Free Birthing - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-07-2005, 08:43 AM
 
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I know that many of us on the board are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, or considering becoming pregnant in the future.



in light of my own interest, i've been researching my birthing options. Here in pennsylvania, a lot is illegal. It may be that a free birth--or an unassisted home birth--is an illegal action. I know that home-birth midwives are not allowed at this time, and that to use a midwife, i need to go to a birthing center (which is basicly just a hospital with larger rooms). similarly, some midwives are advocating what doctors in this area are doing--inducing labor and promoting 'pain free' births with epidurals given in the early stages of labor.



my greatest hope is to have a home birth. I would prefer that my first birth (should i choose to have one) is with a midwife present, though if i have to choose between being home and having a midwife, i think i'd choose being home! This means that i'm looking at free birth.



does anyone have any experience with free birthing? any information that you'd like to share (both positive and negative)? any ideas about the process?



thanks--and i thought it might be an interesting discussion for moms-to-be who are considering their birthing options--beyond medical births.
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#2 Old 04-07-2005, 12:29 PM
 
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I had no idea it was illegal in PA! My friend had her 2nd baby at home (the babay is now 7 months), with the assistance of her midwife and husband. She had her first baby at a birthing center ( the one in Paoli). I don't know how she did it, she's tall, but has a very model-thin type body and both of her babies were 9lbs+
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#3 Old 04-07-2005, 01:27 PM
 
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i learned from a midwife friend of mine that the insurance for home-birth midwives is nearly intolerable for them to cover and they're slowly moving toward making the practice illegal and moving all midwifery work into birthing centers.



it scares me to think that i can't make these medical decisions on my own (the decision to forgo medical intervention) in the birthing process--should i choose to give birth.



i haven't done a lot of in-depth study, just talked with midwives whom i know.
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#4 Old 04-08-2005, 10:27 PM
 
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I think free birthing is a wonderfully empowering way to have a child. I considered it briefly, but chickened out in the end. When the time came I gave birth unmedicated at a birthing center and found the experience to be very positive, not at all like a hospital with bigger rooms. I went home just a couple of hours after I gave birth, my newborn was never taken out of my room, and I was allowed to keep my son's placenta. I was also given a lot of one-on-one support during labor, which helped a great deal because I gave birth alone without any family or freinds present. My midwife actually held me during my worst contractions, and gently guided me through labor using her voice. Overall I had a really great experience... one that I don't think I would have had strapped to a bed alone in a hospital.



Anyway...

I've done a lot of research on free birthing (I plan on unassisted birth with my next child) and this is one of my favorite sites. The pictures are amazing:



http://rachyllgyne.tripod.com/thebir...lrune/id4.html







Just thought I'd share.
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#5 Old 04-08-2005, 10:33 PM
 
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Gosh, that is amazing.

I think its a neat idea but would honestly be afraid that some complication would come up and something would happen. If it did, I've never forgive myself.
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#6 Old 04-09-2005, 08:50 AM
 
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Zoebird, I've known many women who live in Ohio and have had home births. Presumably it's not illegal here, so maybe you could travel to Ohio if you want to give birth away from a hospital.



My mom's friend invited her to help out with her last baby's birth. The midwife couldn't get there in time, so the father did most of the assisting. (This was their eighth child, so they knew what they were doing.) This woman has told me she much prefers giving birth at home because it's a lot less stressed than in a hospital. She's done both ways and likes to be able to push when she feels like pushing.

Q: How many poets does it take to change a light bulb? A: 1001...one to change the bulb, 1000 to say it's already been done.
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#7 Old 04-11-2005, 02:15 PM
 
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skylark: well, travelling to another location to give birth really isn't any different than a birthing center--it still involves not being at home. but, we're not having anyone anytime soon.



RBM (Linz): most women seem to intuitively know if something is troubling and can get help if they need it. at least, that's the situation i've heard from most freebirthing parents anyway. i don't think there are any actual numbers. But, very few births actually have complications that would require medical attention, and very few people are at risk for complications. Those who are--they know and learn that early in the pregnancy for the most part--and can take the appropriate measures.



HB: thanks for sharing your experience. i went to two BCs here, and both of them were very hospital like to me. i am glad that your experience was good! also, thanks for the link!
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#8 Old 04-11-2005, 05:03 PM
 
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zoebird- Yes, you are right: most births that will have complications are considered high risk and have medical attention through the whole pregnancy. I showed this website to my boyfriend and he just looked at me: "You'd want to do that?"

