Linux users ahoy! - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 12-31-2011, 12:37 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
I just wanted to find out if there were any Linux enthusiasts on this forum... What is your current distro, and for how long have you been using it?

I'm quite new to Linux, and right now I'm on Ubuntu 11.04, but I'll move on to anther distro in a little while... It'll probably be Kubuntu, one of the Mints or possibly Sabayon.

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 12-31-2011, 01:25 PM
Beginner
 
Indian Summer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: England
Posts: 5,391
Yeah, I think there are a couple of threads already. Anyway, I've got a netbook with the latest Ubuntu (11.10). I've used a couple of different distros in the past (openSUSE, Redhat). Redhat at work and that's also the distro running on the Veggieboards server.

I no longer post here after the disagreements and exodus related to the sale of VB back in 2012. (See my profile page.) 
Indian Summer is offline  
#3 Old 12-31-2011, 02:12 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

Yeah, I think there are a couple of threads already. Anyway, I've got a netbook with the latest Ubuntu (11.10). I've used a couple of different distros in the past (openSUSE, Redhat). Redhat at work and that's also the distro running on the Veggieboards server.

Been hearing lots of nice stuff about RHEL, and since I'll be setting up my own web server in a little while I'm looking at CentOS. But I'm really more familiar with Ubuntu, and Sabayon is also tempting, so I'm quite sure it'll be a close race...

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#4 Old 01-01-2012, 09:51 AM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

Yeah, I think there are a couple of threads already.

Sure, but I guess we can use a Linux mega-thread where we discuss the latest news from the Free and Open Source
world...

Did you for instance notice that the Mint guys now are going all the way and are forking Gnome3? Their fork is called Cinnamon, and you can read about it herehere.
Clem's (the guy behind Mint) explanation for their move can be found in this post.

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#5 Old 01-01-2012, 09:52 AM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

Yeah, I think there are a couple of threads already.

Sure, but I guess we could use a Linux mega-thread where we discuss the latest news from the FOSS world...

Did you for instance notice that the Mint guys now are going all the way and are forking Gnome3? Their fork is called Cinnamon, and you can read about it here here.
Clem's (the guy behind Mint) explanation for their move can be found in this post.

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#6 Old 01-01-2012, 11:48 AM
Beginner
 
Envy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Heaven
Posts: 6,548
If you use Linux, then it means that you are cool.

Or a nerd, it's hard to separate.

"Hell exists not to punish sinners, but to ensure that nobody sins in the first place."
Envy is offline  
#7 Old 01-01-2012, 12:31 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Envy View Post

If you use Linux, then it means that you are cool.

Or a nerd, it's hard to separate.

Yes, sure... All the cool nerds use Linux. And apart from the inherent coolness of Linux, there are several other good reasons to be a Linux user. I could for instance mention just a few: XP, Vista and Win 7. (Just kidding )

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#8 Old 01-01-2012, 12:32 PM
Beginner
 
Envy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Heaven
Posts: 6,548
nobody liked vista.

"Hell exists not to punish sinners, but to ensure that nobody sins in the first place."
Envy is offline  
#9 Old 01-01-2012, 12:36 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Envy View Post

nobody liked vista.

Well, if you didn't like Vista you're gonna luuuuuv Win8... I've actually tried the developer preview. If you're a windows user you're in for a real treat! Seriously: They're taking a huge risk!

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#10 Old 01-01-2012, 03:44 PM
Beginner
 
Indian Summer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: England
Posts: 5,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

Been hearing lots of nice stuff about RHEL, and since I'll be setting up my own web server in a little while I'm looking at CentOS. But I'm really more familiar with Ubuntu, and Sabayon is also tempting, so I'm quite sure it'll be a close race...

The RHEL distros I'm using are ancient. Unfortunately I don't have much of a choice in the matter. Anyway, I've gotten used to them and they do what I need them to do, so it's okay. I quite like Ubuntu on the client side, and will assume it's equally awesome for servers. Sabayon .... I will admit I'm a bit out of touch with distro watching, so I've not even heard of that one before.

I no longer post here after the disagreements and exodus related to the sale of VB back in 2012. (See my profile page.) 
Indian Summer is offline  
#11 Old 01-01-2012, 04:38 PM
Beginner
 
vegan cyberpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Probably some airport
Posts: 1,280
Yeah i'm linux user.

