vegetarian german shepherd...? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-27-2010, 08:53 AM
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hi guys...

i've always been fascinated by german shepherd, they're cute, adorable, smart, strong, obedient, etc etc...

since i want to treat him like a part of the family i want him to be a vegetarian... i'd train him to get used to vegs and fruits slowly since young, and hopefully, he'll turn vegetarian~



i have a vegetarian friend, who said her dog (golden retriever) is also a vegetarian... she said her dog's fur becomes more beautiful, and becomes tamer...



however i've been doing some research, and some sites say that dogs shouldn't be given vegetables or fruits... it'd be fatal and such... or doesn't suit their nutrition needs...

omg is this true?

especially since the dog i desire is a big one... >_<



thanks...



one more thing... is it true that dogs such as german shepherd could die if water enter their ears??? O_O
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#2 Old 03-27-2010, 09:08 AM
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My dogs have been vegetarian for many years. I've used Nature's Recipe veg dog food and it's worked well. I had a Great Pyrenees and he weighed in at around 105lbs. He lived to be about 12 which is quite old for a dog that size.

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#3 Old 03-27-2010, 09:41 AM
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My dogs have been vegetarian for many years. I've used Nature's Recipe veg dog food and it's worked well. I had a Great Pyrenees and he weighed in at around 105lbs. He lived to be about 12 which is quite old for a dog that size.



My Sophie (Great Pyrenees), at 115 pounds, lived to 14 1/2 on an omni, largely carnivore diet. I'm saying this not to say that a vegetarian diet can't be a healthy diet for a dog, just that it's not necessarily healthier than a good omni diet. Sophie's blood tests at the end showed organ function that one would expect of a relatively young dog - if it weren't for her hips, she could have gone on for years.



To the OP - it sounds as though you know practically nothing about dogs. GSDs are not for the novice dog person; no highly intelligent dog is; it would not be fair to the dog or to you for you to get a GSD. You need to thoroughly educate yourself, and then adopt a dog who is an easier dog for someoe like you. Start out by volunteering at your local shelter.
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#4 Old 03-27-2010, 09:48 AM
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To the OP: I just realized that you're the one who got rid of his fish because they didn't suit your room.



DO NOT GET ANOTHER ANIMAL, ever!!! It would be a crime for a German Shepherd or any other dog to have to rely on you.
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#5 Old 03-27-2010, 09:59 AM
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My Sophie (Great Pyrenees), at 115 pounds, lived to 14 1/2 on an omni, largely carnivore diet. I'm saying this not to say that a vegetarian diet can't be a healthy diet for a dog, just that it's not necessarily healthier than a good omni diet. Sophie's blood tests at the end showed organ function that one would expect of a relatively young dog - if it weren't for her hips, she could have gone on for years.





He was doing well and could've gone on even longer except he got bone cancer in his leg that was rapidly spreading everywhere.

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#6 Old 03-27-2010, 06:36 PM
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Bone cancer is an awful thing, and always seems to progress even faster than the vet's initial prognosis. I'm so sorry. If your guy was anything like our Sophie, you were really lucky to have him in your life; I know we were, with Sophie.
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#7 Old 03-27-2010, 07:54 PM
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To the OP: I just realized that you're the one who got rid of his fish because they didn't suit your room.



DO NOT GET ANOTHER ANIMAL, ever!!! It would be a crime for a German Shepherd or any other dog to have to rely on you.



dude... will you get over it?

its not really like that... i didn't treat my animal as ornaments... seeesh...

and do you think getting rid of them is my own will? no! i'm forced to do it! and it breaks my heart!

careful what you say if you didn't know anything about me...
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#8 Old 03-27-2010, 07:59 PM
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Bone cancer is an awful thing, and always seems to progress even faster than the vet's initial prognosis. I'm so sorry. If your guy was anything like our Sophie, you were really lucky to have him in your life; I know we were, with Sophie.



He was great! I'm not so sure we'll get another large dog (maybe a Burmese), but they're sooo smart and independent. I've been having dreams with him in them lately and it's hard. I miss him.

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#9 Old 03-27-2010, 08:07 PM
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my friend has a german shepherd with hip displacement. the dog had two surgeries, and then she and the doctor decided to leave her as is to develop muscle around the bones. she carpeted her whole house and re-did some rooms to make it easier for the dog to walk around. i don't know a lot about german shepherds, but she was told this is not terribly uncommon. so if you are looking for a big dog like a shepherd, you need to be prepared for dealing with the expense and decisions that have to be made in case your dog happens to have something like this.



i didn't read your fish thread, but if you were forced to get rid of your fish, is it possible you would be forced to get rid of a german shepherd with health issues? it is sometimes difficult to tell at the beginning that these issues will develop. i'm not saying you can't take care of a dog or anything like that (i don't know you at all), just that i have seen someone whose life revolves around the dogs she cares for spending WAY more time and money than originally intended. the only other choice for her would have been to give up on the dog, and there is no way she would have considered that. it is that kind of commitment you need to make when you adopt a big dog like that. (any dog, but with a shepherd, it is way more difficult to find a new owner if it turns out you are unable to care for it.) sorry if i misread anything. i'm not talking about you in particular. there is no way i could care for a german shepherd right now with what's going on in my life, although i think they are gorgeous animals.