I think its neat though. Childbirth is such a natural, beautiful thing...the idea of doing it in some wierd, white hospital is kind of a turn off.
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#9 Old 04-12-2005, 07:15 AM
 
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my husband read the web site and was excited and crying. he thought it was the coolest thing.



younger men may have a different response, simply because they are still heavily acculturated and for some reason, our culture sees childbirth as a difficult, medical event that requires a sterile environment and lots of medication. young men tend to be the last people to question, and often if the women don't question it (because childbirth is the realm of women), men don't either (though some do). it's kinda interesting.



i think that had i suggested freebirthing to ryan when he was 24 (when we first started dating) it would have made him very anxious. when i would mention nose piercing, he would be very anxious. now, he's really into piercing and has his own nipples pierced! so, things change over time.
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#10 Old 04-12-2005, 04:46 PM
 
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Well, my boyfriend is still 17, in High School and at homeand all that, so I am SURE that his opinions will change as life goes on. Also, he doesn't really question it, like you said...he's like, if we do ever have babies, it will be up to you. I don't understand that....I'm like, well it'd be your baby too, dear.

Anyway, exciting stuff zoe. Are you thinking about making some babies?!
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#11 Old 04-12-2005, 05:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazardbliss View Post


Anyway...

I've done a lot of research on free birthing (I plan on unassisted birth with my next child) and this is one of my favorite sites. The pictures are amazing:



http://rachyllgyne.tripod.com/thebir...lrune/id4.html







Just thought I'd share.



OMG why oh why did I click on that
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#12 Old 04-12-2005, 05:32 PM
 
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wow, that link was...whoa. how'd she do that by herself?! i guess, in the end we're animals, so i can imagine we are capable of giving birth on our own. because of today's standards, i only picture women giving birth in a hospital.



those pics were cool.
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#13 Old 04-13-2005, 05:14 PM
 
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i'm planning on making babies within the next 3-5 years. i plan, plan, plan and research, research, research as an aspect of fear management.



by looking at my options, considering them thoroughly, i know that i'm making the right decision for me.



Here are things that i do know:



1. i want to do a specialized pregnancy diet at least 1 year prior to getting pregnant;

2. i have certain financial and occupational goals that i want to meet before i become pregnant;

3. i want to have a natural child birth, if possible.



other than those three things, the rest is 'up in the air' though i'm leaning toward things like free birthing, attachment parenting, and homeschooling. we'll see though.



personally, i thought the web site was really cool, that the story was awesome, and that the birth looks incredible. birthing is really natural and even natural births can be virtually painless (See, The Gentle Birth, a book. i forget the author's name, but she's a Indian-American, NYC midwife).
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#14 Old 04-13-2005, 07:25 PM
 
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What would be a specialized pregnancy diet?
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#15 Old 04-13-2005, 07:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by rainbowmoon View Post

the idea of doing it in some wierd, white hospital is kind of a turn off.



Just to add from my experience - some hospitals are a lot more progressive than others. I loved the hospital where I gave birth to my son. The birthing rooms were an all-in-one type thing. It was a pleasant room with a huge window overlooking lots of trees, and the hospital bed converted into a delivery table, the ceiling flipped over for better lighting for the delivery time only, and everything was done in one room. Also, that hospital didn't have a regular nursery, only the NICU - all healthy babies stayed in the rooms with their moms. Dads were also allowed to sleep in.



So my hospital experience was probably better than most. My baby never left my sight, my decisions were honored, I was able to nurse on demand, and I had the benefit of lots of friendly nurses who had done it themselves (I know because I asked them).



I think free birthing could be a wonderful experience, but I thought I would share my positive hospital experience as well.



Zoebird - with the amount of thought and research you put into everything, you are going to be one heck of a parent someday.
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#16 Old 04-13-2005, 08:08 PM
 
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Thats good that you had a positive hospital experience. That sounds decent, actually...most of my ideas on this whole process come from witnessing my sister's birth when I was 9. I didn't actually witness the BIRTH, but most of the aftermath and pregnancy.

The hospital my Mom gave birth at- and keep in mind, we live in the boonies- took my sister away overnight because we was a little premature (about a month)...they put her in a warmer and hooked all these wierd white round things to her. She was the wierdest, pinkest little thing. I guess the reason why they took her away and were so strict about who could hold her and under what circumstances was because she was premature, but I remember being a little sad that she couldn't stay in the room with my Mom.