I don't like ubuntu anymore, it was fine some time ago, but they began to add more and more stuff, and the day they added the facebook tchat, i quit ^^
Just to many too heavy too useless things. But it's cool for beginners.

I use mainly debian and archlinux since they are very pure. I mean you have to install everything, including the window manager, wich means that you have only what you want, no more, no less, no junk, no wasted space, no wasted ram.

I configure them crunchbang style, wich means openbox, tint2, conky, and stuff like firefox, thunderbird, enigmail, rtorrent, irssi...
I love having something very light, very quick. Openbox Rocks !!! And you can do amazing stuff with conky+lua, search on forums for nice screenshots.

I also use openbsd and backtrack for fun and unfortunately windows 7 for some special softwares.

http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/ https://www.eff.org/ https://www.torproject.org/

http://www.enigmail.net/  http://www.openbsd.org/  https://www.ixquick.com/

http://www.opennicproject.org/ https://www.autistici.org/en/index.html  https://riseup.net/en

https://pay.reddit.com/r/privacy/wiki/index

vegan cyberpunk is offline  
#12 Old 01-01-2012, 04:40 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

The RHEL distros I'm using are ancient. Unfortunately I don't have much of a choice in the matter. Anyway, I've gotten used to them and they do what I need them to do, so it's okay. I quite like Ubuntu on the client side, and will assume it's equally awesome for servers. Sabayon .... I will admit I'm a bit out of touch with distro watching, so I've not even heard of that one before.

Sabayon is based on Gentoo, but it is supposed to work out of the box. So basically the Sabayon team have been doing the same thing to Gentoo as Ubuntu have done with Debian. Sabayon is also known to be a cutting edge distribution that includes the latest packages in their repositories. It is also a rolling release, so their main competition probably are Debian testing and Arch... I was quite impressed with them, even if I experienced typical problems, such as borking the system after doing an upgrade. For me the biggest problem is that I really have gotten used to the Ubuntu/debian way of doing things.

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#13 Old 01-01-2012, 04:51 PM
Beginner
 
beanstew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Gdansk of Oxfordshire
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

Well, if you didn't like Vista you're gonna luuuuuv Win8... I've actually tried the developer preview. If you're a windows user you're in for a real treat! Seriously: They're taking a huge risk!

I've got the Win8 developer preview running in a VM (KVM) on my Linux laptop. I only installed it yesterday so haven't really explored yet but it's certainly different.

I use Gentoo on my own machines and CentOS and Ubuntu at work. I use Linux pretty much exclusively for home computing needs and work as a Linux sys-admin and DBA on a contract basis. I've been using Linux since installing Slackware from 3.5" floppy was the only practical way to get a system running at home.

I like Gentoo as it's very tunable and gives me a lot of choice as to what versions of packages I want to run. I use WindowMaker as a window manager as it's light and fast and does virtual workspaces properly. I've never been a fan of desktop environments like Gnome and KDE but keep the libraries installed so applications that need them work. Apart from Firefox and Gimp I do most of my work with terminals and Vim.

Are you sure this is art, not vandalism?
beanstew is offline  
#14 Old 01-01-2012, 05:00 PM
Beginner
 
Digger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3,900
Ubuntu is awesome but I tackled Slackware instead because I wanted to force myself to learn the nuts and bolts of Linux and I enjoy the command line. Call me old school I guess. Unfortunately I haven't spent much time with it lately because school and work demands Windows software. But I hope to get back to Slackware soon! Plus... I like being able to call myself a Slacker.
Digger is offline  
#15 Old 01-01-2012, 05:03 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan cyberpunk View Post

Yeah i'm linux user.

I don't like ubuntu anymore, it was fine some time ago, but they began to add more and more stuff, and the day they added the facebook tchat, i quit ^^
Just to many too heavy too useless things. But it's cool for beginners.

Yes, in many ways Ubuntu have been the perfect introduction to Linux for beginners. My biggest gripe with Ubuntu at the moment, is the Unity DE. I'm not comfortable with it at all (or with Gnome Shell), so in a few months I'll find another DE/distro. (See my first post.)
Quote:
I use mainly debian and archlinux since they are very pure. I mean you have to install everything, including the window manager, wich means that you have only what you want, no more, no less, no junk, no wasted space, no wasted ram.

