complimented on appearance when it's a product of unhealthy habits or an eating disorder. many doctors even, as you said, aren't really aware/well-versed in these issues

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#13 Old 06-14-2014, 06:05 AM
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I'm a girl, and I don't get why other girls want thigh gaps. Seriously, I doubt your boyfriend or husband cares if you have a thigh gap or not.
A thigh gap can look very attractive if the girl has wide hips. Narrow hips and a thigh gap tends to mean the girl is underweight.

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I'm amused by OPs point of view. You're concerned with what animals think of you, but not what humans think of you. Why value the views of a less intelligent being over a more intelligent being?
Don't get me wrong, I love animals, but I wouldn't put an innocent animal over an innocent human.
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#14 Old 06-14-2014, 07:22 AM
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Not wearing makeup isnt a bad thing. I've never found makeup attractive and I remember feeling sort of vindicated not long ago when a study showed that men normally find less makeup to be more attractive.
Less or no makeup shows more self confidence and cleanliness. Hard to look at someone covered in makeup and think "I'd love to lick them all over". Licking makeup is gross.
(For the record I do not go around licking the faces of strangers, it was half metaphorical)
**Sad chuckle** Well, unfortunately, it is also hard for someone to look at a skin problem and think "I'd love to lick them all over!" I don't wear makeup every day, but I do wear it any time I don't want my skin to distract people - i.e. job interviews and going out. I generally wear only as much as I think is necessary. Lately I have not had to wear a lot, but there are times I have to use a ton. There is no question it helps my appearance.

As much as I would like to live in a world where stuff like this does not matter to people, I know full well that I don't.
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#15 Old 06-14-2014, 08:31 AM
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I think you need to temper the words said with the source, the intent, along with your personal feelings.
If it's friends who are commenting, are they typically judgmental, or trying to be constructive? Personally when I hit my forties my friends were more supportive of me accepting my weight gain and inactivity, and I really wish I hadn't listened. I had always loved food, and did yoga and kickboxing. When I injured my back in my late 30's and my lifestyle changed, I started eating as more of an hobby. Rather than confront what I deemed a problem the people around me encouraged me to "accept myself". I did, and wish I listened to my voice inside.
Once I gained the 30 lbs I still struggle with it seemed to become my new "normal".
I have to agree with Redpill about secret denial. When you get accustomed to behaviors it's very hard to be realistic. I've known so many people that swear they can't lose weight, and for the most part only eat lightly in public. When I get closer to what their real day is like I find a lot of denial, a lot of extra calories that don't get counted, a lot of exceptions. True for me too, but I see it and often just choose to look away
Just like the youtube clip of the belly dancer.

This thread has really gotten derailed. It's not okay to make random hurtful comments to anyone about appearance. When someone comments on appearance it should be said in an attempt to help and not criticize, and never be random.
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#16 Old 06-14-2014, 08:41 AM
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I just realized my comment was on a different thread! I shouldn't just leave things up and decide to comment hours later when I get back on!
I thought this was the thread about hurtful comments. Oh well, I quess it's okay.

I hate that in this day of so called equality make up is considered a daily thing women do.
I haven't worn make up in years and recall the transition. First my eye lids were kinda puffy by the lashes. I think that was probably from bacteria from eye liner. My skin was blotchier, again I think from daily use of foundation. In other words I think I looked pretty yucky. But I stayed away. My skin got better, my eyes less puffy, and I got used to how I look.
People have such stereotypes of women "needing" makeup. It's pathetic. I hear comments all the time about how men just look fine they way they are and women don't> Puh-leeze! That's just conditioning! They don't seem to realize women who never wear makeup look fine not because of genetics but because they don't wear makeup and you're used to how they look!
I actually like makeup as an occasion thing-for men too! I find dark rimmed eyes and colored lips very sexy~!
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#17 Old 06-14-2014, 12:21 PM
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I dressed in drag for a wedding once (not mine) and my female friend who was the architect of the plan had to hold me down when putting on the eye liner, lol, but your right.. it can look good on guys I cant imagine doing it every day tho.
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...it's very common to be complimented on appearance when it's a product of unhealthy habits or an eating disorder. many doctors even, as you said, aren't really aware/well-versed in these issues
When I was a teen I had absurdly low muscle mass and I was skinny. A doctor told me I needed to gain weight, so I asked him how. He told me to eat lots and lots of ice cream, milk shakes, potato chips, french fries, and lard. ...yes, lard.
That doctor took early retirement due to cardiovascular disease.
Doctors are great for broken legs and knife wounds, its rare to find one that has even the most basic level of common sense in regards to diet.
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#18 Old 06-14-2014, 12:49 PM
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I actually like makeup as an occasion thing-for men too! I find dark rimmed eyes and colored lips very sexy~!
Oh, yes I agree especially guys with blue or green eyes! :: swoon ::



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#19 Old 06-14-2014, 01:50 PM
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I dressed in drag for a wedding once (not mine) and my female friend who was the architect of the plan had to hold me down when putting on the eye liner, lol, but your right.. it can look good on guys I cant imagine doing it every day tho.