That was just a random rambling thing there. Anyway, your positive experience is great. I will check out the hospitals in my area when I do give birth- shouldn't be for quite a long time.
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#17 Old 04-14-2005, 08:27 AM
 
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there are many specialized pregnancy diets out there. Pregnant women need certain amounts of different nutrients (such as more folic acid than the average adult woman/human), so they often need a specialized diet. because i don't like vitamins and don't want to take them--it's likely that i won't want to take pre-natal vitamins. Therefore, it's important for me to understand what nutrients my body needs and how to get them from foods such that i don't have to take the vitamins.



similarly, specialized pregnancy diets may help alleviate various 'pregnancy symptoms' such as nausea, bloating, edema/swelling of joints, even back pain and head aches--and prevent various risks such as hypertention, preeclampsya (sp?), braxton-hicks contractions (early, false labor) and pregnancy-onset diabetes.



There are many types of specialized diets out there. In the book i mentioned above (the gentle birth), the midwife recommends that it be soy and gluten free and rich in whole foods (it's not necessarily vegetarian). Looking at the vegetarian pregnancy diets, there are certain recommendations there for meeting the nutrients needs of both mother and child.



there is also a specialized lactation diet.



The reason that i want to have this specialized diet before the pregnancy is two fold. First, we all know that it's difficult to change dietary habits. for many, it's difficult to go vegetarian, or to let go of soda or sweets--right? Why do we expect that when we suddenly become pregnant, it will be easy to let go of 'comfort foods" such as whole-wheat bread (gluten!)? Many women i know study pregnancy diets, but once they get pregnant, they simply rely on their vitamins. It's hard for them to change eating habits for their pregnancies, because they didn't do it before hand. By giving myself a year to 'settle into' a pregnancy diet, i'll consistantly have a pattern of eating that is 'best' for my pregnancy already in place so that when i'm pregnant, it's no struggle to change or add things to my diet--basicly, i'll already be in the habit.



the second reason for doing it a year in advance is to 'build up' a supply of nutrients in the body. it's true that roughly every three months the body has let go of all stored nutrients and replaced them with new (sometimes, it's even a daily process of getting rid of excess and what not), but it is possible to 'build up' a store of nutrients over time and to help the body maintain that store over time. In traditional cultures, when a woman is preparing for her wedding (and thereby her first pregnancy), her diet six months prior will be rich in folic acid, iron, vitamin A--to mention a few. Over the course of the 6 months, the body begins to store and utilize these nutrients differently, in preparation for pregnancy. many women notice that their fertility cycle changes, becoming stronger, healthier, more predictable--and therefore ready for pregnancy. so it may be that the body is preparing for pregnancy whereas when on a 'regular' diet, it may be more likely to have a lighter cycle, that may not be ovulatory.



So, since it will likely take me 3-6 months to adapt from my 'normal' diet to my 'pregnancy' diet, that gives me 6-9 months prior to pregnancy to make sure that i'm getting my nutrients and getting enough of them to feel comfortable. I'm setting up a basis for my baby's health well before it's even concienved, and then able to maintain that throughout the pregnancy so that the baby can develop in a healthy way.



i know that to some people, this seems extreme, but i'm also already planning on specialized yoga and exercise routines that will work throughout the pregnancy and will be adaptable for after the birth (where the child can go with me or where i must go alone--which makes nursing on cue very difficult to an extent--so it's another issue to think about seriously).



most people i know who go to birthing centers or hospitals seem to have fine births, but for me it's just not an option unless there is medical need. since i was 13 yrs old and realized that i may, someday, become pregnant, i've always wanted a home birth--with or without a midwife. It's likely that my first birth, at least, will be with a midwife and perhaps others after will be without. we'll see though.



i guess it's just one of those intuitive things. I think that this way is the best way for me, and really always have. i'm certainly not against women making other choices, as long as they are informed choices.



(thx colorful )
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#18 Old 04-14-2005, 05:10 PM
 
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the second reason for doing it a year in advance is to 'build up' a supply of nutrients in the body. it's true that roughly every three months the body has let go of all stored nutrients and replaced them with new (sometimes, it's even a daily process of getting rid of excess and what not), but it is possible to 'build up' a store of nutrients over time and to help the body maintain that store over time.