When it comes to the Ubuntu "bloat", a good solution is to use the alternate install CD, which basically gives you total freedom, just as with a Debian installation. I wanted to test out Debian testing (no pun intended), but I had to give it up because of a bug in the installer. (Even the guys at the Debian forums acknowledged it was a bug.) I guess I could have installed stable, and done a distr-upgrade, but I wanted to save a little time and ended up installing Mint Debian edition instead. I've never tried Arch except an Archbang installation in Virtualbox. Guess I'm also a bit intimidated by it.

Quote:
I configure them crunchbang style, wich means openbox, tint2, conky, and stuff like firefox, thunderbird, enigmail, rtorrent, irssi...

Yeah, thunderbird plus enigmail is a very good combo!

Quote:
I love having something very light, very quick. Openbox Rocks !!! And you can do amazing stuff with conky+lua, search on forums for nice screenshots.

If I had a low end netbook or something, Openbox would be great, but I'm a bit more reluctant about using it on my desktop... A little too lightweight perhaps? But YMMV.
Quote:
I also use openbsd and backtrack for fun and unfortunately windows 7 for some special softwares.

Hahaha, yes, I'm sure you can have much fun with backtrack...

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#16 Old 01-01-2012, 05:17 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanstew View Post

I use Gentoo on my own machines and CentOS and Ubuntu at work. I use Linux pretty much exclusively for home computing needs and work as a Linux sys-admin and DBA on a contract basis. I've been using Linux since installing Slackware from 3.5" floppy was the only practical way to get a system running at home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digger View Post

Ubuntu is awesome but I tackled Slackware instead because I wanted to force myself to learn the nuts and bolts of Linux and I enjoy the command line. Call me old school I guess. Unfortunately I haven't spent much time with it lately because school and work demands Windows software. But I hope to get back to Slackware soon! Plus... I like being able to call myself a Slacker.

Wow, that's awesome guys. I'm glad that there obviously are a lot of Linux expertise on this forum!

Quote:
Apart from Firefox and Gimp I do most of my work with terminals and Vim.

Well, that is geeky sir! I've never tried Vim, but I found vi to be a bit cumbersome! I finally gave up on it and installed aee on my web dev box.

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#17 Old 01-03-2012, 05:50 AM
Beginner
 
beanstew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Gdansk of Oxfordshire
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

Well, that is geeky sir! I've never tried Vim, but I found vi to be a bit cumbersome! I finally gave up on it and installed aee on my web dev box.

The first time I encountered vi was on Sun ELC workstations running SunOS 4.1.3 at University. Thought it was terrible at the time, all it did was beep at you and I couldn't work out how to exit. Love it now and use it for email (with Mutt as a mail client), documentation and everything.

Of potential interest to Linux nerds here is the Raspberry Pi
Quote:
Whats a Raspberry Pi?
The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. Its a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays high-definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming.
How much will it cost?
The Model A will cost $25 and the Model B $35.
What display can I use?
There is composite and HDMI out on the board, so you can hook it up to a digital or analogue television or to a DVI monitor. There is no VGA support, but adaptors are available.
What about audio?
Theres a standard 3.5mm jack, or you can use HDMI. You can add any supported USB microphone via a hub.
Does the device support networking? Is there Wi-Fi?
The Model B version of the device includes 10/100 wired Ethernet. There is no Ethernet on the Model A version (which we expect to be taken up mostly by the education market), but Wi-Fi will be available via a standard USB dongle.
What Linux distros will be supported at launch?
Debian, Fedora and ArchLinux will be supported from the start. We hope to see support from other distros later. We will be selling SD cards with the distros preloaded. (Sept 4 2011 originally, this FAQ suggested that Ubuntu would be supported. Because of issues with newer releases of Ubuntu and the ARM processor we are using, Ubuntu cant commit to support Raspberry Pi at the moment.)

Can't wait to get my hands on one!

Are you sure this is art, not vandalism?
beanstew is offline  
#18 Old 01-03-2012, 08:04 AM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanstew View Post

Of potential interest to Linux nerds here is the Raspberry Pi

Can't wait to get my hands on one!

Actually I've heard about that one! That's a pretty tiny computer, or what? You might have heard about the Neo Freerunner/ Openmoko? (A cell phone/OS) My brother is going to buy an upgraded version of the motherboard+case, etc (GTA04), that is powerful enough to run Debian/LXDE. I think that is a pretty awesome project. If I ever get myself a new fancy phone, I'm going to get myself one of those...