When I was a teen I had absurdly low muscle mass and I was skinny. A doctor told me I needed to gain weight, so I asked him how. He told me to eat lots and lots of ice cream, milk shakes, potato chips, french fries, and lard. ...yes, lard.
That doctor took early retirement due to cardiovascular disease.
Doctors are great for broken legs and knife wounds, its rare to find one that has even the most basic level of common sense in regards to diet.
SO SO true! doctors (MDs) typically get A course in nutrition. most of med school is "here's a symptom, here's a drug"

my father was an MD and my best friend is in her residency currently. they both had to look outside their medical training for nutritional knowledge…

oh and yes, eyeliner on men can be fantastic

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#20 Old 06-14-2014, 01:53 PM
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I dressed in drag for a wedding once (not mine) and my female friend who was the architect of the plan had to hold me down when putting on the eye liner, lol, but your right.. it can look good on guys I cant imagine doing it every day tho.

When I was a teen I had absurdly low muscle mass and I was skinny. A doctor told me I needed to gain weight, so I asked him how. He told me to eat lots and lots of ice cream, milk shakes, potato chips, french fries, and lard. ...yes, lard.
That doctor took early retirement due to cardiovascular disease.
Doctors are great for broken legs and knife wounds, its rare to find one that has even the most basic level of common sense in regards to diet.
A pediatrician once told my lactose-intolerant 13-year-old thin but healthy daughter that the best way to develop breasts and get her period was to drink 8 ounces of half and half (whole cow milk and cream) per day. We couldn't switch doctors fast enough.
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#21 Old 06-14-2014, 02:00 PM
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A pediatrician once told my lactose-intolerant 13-year-old thin but healthy daughter that the best way to develop breasts and get her period was to drink 8 ounces of half and half (whole cow milk and cream) per day. We couldn't switch doctors fast enough.
that's probably true due to all the hormones crammed in that stuff….what awful (and weird) medical advice!
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#22 Old 06-14-2014, 02:42 PM
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Dont be the person covered in vegan Cheezy Poofz dust.
This has to rank as one of my favourite quotes. Ever.



Thank you.

(though, strangely, I am finding myself wondering what it might be like ....)

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#23 Old 06-14-2014, 07:21 PM
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It matters enough to me that I look good so I take care of my hair, skin , nails and teeth .... Eat healthy vegan meals also I do yoga, drink plenty of water and I walk or ride my bicycle .... I started wearing more make up just recently. I guess I'm experimenting with different looks before I leave for college , sometimes I put make up on to look more serious, mature

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#24 Old 06-14-2014, 10:52 PM
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A pediatrician once told my lactose-intolerant 13-year-old thin but healthy daughter that the best way to develop breasts and get her period was to drink 8 ounces of half and half (whole cow milk and cream) per day. We couldn't switch doctors fast enough.
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Originally Posted by BiteSizeVegan View Post
that's probably true due to all the hormones crammed in that stuff….what awful (and weird) medical advice!
It's probably more to do with milk being a cheap and healthy source of fat (which is super important for hormone balance) and calories (for getting to a weight at which reproductive system functions). Milk is also really common in the West, so he/she probably thought it wouldn't have been that much of a lifestyle change.

The doctor probably overlooked or forgot about the lactose intolerance.
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#25 Old 06-15-2014, 01:25 AM
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It matters enough to me that I look good so I take care of my hair, skin , nails and teeth .... Eat healthy vegan meals also I do yoga, drink plenty of water and I walk or ride my bicycle
It shows LP, you are absolutely stunning x
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#26 Old 06-15-2014, 04:00 AM
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Originally Posted by RedPill View Post
It's probably more to do with milk being a cheap and healthy source of fat (which is super important for hormone balance) and calories (for getting to a weight at which reproductive system functions). Milk is also really common in the West, so he/she probably thought it wouldn't have been that much of a lifestyle change.