I think this is a great idea, for another reason. During your first 3 months (even 4 or 5) of pregnancy, morning sickness can be a significant hinderance to good eating. I know it was for me. When you are throwing up several times a day, and you lack an appetite for foods that you need, it can be very worrisome. So I'm all for building up your nutrient stores before you conceive!
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#19 Old 04-14-2005, 06:57 PM
 
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This is a really interesting thread. I think the pregnancy diet is a great idea...especially getting used to doing it in advance!



I'm at the point where I think that if I give birth (I have endometriosis and may not be able to have biological children) I will do it in a hospital. I will definitely use a midwife and a doula, and find a hospital with a really great setting that lets me control as much of the birth as possible, but I have come to believe that if you birth outside of a hospital, you are taking a big risk to your child's life...and I don't want to take that.



I used to think I would do a home birth or give birth in a birthing center. But after what happened to a friend of mine, I just won't. She had a medically perfect pregnancy--the baby was strong and healthy, she was strong and healthy, young, there were no extra risk factors or anything that might indicate a problem. She was about 10 days past her due date, but that is considered normal and all the tests indicated that there was no problem.



She went into labor, her water broke, she went to the birthing center, everything was going according to plan. After a while, she went to the bathroom, and noticed a lot of brown fluid leaking out of her vagina. It turned out that this was meconium (the baby's first poop), and this was a very bad sign. They put the baby on a heart monitor, and all of a sudden the baby's heartbeat slowed, and then stopped.



They rushed her to a nearby hospital where there just happened to be a qualified surgeon there to do an emergency C-section. If the surgeon had not been there, she would have had to be taken to another, further hospital and the baby would certainly have died. His APGAR score was 1/1. It turned out that he was so heavy and overdue that when her water broke, he fell on his umbilical cord and cut off his circulation.



He has significant hearing loss and will have to wear hearing aids for the rest of his life. And he came very, very close to death. There was no indication that any problems would occur. I have come to the conclusion that when something goes wrong and your baby needs help, they need it NOW and a few minutes can mean the difference between life and death. As much as I'd like to be at a birthing center and labor in water, etc., it wouldn't be worth my baby's life. I'd like to see qualified hospitals with surgeons on staff become more comfortable places to labor and give birth, so that women wouldn't have to make these choices.
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#20 Old 04-16-2005, 08:55 PM
 
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I love this site:



http://www.unassistedchildbirth.com/



Also Jinjee has an e-book on this site:



http://www.thegardendiet.com/



These are her pictures 10 days after her unnassisted birth:



http://www.thegardendiet.com/oneweek/



Amazing huh?!



This is my story:



I had planned to have an unassisted homebirth. I only saw a doctor twice during my pregnancy and it was only because I had excruciating pain in my kidney. If I knew then what I know now I wouldve taken care of that little problem myself instead of jeopardizing my health and the health of my little girl by trusting a well meaning but miseducated professional. They told me I had to be on antibiotics for the rest of my pregnancy!! (of course I did NOT) I stopped immediatly after I started feeling better. Well, I went into labor at work! I finished out my day and sat at the bar laboring with my friends & customers until I felt like I should prolly go home. (I was a bartender) So at home I focused on my body and what nature was telling me to do at the time. I walked laps around the apartment eating whitechocolate kit-cats as needed! lol My mom, brother & sister were there with me later on. Everyone was unacustomed to seeing someone birthing with no help so behind my back they got together and called the firemen! Well this FREAKED ME OUT and I ran downstairs in the middle of winter wearing only a little dress threatening to go have my baby in the street somewhere if they didn't call them off. So they did, and convinced me against my better judgement to at least call a midwife. My contractions had temporarily stopped from the stress of that whole ordeal. They were full blast again about a 1/2 hour later. Well the midwife shows up and completely takes over, invading me and telling me what to do & how to do it as if nature hasn't done this a zillion times on its own before. So now i'm stressed out trying to make the best of a miserable situation. She is demanding that I push as hard as I can when I was NOT READY to push at all! I was overwhelmed and shes convincing me to do it for the baby ect ect and everyones trying to cheer me on... Well obviously their was complications since the baby was not ready to come and her heartrate drops... So the firetruck & ambulance were called in and I was whisked off to the f-ing hospital! The next thing I knew I was being sliced open under bright lights. They showed me my daughter for all of 3 seconds (as they were taking her out the room, didn't even stop walking) and then I passed out from the drugs I finally woke up 6 hrs later to find my baby was given a vaccination I never agreed to and had been fed formula!! They wouldnt even let me see her until I started throwing a fit and demanding loud enough so that the other patients could hear. They wouldnt let us leave for a few days and I dont think I slept for more than 15 minutes at a time and only in the early morning hours. They would try to take her away to the nursery if I slept!! I had to make up a fake feeding schedule to humor them so they wouldnt give her formula. I had to write down how many minutes she would nurse for and how often according to their little schedule!! What a nightmare!! I now have a very unhappy memory of what was going to be and should have been the greatest and most empowering moment of my life. I will never forgive myself for not trusting my instincts and giving away my power... Next time i'm pregnant I will not tell anyone when I go into labor.
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#21 Old 04-16-2005, 09:05 PM
 