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#19 Old 01-03-2012, 09:39 AM
Beginner
 
beanstew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Gdansk of Oxfordshire
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

Actually I've heard about that one! That's a pretty tiny computer, or what? You might have heard about the Neo Freerunner/ Openmoko? (A cell phone/OS) My brother is going to buy an upgraded version of the motherboard+case, etc (GTA04), that is powerful enough to run Debian/LXDE. I though that is a pretty awesome project. If I ever get myself a new fancy phone, I'm going to get myself one of those...

Cool. I have heard about it but have never seen one. I've got a Nokia N900 which runs the Linux based Maemo. It's pretty neat.

I've recently been playing with OpenWRT on a Buffalo wireless router which is providing lots of fun.

Are you sure this is art, not vandalism?
beanstew is offline  
#20 Old 01-04-2012, 04:20 AM
Not such a Beginner ;)
 
LedBoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 5,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanstew View Post

The first time I encountered vi was on Sun ELC workstations running SunOS 4.1.3 at University. Thought it was terrible at the time, all it did was beep at you and I couldn't work out how to exit. Love it now and use it for email (with Mutt as a mail client), documentation and everything.

Of potential interest to Linux nerds here is the Raspberry Pi

Can't wait to get my hands on one!

Wow this is so cool! I use Linux Ubuntu 10, but it is thanks to my son who was sick of fixing my windows issues. It's the easiest thing, I love it.
LedBoots is online now  
#21 Old 01-04-2012, 09:49 AM
Beginner
 
Mittens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 54
I use Ubuntu 11.10 but I've used openSUSE for classes at university (but I hate it)! I love Ubuntu though - it's so beautiful!!! I know its progression hasn't been some people's cup of tea, but the beauty of it outweighs so much for me haha
Mittens is offline  
#22 Old 01-04-2012, 10:42 AM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mittens View Post

I use Ubuntu 11.10 but I've used openSUSE for classes at university (but I hate it)! I love Ubuntu though - it's so beautiful!!! I know its progression hasn't been some people's cup of tea, but the beauty of it outweighs so much for me haha

Have you ever tried KDE? (As in Kubuntu?) It is very beautiful as well, I assure you!

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#23 Old 01-04-2012, 11:50 AM
Beginner
 
obankobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 500
I'm typing this on a 7/XP desktop, while using a Debian with Fluxbox netbook (that also has an Arch partition) while the Debian XFCE / 7 laptop sits in the cabinet. I'm diverse.

Debian > Ubuntu. That's right I said it!

Mittens, I also hate Open Suse. I used it for a couple weeks, and wanted to rip its guts out.

KDE is a trap. Try XFCE, fluxbox, or openbox. KDE sucks up resources and isn't very well organized in my opinion.

Disclaimer: I'm insane.
obankobi is offline  
#24 Old 01-04-2012, 12:23 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by obankobi View Post

I'm typing this on a 7/XP desktop, while using a Debian with Fluxbox netbook (that also has an Arch partition) while the Debian XFCE / 7 laptop sits in the cabinet. I'm diverse.

Debian > Ubuntu. That's right I said it!

Mittens, I also hate Open Suse. I used it for a couple weeks, and wanted to rip its guts out.

KDE is a trap. Try XFCE, fluxbox, or openbox. KDE sucks up resources and isn't very well organized in my opinion.

The thing I like about Linux, is that you have lots of choices that suits a wide diversity of personalities. Some like the lightweight alternatives, while other are fond of more complete (or "bloated" if you like) desktop environments such as KDE, Gnome, Unity, etc.

KDE 4 has been the DE that is most demanding when it comes to resources, but if your computer isn't too old, that shouldn't be too much of a problem. And the upcoming KDE release (4.8) is supposed to use less resources and be snappier. Even though I'm on Gnome 2 right now, KDE is in my opinion is the queen of the desktop environments.

Those of you who favour lightweight environments might be interested in Razor-qt , which is a promising brand new lightweight Qt-based DE. It doesn't come with a window manager, so if you like Openbox or Fluxbox, you can use one of those as the wm.

http://razor-qt.org/
http://www.osnews.com/story/25448/Ra...op_Environment
http://www.webupd8.org/2011/12/razor...ktop.html#more

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#25 Old 01-08-2012, 06:12 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10,764
I like openSUSE. Easier for me to comprehend than openSolaris (which is unix tho, and not Linux). Although I still don't understand what was wrong with unix that caused someone to make a completely new operating system, from scratch, that works a lot like unix.

