Spayed dog--how long til hormone levels normalize? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 12-05-2005, 10:14 PM
 
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My foster husky was just spayed a couple weeks ago and now she's "mothering" anything she can get a hold of. At first I thought she was just being bossy and trying to guard food and toys from my husky, so I put all the toys and bones in a closet. She then made a dog leash her "puppy" and drug it into her cage. (Really my husky's cage, but she took it over and kicked him out of it.)



I was just wondering how long this type of behavior usually lasts. Since it looks like I'll be keeping her a while, since the only people who've been interested in her want to keep her tied up outside, I'd like to introduce her to my female dogs. But I definitely don't want to try that while she's feeling motherly toward just about every object. It will be a difficult enough task as it is but I'd like to try if I have to keep this dog several months.
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#2 Old 12-06-2005, 06:53 AM
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My parents had a dog who exhibited this type of behovior right after spaying. She was mothering her squeaky toys. Since she was still a pup, we were able to get her over the hump by first admiring her "babes" and cuddling them, and then squeaking them, and then finally throwing them and reminding her that they were really toys and fun to play with. She was back to normal after a few games of catch.

It is our choices that show what we truly are far more than our abilities. ~A. Dumbledore
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#3 Old 12-06-2005, 09:16 AM
 
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Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!
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#4 Old 12-06-2005, 10:19 AM
 
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Our male dog went through a puppyish-humping everything kind of phase right after he got neutered at around 5 yrs, but it only lasted about two weeks or so, then he acted just as old as he always had.
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#5 Old 12-06-2005, 02:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie26 View Post

Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!



If the procedure was done correctly (meaning the ovaries were removed), you will not see any signs of heat. Those signs are due to increasing estrogen levels, which is produced by developing follicles (cells around the egg) in the ovaries.



The half-life of hormones, expecially sex ones, is very short and will be out of the system within a couple of days or less. What takes time is for the brain to reprogram itself after being under the influence. The hormones cause certain parts of the brain to become active and this is often done with increased blood flow and such. It may take a couple of days for some dogs or it could take a few weeks in others. In dogs especially, the hormones cause the dog to learn certain behaviors (by making certain areas of the brain active) and the lack of hormone does not "unlearn" the behavior. This is why many mating behaviors do not go away with altering, like wandering in males. You need to teach some dogs to change their behavior. Does this make sense or have I throughly confused you? Cat mating behavior is often almost totally hormone related and neutering stops it.



The mothering behavior is hormone related (elevated progesterone) and does go away after spaying or the progesterone producing cells (corpra lutea) goes away about 180 days after heat. It's an interesting part of pack life that helps ensure survival of the pups produced by the alpha female.
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#6 Old 12-06-2005, 02:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie26 View Post

Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!



If the procedure was done correctly (meaning the ovaries were removed), you will not see any signs of heat. Those signs are due to increasing estrogen levels, which is produced by developing follicles (cells around the egg) in the ovaries.



The half-life of hormones, expecially sex ones, is very short and will be out of the system within a couple of days or less. What takes time is for the brain to reprogram itself after being under the influence. The hormones cause certain parts of the brain to become active and this is often done with increased blood flow and such. It may take a couple of days for some dogs or it could take a few weeks in others. In dogs especially, the hormones cause the dog to learn certain behaviors (by making certain areas of the brain active) and the lack of hormone does not "unlearn" the behavior. This is why many mating behaviors do not go away with altering, like wandering in males. You need to teach some dogs to change their behavior. Does this make sense or have I throughly confused you? Cat mating behavior is often almost totally hormone related and neutering stops it.



The mothering behavior is hormone related (elevated progesterone) and does go away after spaying or the progesterone producing cells (corpra lutea) goes away about 180 days after heat. It's an interesting part of pack life that helps ensure survival of the pups produced by the alpha female.
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#7 Old 12-06-2005, 02:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie26 View Post

Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!



If the procedure was done correctly (meaning the ovaries were removed), you will not see any signs of heat. Those signs are due to increasing estrogen levels, which is produced by developing follicles (cells around the egg) in the ovaries.