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Oh my goodness, how awful! I'm so sorry you had to go through that. I don't understand why women aren't trusted to birth their own babies, something we have been doing for centuries.



Why did they call the firemen of all people? That is so odd.
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#22 Old 04-16-2005, 09:14 PM
 
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The birthing rooms were an all-in-one type thing. It was a pleasant room with a huge window overlooking lots of trees, and the hospital bed converted into a delivery table, the ceiling flipped over for better lighting for the delivery time only, and everything was done in one room. Also, that hospital didn't have a regular nursery, only the NICU - all healthy babies stayed in the rooms with their moms. Dads were also allowed to sleep in.



So my hospital experience was probably better than most. My baby never left my sight, my decisions were honored, I was able to nurse on demand, and I had the benefit of lots of friendly nurses who had done it themselves (I know because I asked them).





this is exactly like the birthing center that i plan to have my child in!! so, i'm glad you had such a positive experience...



and the center is in the complex of a hospital, so if medical intervention is needed (let's hope not)...it is readily available...
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#23 Old 04-16-2005, 09:19 PM
 
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Oh my goodness, how awful! I'm so sorry you had to go through that. I don't understand why women aren't trusted to birth their own babies, something we have been doing for centuries.



Why did they call the firemen of all people? That is so odd.



I think because the firestation was not even a block away from my apartment...



ps

I love your sig!
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#24 Old 04-17-2005, 02:01 PM
 
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i still think that home-birthing would be appropriate because i am just as close to the hospital at home as i would be at a birthing center (though some birthing centers are in hospital complexes). though, i'm sorry to hear about your friend's experience, molly.



i see a much greater risk in what RVM went through and have recently heard a nightmare story (which may be urban legend) through some emails recently.



the story goes as follows. The young, pregnant vegetarian/yoga mother was going to a midwife for her prenatal care and had planned to have a home birth. She knew that, throughout the pregnancy (and before) that she and the baby had "low blood pressure" and that she was "still within healthy/normal ranges" and shouldn't worry about it.



About 8 months into the pregnancy, she and her husband were in a car accident. Her husband was rather severely injured, but she seemed to come out without a scratch. The ambulance took husband and pregnant wife to the ER. The husband needed extensive trauma care and was basicly unavailable for comment or consent during what ensued for the mother.



The doctors were checking her out and brought out the equipment to look at and monitor the baby. The wife seemed in great condition, as did the baby, and the young woman had started yoga breathing exercises to help calm herself from the effects of the accident.



During this time, her blood pressure began to return to *HER* normal, low levels. Following her lead, the baby's blood pressure/heart rate returned to it's normal, low levels. Mom was relieved. Until the doctors came in.



The doctors started to tell her that she was 'in shock' and that her baby was 'in danger' due to low blood pressure. the mother tried to explain that this was her 'normal' blood pressure and that these low numbers were also normal for her developing baby. she gave them the number for the midwife to get the information, but apparently they never called.



Instead, they decided that she was 'in shock' and 'hysterical'. they called for a psychological consult and evaluated that she seemed "too calm under the circumstances" and therefore was in a "state of shock" and "unable to understand her health needs." they attempted to ask the father for permission for an emergency c-section, but was unable to get it due to the fact that he was in surgery for his own injuries from the accident. Therefore, they decided to make the decision for her.



following hospital policy, the administration of the hospital can 'override' power of attorney if the health of another is at stake. in this case, the doctors felt that an emergency c-section and a certain medication to raise blood pressure was appropriate. They told the mother that they were taking over her medical care and decisions--because she was in shock. She asked for the written matierals and potential dangers of the use of the drug on her children. they gave her the materials.



she read the materials and learned that one side effect of the drug they wanted to use was hemorrages that could cause death or severe brain injury if given unnecessariy or in the wrong dose. she asked that they not give her child this drug treatment, that they contact the midwife.



at this point, they reminded her that they had the legal right to decide the course of action in abcense of her husband and because she was not in a psychological state to make sound decisions about the health needs of her infant. She still refused treatment and asked for an attorney AND her midwife.



