Fawn with broken leg. - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
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#1 Old 01-21-2009, 12:18 PM
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We've had deer grazing on our land for a while, and this morning the man who owns them is picking them up. He's leaving four for us to keep.

I'm just not going to think about what the poor things will end up as.

When they were being shut into a contained area so they could be filtered on to the truck, the fawns panicked, and one broke its leg. Dad says it will have to be shot. Does anyone know much about deer? Could it make it if we kept it?
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#2 Old 01-21-2009, 12:24 PM
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I just did a search on google and found some information, and it seems if we just allow it to heal itself it should be fine within a couple of months. Any other information people might have on this could be helpful though. =]
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#3 Old 01-21-2009, 12:29 PM
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Do you have a wildlife protection service or sanctuary in the area? They might be able to take the fawn and set the bone for her. We have a nature park here that takes in injured and orphaned wild animals, they do this for moose and caribou all the time. While the bone can heal on its own it might take a long time.
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#4 Old 01-21-2009, 12:44 PM
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go to a vet specialising in farm animals. While I have worked with a vet, I have seen a large calf treated for a broken leg (unsuccesful - it was shot) and two lambs (both successful). It is a small fawn, then they will certainly treat it.



It may heal on its own, but if the bones aren't alligned properly it may not, or will be weak. It really should be put in a cast.



Please tell me how it goes!
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#5 Old 01-21-2009, 01:04 PM
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The problem with going to a vet is that will cost money, which I don't think dad would be willing to do. The fawn has come fairly close to us before, but doesn't completely trust us, so getting it to be transported would be hard too.
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#6 Old 01-21-2009, 01:20 PM
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Are there any licensed wildlife rehabilitation volunteers in your area? I think whatever state agency is in charge of wildlife management in your area would keep a contact file of such people.

"Ground Control to Major Tom.... Ground Control to Major Tom...

Take your protein pills and put your helmet on...."

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#7 Old 01-21-2009, 01:30 PM
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Not that I know of, but I will look into it.
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#8 Old 01-21-2009, 01:44 PM
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the trouble with a wildlife sanctuary is that the deer are not wildlife.



They are farmed deer right? A wildlife sanctary would get the deer treated by a vet and returned to the wild... but it would have to come from the wild in the first place.
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#9 Old 01-21-2009, 01:46 PM
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That is a good point. It does seem we'd have to go through a vet ourselves, and dad won't want to pay for that. =/
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#10 Old 01-21-2009, 02:03 PM
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Where is the fawn now? If you are able to get it to a vet, I'd think that some VBers may be willing to help chip in for the costs. I'm not sure what the ramifications of treatment/broken leg, etc. are for returning to the wild though.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#11 Old 01-21-2009, 03:07 PM
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is it one of the ones you are keeping?

you'd need to go through a vet not a wildlife organization since they are farmed/domesticated but if you call a wildlife sanctuary/rehabillitator they can probably give you information on what you can do to help the fawn. it may be possible to cast the leg yourself if the bone doesn't need to be set and provided that you can catch it. seperate it from any adults and block them into seperate pens before you try to approach it, from what i've heard deer can be very vicious when protecting their young.

they should be able to explain to you how to tell if the bone is in place properly. if it is not you will need a vet to set it, the wildlife folks probably work with local vets who volunteer their time to help them, so they will know which vets in town specialize with large animals and wildlife such as deer.

they may tell you otherwise (they're the experts not me) but generally with most timid animals if you cover their faces with a towel or something so they can't see what's going on they will be a little calmer and struggle less.

I'm singin' here to get rid of fear
Hope it disappears right here with the rain
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Meaningless to pray, so just goin' on my way
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#12 Old 01-21-2009, 03:53 PM
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Argh- Sorry, Larissa- I missed the part that these are domesticated deer (fallow deer, maybe?). A wildlife rehabber might have some experience to help you, but I don't know. You mentioned that your folks might not want to shell out a lot of money for the fawn's care, and I'm not sure how expensive a large animal vet might be...

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#13 Old 01-21-2009, 07:04 PM
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They are red deer. The fawn is with the others we are keeping. There are four adults, and three fawns, including the injured one.

I don't think the leg is really in place, since it's apparently just hanging. I haven't had a proper look, but that's what my dad says. He really doesn't care enough to think it worth getting a vet to see it, since it would be a hard job catching it, and rather expensive. His other option of letting a guy we know come out and shoot it would look better to him, since there's no cost involved there.
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#14 Old 01-21-2009, 10:11 PM
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I'm not really sure, but there is a white tailed deer (wild) who lives around here, and she had a broken leg that healed wrong, so she has a limp when she walks, but she can run fast if need be. She's been around for many years and has fawns every spring.
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#15 Old 01-21-2009, 11:09 PM
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My mum says that she saw the fawn limping on the leg, like putting a little weight on it. Could this be a good sign? It was carrying it before, putting no weight on it.
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#16 Old 01-21-2009, 11:19 PM
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Could be bad, could be good. Normally when an animal breaks a leg they shouldn't put weight on it for a while, however if she's putting a bit of weight on it that might mean its not hurting her to do so.



Just keep your eye on her, if it heals on its own thats fine but she might have a limp for the rest of her life, just make sure she doesn't get sick or the leg gets infected.
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#17 Old 01-22-2009, 12:28 AM
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I'm definitely keeping a close eye on her.



I missed the question before about whether we are keeping it. We are not sure about the three fawns, we aren't meant to keep them, but I don't think the owner will want to pay for them to be transported, and we won't pay him for them, so we don't know yet.

The injured one may be a different case anyway, though, since he may not want to bother with it.
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#18 Old 02-04-2009, 12:41 AM
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Just updating here... So far we have just left the fawn, and it seems to be going well. We did some research and found that often an injured deer will be turned away by the other deer, but this fawn has been staying close and not excluded. He's been eating fine too. Just doing a fair amount of sitting down to keep off the leg.
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#19 Old 02-04-2009, 01:05 AM
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The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#20 Old 02-04-2009, 03:52 AM
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Sorry to hear about the poor fawn! Two years ago I had a deer that was coming to my yard with a broken leg. I called our local rehab facility and the advice they gave me was that they won't do anything to help an injured deer. Of course, the deer around here are not domesticated...I'm afaid I don't know much about domesticated vs. wild deer, especially since it doesn't sound like the domesticated deer are really tame or anything.



Anyway, the reason the rehabilitator said they don't do anything is because trying to catch a deer is so traumatizing to the animal that they feel the deer could do more harm to itself. This was a rather large, adult deer...it came around for a few days and then I didn't see it anymore so I don't know what happened to it. I hope you have good luck with the fawn though...keep us posted!

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#21 Old 02-04-2009, 07:18 PM
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I certainly know it's traumatizing catching deer. In our first attempt to catch them the older stag we had got in a panic and was running up and down the fence line, as though he didn't realise the fence was there. He grazed his shoulder rather badly and there was blood smeared on the fence. Very sad and upsetting to watch. And, the fawn broke its leg when we were trying to catch them all again.
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