The doctor probably overlooked or forgot about the lactose intolerance.
Well, he was an idiot. I can see his overlooking the lactose intolerance, but how about the family history of hypercholesteremia? My mother had a near fatal heart attack at 54, with a cholesterol level in the 500's, though she was of normal weight and high activity level. Fabulous recommendation to choke down half and half every day. The child was of a perfectly normal weight for her frame. Instead of asking about family history of age of menarche, he made my daughter feel she was very late in her puberty, while she was actually right in line with the rest of the family.
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#27 Old 06-15-2014, 04:21 AM
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Originally Posted by RedPill View Post
It's probably more to do with milk being a cheap and healthy source of fat (which is super important for hormone balance) and calories (for getting to a weight at which reproductive system functions). Milk is also really common in the West, so he/she probably thought it wouldn't have been that much of a lifestyle change.

The doctor probably overlooked or forgot about the lactose intolerance.
Milk has cholesterol in it, and like many animal derived foods, may also have trace amounts of antibiotics. Whey, casein, and lactose are all common allergens found in milk. and hormones are common in milk.

http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/.../11-dairy.html

Milk is not as healthy as we are led to believe as consumers. My omnivore husband, who is a normal weight and active, has very high cholesterol and used to be a huge milk drinker (three cups a day on average). His doctor has told him several times to cut way back on milk consumption or at the very least use lowfat milk, and he now uses plant based milks more often. His mother comes from a line of dairy farmers and consumed dairy all her life but has osteoporosis. She also had a stomach tumor removed a few years ago. She rarely eats junk food, never eats out, never smoked or was around cigarettes, but basis her diet mostly on meat, dairy, with fruits and vegetables being minor "side" dishes. Not saying those problems are caused directly by her milk consumption, but there may be a correlation.

It is also common for endometriosis sufferers to be advised to avoid dairy consumption due to the hormones present in dairy and it's exacerbation of the disease.

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#28 Old 06-15-2014, 04:58 AM
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Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post
Well, he was an idiot. I can see his overlooking the lactose intolerance, but how about the family history of hypercholesteremia? My mother had a near fatal heart attack at 54, with a cholesterol level in the 500's, though she was of normal weight and high activity level. Fabulous recommendation to choke down half and half every day. The child was of a perfectly normal weight for her frame. Instead of asking about family history of age of menarche, he made my daughter feel she was very late in her puberty, while she was actually right in line with the rest of the family.
Hmm that is a bit worrisome. Though a 54 year old's risk of a heart attack is far higher than a young girl's.

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Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
Milk has cholesterol in it, and like many animal derived foods, may also have trace amounts of antibiotics. Whey, casein, and lactose are all common allergens found in milk. and hormones are common in milk.

http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/.../11-dairy.html
Cholesterol is harmful, but in moderation it's negative effects are somewhat mitigated.
The media sometimes paints milk as having hidden nasties in it, but it doesn't often talk about non-commercial milk.
I have a couple of cows (Woof and Quack) that only eat purely organic foods so I can ensure their milk is free of any additives.
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#29 Old 06-15-2014, 05:04 AM
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Hmm that is a bit worrisome. Though a 54 year old's risk of a heart attack is far higher than a young girl's.



Cholesterol is harmful, but in moderation it's negative effects are somewhat mitigated.
The media sometimes paints milk as having hidden nasties in it, but it doesn't often talk about non-commercial milk.
I have a couple of cows (Woof and Quack) that only eat purely organic foods so I can ensure their milk is free of any additives.
free of additive, yes…but it does still contain cow's milk. and that can be a big enough issue in and of itself...

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#30 Old 06-15-2014, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by RedPill View Post
Hmm that is a bit worrisome. Though a 54 year old's risk of a heart attack is far higher than a young girl's.



Cholesterol is harmful, but in moderation it's negative effects are somewhat mitigated.
The media sometimes paints milk as having hidden nasties in it, but it doesn't often talk about non-commercial milk.
I have a couple of cows (Woof and Quack) that only eat purely organic foods so I can ensure their milk is free of any additives.
Yes, but arteriosclerosis is cumulative. Many teenagers today have high cholesterol levels and the beginnings of heart disease. My children's pediatricians began testing their cholesterol levels and other lipids at very young ages due to family history.

ETA
"Most of the risk factors that affect children can be controlled early in life, lowering the risk of heart disease later in life...[snip]

...Children and teens can lower their risk of getting heart disease by changing or controlling the risk factors that can lead to heart disease later in life.

High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Smoking
Obesity
Physical inactivity

Again, some of these risk factors can be changed, treated, or modified, and some cannot. But it is important to understand that prevention is the best way to avoid a heart problem later in life. Controlling as many risk factors as possible, starting in childhood, will help reduce your child's risk of developing heart disease as an adult."
http://www.texasheartinstitute.org/H...sk_factors.cfm

Last edited by LedBoots; 06-15-2014 at 05:31 AM.
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