They refused, took her to her c-section, knocked her out on drugs, and gave her child (a daughter) the medication.



When she woke up, she asked for her child. the nurse's assistant brought in a brown bag with the remains of her daughter inside. The drug had caused a hemorrage in the premature baby and killed her. she of course, freaked out because no one had told her of the death before bringing the remains.



the baby was removed from the mother and the mother was admitted to the psychiatric ward for "post partum hysteria" and heavily medicated for three days.



the husband was informed on the second day--once he was awake enough to understand what was going on. He gave his consent to check her out of the psych ward.



on further review of the case it was determined that:



1. the mother and baby were within healthy, normal low blood pressure standards--particularly as indicated by the medical charts maintained during her prenatal care. there was no emergency involved in the child's health.



2. the mother was in a state of sound mind and capable of making medical decisions.



3. the hospital definately crossed the line in every aspect of treatment of this woman and her infant, not to mention the negligence in regards to how they told her about her infant's death!



4. big settlement, i bet.



----



such a scary and sad story!



i think it's too bad when people won't just listen to women about their own bodies!
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#25 Old 04-17-2005, 02:25 PM
 
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Sounds like the hospital wanted to make some money while she was there. Do they really bring the remains in a bag??? That sounds odd...?
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#26 Old 04-17-2005, 03:54 PM
 
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baby remains are generally put in lunch bags before being taken to the morgue. it seems that the remains had been set aside to be taken down, but hadn't been taken down yet. there was to be an autopsy.



i remember when i was a candy stripe-er (volunteer at the hospital), i worked in maternity. i walked down so many lunch bags--originally i thought it was a nurse with a boyfriend in the morgue or something. then, one day i went 'i wonder what this guy is eating today. . .it's so light" and when i looked in, there was a tiny, dead, premature baby in it. it kinda freaked me out.
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#27 Old 04-17-2005, 04:00 PM
 
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baby remains are generally put in lunch bags before being taken to the morgue. it seems that the remains had been set aside to be taken down, but hadn't been taken down yet. there was to be an autopsy.



i remember when i was a candy stripe-er (volunteer at the hospital), i worked in maternity. i walked down so many lunch bags--originally i thought it was a nurse with a boyfriend in the morgue or something. then, one day i went 'i wonder what this guy is eating today. . .it's so light" and when i looked in, there was a tiny, dead, premature baby in it. it kinda freaked me out.

:
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#28 Old 04-17-2005, 08:36 PM
 
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Join Date: Sep 2003
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Yeah, my point was not that birthing centers are safer than home, the opposite actually, that both home and birthing centers outside hospitals are extremely risky. I don't think that women should just go ahead and give birth in just any old hospital, but it's possible to choose hospitals that are less invasive, have low C-section rates, let you direct your own birth and use a midwife, etc. Personally, I would rather risk having an uncomfortable/unpleasant birth experience than risk my baby dying from a spontaneous complication (which can arrive at any time and under any circumstance.)



That is a horrifying, INSANE story you told...terrible, and bizarre.
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#29 Old 04-18-2005, 02:13 PM
 
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i don't think that home birthing is extremely unsafe. i don't think that birthing, in general, is unsafe. i think hospital birthing can be more unsafe, for a variety of reasons, than home birthing. i'm sorta 'whatever' about birthing centers. i think that they vary so greatly (at least around here), that it's hard to say.
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#30 Old 04-19-2005, 05:21 PM
 
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I've always wanted to have a home birth, but I never heard of this unassisted birthing before (where've I been?!). I think it sounds amazing and makes good sense. However, finding a partner who'd be all for it (and taking pictures) or reassuring my mother that it'd be okay (I could see the firemen rushing into my house too!) is another story.



I love those pictures. So much nicer than seeing a woman strapped down by her ankles. And that the siblings get to be there---I always wanted to go with my mom when she went to the hospital; it was so scary for her to be gone!



Goodness. If my family only knew where I get all my 'crazy' ideas about no diapers, co-sleeping, and now unassisted births, I think they'd try to sic their fellow parishioners on this site!
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