The half-life of hormones, expecially sex ones, is very short and will be out of the system within a couple of days or less. What takes time is for the brain to reprogram itself after being under the influence. The hormones cause certain parts of the brain to become active and this is often done with increased blood flow and such. It may take a couple of days for some dogs or it could take a few weeks in others. In dogs especially, the hormones cause the dog to learn certain behaviors (by making certain areas of the brain active) and the lack of hormone does not "unlearn" the behavior. This is why many mating behaviors do not go away with altering, like wandering in males. You need to teach some dogs to change their behavior. Does this make sense or have I throughly confused you? Cat mating behavior is often almost totally hormone related and neutering stops it.



The mothering behavior is hormone related (elevated progesterone) and does go away after spaying or the progesterone producing cells (corpra lutea) goes away about 180 days after heat. It's an interesting part of pack life that helps ensure survival of the pups produced by the alpha female.
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#8 Old 12-06-2005, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie26 View Post

Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!



If the procedure was done correctly (meaning the ovaries were removed), you will not see any signs of heat. Those signs are due to increasing estrogen levels, which is produced by developing follicles (cells around the egg) in the ovaries.



The half-life of hormones, expecially sex ones, is very short and will be out of the system within a couple of days or less. What takes time is for the brain to reprogram itself after being under the influence. The hormones cause certain parts of the brain to become active and this is often done with increased blood flow and such. It may take a couple of days for some dogs or it could take a few weeks in others. In dogs especially, the hormones cause the dog to learn certain behaviors (by making certain areas of the brain active) and the lack of hormone does not "unlearn" the behavior. This is why many mating behaviors do not go away with altering, like wandering in males. You need to teach some dogs to change their behavior. Does this make sense or have I throughly confused you? Cat mating behavior is often almost totally hormone related and neutering stops it.



The mothering behavior is hormone related (elevated progesterone) and does go away after spaying or the progesterone producing cells (corpra lutea) goes away about 180 days after heat. It's an interesting part of pack life that helps ensure survival of the pups produced by the alpha female.
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#9 Old 12-06-2005, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie26 View Post

Hi Wolfie - so you made a decision on the spaying? When I got Rube spayed the vet said that might happen as the hormones remain in the blood stream. He said she might have symptoms of the season/heat when its due, but (obviously no bleeding). Rube got back to normal fairly quickly and she's better than ever at the moment!



If the procedure was done correctly (meaning the ovaries were removed), you will not see any signs of heat. Those signs are due to increasing estrogen levels, which is produced by developing follicles (cells around the egg) in the ovaries.



The half-life of hormones, expecially sex ones, is very short and will be out of the system within a couple of days or less. What takes time is for the brain to reprogram itself after being under the influence. The hormones cause certain parts of the brain to become active and this is often done with increased blood flow and such. It may take a couple of days for some dogs or it could take a few weeks in others. In dogs especially, the hormones cause the dog to learn certain behaviors (by making certain areas of the brain active) and the lack of hormone does not "unlearn" the behavior. This is why many mating behaviors do not go away with altering, like wandering in males. You need to teach some dogs to change their behavior. Does this make sense or have I throughly confused you? Cat mating behavior is often almost totally hormone related and neutering stops it.



The mothering behavior is hormone related (elevated progesterone) and does go away after spaying or the progesterone producing cells (corpra lutea) goes away about 180 days after heat. It's an interesting part of pack life that helps ensure survival of the pups produced by the alpha female.
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#10 Old 12-07-2005, 09:57 AM
 
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I understood part of that, cheekywhiskers. Not all, but some.



I was just reading that spaying during a "false pregnancy" can actually make it last longer. Wonderful. I know our vet has never recommended spaying while in heat, but since this dog was running around loose while in heat, I did it anyway.



I know he does take the ovaries with spays.



Oh well. It's not that annoying really. I just can't even attempt to introduce her to my girls while she's protecting everything in sight.
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#11 Old 12-08-2005, 09:57 AM
 
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i don't know if it's the same for boys & girls but Doogie didn't completely calm down for about 6months after he was castrated.
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