I still like windows better than either. I was able to understand the basics of windows servers and Active directory, in order to create client-server networks. I'm finding setting up client server networks in either openSUSE or openSolaris to be impossible. And the worst is Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, which i understand is needed to manage client server networks the same way Active Directory is needed for Windows networks. I was able to understand using openSUSE or openSolaris as an operating system for my personal computer, but I'm finding it impossible to comprehend anything about LDAP or find info about it I can understand. Same goes for setting up Linux or Unix as a server. there just isn't enough room in my mind to fit all the info it seems you need, to set this stuff up. By time I get to step 3 in my learning process, I find out during the time I was learning step 2, everything I still need to know, that I learned in step one, has left my mind. Even if I take copious notes. I go back and read my step one notes, and its like reading something brand new that i've never learned before, and have to start learning if I want to understand the basis of what I need to know for step 3. So learning how to set up ldap so as to use it to manage a a network of client computers - don't even know what questions to ask. With wondows server, you just click on "install Active Directory."
soilman is offline  
#26 Old 01-09-2012, 03:00 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
@soilman:
I would look into Zentyal if I were you (based on Ubuntu Server.) It comes with a gui, so setting up services can be done with the click of your mouse...

http://www.zentyal.org/

Directory Service (LDAP)
http://doc.zentyal.org/en/directory.html

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#27 Old 01-09-2012, 05:36 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

@soilman:
I would look into Zentyal if I were you (based on Ubuntu Server.) It comes with a gui, so setting up services can be done with the click of your mouse...

http://www.zentyal.org/

Directory Service (LDAP)
http://doc.zentyal.org/en/directory.html

Tangle, I'm not finding the pages you linked to be very inviting. They contain lots of jargon the meaning of which I don't understand. OK, I see that Zentyal it is a "small business server," but I can't find anything on the Zentyal page stating, or linking to, information about what hardware I need for it to run, or what operating system I need for it to run.

Language that looks, at first glance, like plain English, turns out to be too ambiguous to tell me much.
for example:

Quote:
Tentative roadmap is now published! Join the conversation about Zentyal 3.0 (out in 2012)!

In respect to a server, what is a roadmap? In regard to roads, a tentative map may be of use to a roadway engineer, who is building roads, but would be of little use to a driver or pedestrian, or anyone else who wants to use the roads. What is "out" in 2012? The software? The conversation? I don't understand the idea of software or conversation being "out." What does out mean in regard to software? Published? No longer supported? Not part of the "in-group."? What does out mean in regard to converstion?

Clicking on the "roadmap" link takes me to a page labeled "milestone 3.0" and I don't see any map at all. Really confusing. I don't see what the list under "milestone 3.0" has to do with any milestone, or map. Being able to click on "roadmap" with my mouse helps me get to http://trac.zentyal.org/milestone/3.0 a little faster than having to type in "http://trac.zentyal.org/milestone/3.0" but that doesn't help me understand what's going on there, when I get there, any better.

The pages are clearly not for someone who doesn't already know a lot about it. I'm not sure that I would be able to understand what these pages are trying to tell people, even if I was already familiar with Zentyal.

As far as I can tell, the only advantage of having a graphical interface rather than a text interface, is increased speed of doing some of the things that are done frequently. It doesn't help me understand the program or hlep me to use the program. Less frequently done things take longer to do — hunting for the correct choice near the bottom of a complex menu hierarchy takes longer than simply typing in the choice. There is often little logic to the hierarchies. If you don't know what a menu choice means, or don't understand what it does even after you click it, having the choice spelled out for you instead of having to type it in yourself, isn't much help. Especially if the language is vague. And why do the creaters of gui's often have little "tooltips" that display when you hover over a menu choice, ostensibly to give you more info about the menu choice, but which usually are nothing more than the menu choice repeated with the phrase "click here to go to" before it.For example if you hover over the menu choice "bookmarks" you see a tooltip that says "click here to go to bookmarks."
soilman is offline  
#28 Old 01-09-2012, 07:09 PM
Beginner
 
Tangle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

Tangle, I'm not finding the pages you linked to be very inviting. They contain lots of jargon the meaning of which I don't understand. OK, I see that Zentyal it is a "small business server," but I can't find anything on the Zentyal page stating, or linking to, information about what hardware I need for it to run, or what operating system I need for it to run.

