Dwarf lime tree help - VeggieBoards

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#1 Old 11-08-2015, 05:52 AM
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Dwarf lime tree help

We got a dwarf lime for in our kitchen and it was doing great for a few months and then about 2 weeks ago my husband for whatever reason gave it about 8-10 cups of water (knowing that there very finicky about water) and then it started dropping leaves like crazy and now it has none. Is there anything we can do or is it dead?
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#2 Old 11-09-2015, 03:55 PM
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I don't think overwatering it once would kill it.

It's been doing great for a few months, but I see you're in Pennsylvania. Autumn is hard on many plants. Was it outdoors before? If so, maybe it's just adjusting to being inside. If it's been inside all along, maybe it misses the long, bright days.

Also, I think citrus trees need a slightly different fertilizer. I don't know if they need a slightly acid soil without too much lime, or something else.

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#3 Old 11-12-2015, 04:59 PM
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We pretty much kept it inside since we got it,in front of the slider window. It gets pretty hot there when the sun shines in. And they do take a certain fertilizer but i think we read that your only supposed to fertilize once a month or a fewtimes a year or something. Idk the leaves just arent coming back.
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#4 Old 11-14-2015, 11:41 AM
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Hmm... do limes drop their leaves, the way most trees in the North do, or do they have leaves all year round? I think most plants can come back after losing their leaves but I don't know why yours dropped them.

Peasant (1963-1972) and Fluffy (1970s?-1982- I think of you as 'Ambrose' now)- Your spirits outshone some humans I have known. Be happy forever.
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#5 Old 12-10-2015, 06:18 PM
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A lot of it has to do with temperatures dropping. (and the watering time) Limes are the most delicate of all citrus. Think of it like the colors of citrus fruit, going backwards as in a rainbow.

Green, yellow, orange, with orange being able to withstand the most cold, and green the least. Kind of in reverse.

Watering it and a sharp drop in temps could cause it to drop leaves, but if you are able to keep the roots warm, it should recover.

Light is also important. I would place it in the warmest room of your house. With a strong Grow light.

Lime is very picky, the most snooty of all citrus, imho.
Ever wonder why one type of lime is called Key lime? It only grows in the Florida Keys, the warmest spot in continental US.

We have a Kaffir lime, Meyers lemon, and Dancy tangerine. The Kaffir. even down here; gives us notice.

Regular palm and citrus fertilizer 3 times a year (3 month interval, stop in winter) is good. Do granular on surface of pot. The addition of Osmocote beads 4 times a year helps balance out the other minerals and nutrients needed by the plant.

When outside temps rise above 45 in spring and stay steady, place the plant outside in a mostly shaded area. And if you see roots growing out of pot bottom, time to trim the roots, (yes, with garden scissors including bottom, citrus make a root system that mainly seek the surface, not a tap-root type plant). Rough them up with your hands, revitalize the soil, (replace) and repot into a pot at least 2 inches larger and deeper than you have it in now.


edit: Some of the biggest mistakes I've seen Gardeners make is thinking that a potted plant can live in the same pot, with same soil, no addition of new nutrients and ferts; and never roughing up the root ball upon re-potting.

Last edited by Ovo-Lacto-Vegetarian; 12-10-2015 at 07:01 PM.
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