I'm sorry, but Zentyal is the operating system. When it comes to hardware, it runs on a machine with modest specification since it is a server distro. And since it also is based on Ubuntu 10.04, the minimum requirements would be identical to those for Ubuntu.

Quote:
In respect to a server, what is a roadmap? In regard to roads, a tentative map may be of use to a roadway engineer, who is building roads, but would be of little use to a driver or pedestrian, or anyone else who wants to use the roads. What is "out" in 2012? The software? The conversation? I don't understand the idea of software or conversation being "out." What does out mean in regard to software? Published? No longer supported? Not part of the "in-group."? What does out mean in regard to converstion?

A roadmap is a common term in the computer world about features you want to implement in future versions of your software.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_roadmap

Quote:
The pages are clearly not for someone who doesn't already know a lot about it. I'm not sure that I would be able to understand what these pages are trying to tell people, even if I was already familiar with Zentyal.

I'm no rocket scientist and I'm new to Linux myself, but I've been able to set up my own web server (not Zentyal, but plain Ubuntu) with minimal trouble. I'm not saying that setting up servers can't be difficult, (I hear LDAP stuff can be complicated) but distros like Zentyal definitively makes it easier. (Too easy, some say.)

If it is an easy or complicated job depends on exactly what you're trying to accomplish... Were you trying to set up a home server or something?

The media is the message
Tangle is offline  
#29 Old 01-13-2012, 10:39 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10,764
No, not a home server. A server for a small or large business. I have taken courses to get mcsa certification, which involve microsoft servers. With some exceptions in some areas, the setup is not particularly difficult to understand, or difficult to do. Setting up acitve directory involves pressing some keys or making a few mouse clicks, and you have it set up. Setting up computers and users in Active Dir, is not difficult. Doing this with Linux or Unix seems to be much more difficult. I have set up unix and linux workstations with no problems, but setting up as a server is daunting. Esp w regard to LDAP.

It would be nice if I had some knowhow in unix or linux in addtion to windows. With windows I could easily learn simply by buying a copy of windows server and reading the documentation. i also learned how to access active dir on the domain controller, from an xp computer. I have a copy of linux and unix, which I have set up as workstations, but I can't figure out how to set up either as a server, from the documentation. Or how to set up LDAP. By the way I haven't found any info about getting certification in Linux or Unix server operation, comparable to mcsa or mcse certification, for windows servers. Apparently employers who hire unix server people don't care about certification. It is all about actual knowledge and experience not being able to pass a stupid test. Which is good. But the knowledge is not "encapsulated" anywhere either.
soilman is offline  
#30 Old 01-13-2012, 12:00 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangle View Post

I'm sorry, but Zentyal is the operating system. When it comes to hardware, it runs on a machine with modest specification since it is a server distro. And since it also is based on Ubuntu 10.04, the minimum requirements would be identical to those for Ubuntu.

I'm not seeing that. Running a server generally requires a machine with more advanced specs than workstations require. The more clients they have dependent on them, the more advanced the machine, actually plural machines, need to be. And nowhere on the Zentyal page does it say it is an operating system, or based on Ubuntu. A search for the term "operating system" on that page turns up nothing.

Quote:
A roadmap is a common term in the computer world about features you want to implement in future versions of your software.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_roadmap

Never heard the term used that way before, and I've taken a year of coursework in compTIA A+, Net+, mcsa, ccna, and basic unix, not to mention project management. And i've actually passed the 2 compTIA A+ tests and gotten CompTIA A+ certified. A search through the pdf for my CompTIA project plus course book show no use of the term.


Quote:
I'm no rocket scientist and I'm new to Linux myself, but I've been able to set up my own web server (not Zentyal, but plain Ubuntu) with minimal trouble. I'm not saying that setting up servers can't be difficult, (I hear LDAP stuff can be complicated) but distros like Zentyal definitively makes it easier. (Too easy, some say.)

There certainly is no clue that this is true, from the pretty-looking but communicationally-challenged web page for Zentyal. In any case, web servers are only one of many kinds of servers. I'm interested in setting up LAN's for small and large businesses, with all the different kinds of servers they will need, web servers being only one of them. Further, my experience with web servers and Linux has been starting with any Linux distribution and then downloading, and then configuring, an Apache server, which appears to be the most frequently used system for displaying web pages on the internet.

Quote:
If it is an easy or complicated job depends on exactly what you're trying to accomplish... Were you trying to set up a home server or something?

See my previous message.
soilman is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off