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#10 Old 03-27-2010, 08:08 PM
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Not to dwell on the past but the other thread of yours was disturbing, so having a pet, ESPECIALLY a large loud dog who requires lots of attention/time/money sounds a bit daunting for you. And if you are going to have a veggie pet you should probably do a bit of research. FYI dogs can eat veggies but there are specific veggies toxic to many animals and dogs. Avocado, onion, garlic just to name a few.



But I stress you shouldn't take on such a task as a german shepard, especially since you said you don't have much time for your pet. It's just...if you can't handle a fish what makes you think a huge dog is any easier? And dogs are very intelligent and emotional, you can't just get rid of them if they mess up your feng shui....it's abusive

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#11 Old 03-27-2010, 08:28 PM
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look... everyone... we're really getting off topic here...



that feng shui thing... was a thing in the past...

alright, i'll say it: i'm a FOOL for going to that extreme... happy?

everyone made mistakes, so i can't have another chance just because i made one?



i didn't say i'm going to get them now... i'll only get them IF i have the time... i just meant that i'm interested in them...

also i forgot to say: even if they don't become a full vegetarian, i still cherish them... i know i shouldn't force anyone to follow what i believe...



i CAN actually take care of fish... and right now i still kept my aquarium and moved on with another fish... and hey, there's no problem anymore...

again, its not feng shui...

will everyone get over it? i was confused and depressed back then so i posted that without further thinking...
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#12 Old 03-27-2010, 08:32 PM
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I'll agree that you need to learn a lot more about dogs before you get one, but be careful of what you read and believe from websites. Some of them are written by people who think they know tons about dogs in general because they've grown up with them their entire lives or maybe their MIL breeds them or they worked in a pet shop for three weeks. Your best dog care info is going to some from vet based websites, preferably organizations that support a large diverse group of vet rather than a single vet clinic. Those sites have to make sure their info is based on current research and not just current popular opinion, otherwise they'll hear about it from the vets correcting them!!! Another good rule of thumb is to weigh confliciting advice, which side is supported more and who's doing the supporting.



Having said that, dogs are geaneralists in terms of nutrition, they can eat a wide varieties of food and still be healthy. There's nothing specifically in meat that they require. Animal based proteins do have a different amino acid ratios than plants and the tend to have higher amounts of essential ones, but, just like with humans, the right mixture of plant proteins will provide adequate amino acids amounts. Being more generalists, dogs have a better ability to detoxify plant toxins than cats, but not as good as humans and so might accumulate more damage from the toxins than a human on the same diet.



So, you could have a healthy vegetarian dog, now the question is:do you want to cook for your dog or do you want prepackaged? Homemade diets need to be watched carefully to avoid nutritional defiencies and excesses, they are also time consuming to prepare. Commercial diets should already be complete and balanced, and therefore require less work, but may also contain stuff you don't want to feed your pet, like preservatives and compounds to balance the diet. I've seen a few veg dogs and some are super healthy and others not so healthy. In short, how they do, depends on the dog.



As far as GSD's do, they require more dedication to train. They are bred to be intelligent and dominant. This translates to a dog that gets bored easily and may try to spice things up on their own by inventing new games or getting into trouble. Some of them tend to be fearful and are more likely to be fear biters if not trained properly. GSD's also have lots of health problems, not just hip dysplasia, but also djd, spinal cord demyelinatation (degeneration of spinal cord causing paralysis), bloat, and others. I've seen too many who have problems with allergies. The thing with water in the ears is far fetched. They can get ear infections from frequent/persisitant water in the ears, but they won't die from it (unless you let it get really, really bad and even then...). If you really want a GSD, I would recommend actually getting a mix of one, they're much healthier in general.
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#13 Old 03-27-2010, 08:35 PM
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i'm leaving your fish out of it and just saying that for **anyone**, taking care of a a german shepherd, or any other (especially large) dog with potential health issues that may require time and expense far beyond ordinary dog care, it is a really huge decision and you need to make sure you are able to offer an environment where such an animal can thrive. i have two dogs here at home, and i know i would not be able to make such a commitment to a german shepherd right now. so it's nothing personal; looking into getting a german shepherd is a really huge commitment.

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#14 Old 03-31-2010, 10:10 PM
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Reading your fish thread, I could never recommend you get any animal.
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#15 Old 04-01-2010, 04:14 AM
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Dogs are like toddlers.. they need tons and tons of attention.
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#16 Old 04-01-2010, 04:39 AM
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German Shepherds are intelligent creatures, and require a LOT of time and energy. Think about a furry infant that will spend two years of its life probably crapping and gnawing all over your house. Then spend the next thirteen years or so being utterly dependent on you. It's like having a child that NEVER grows up. Think really, really, really, really hard about whether you're ready for that kind of commitment before you get a dog.



Also - I think dogs and cats should be kept on a high protein diet (aka high-meat diet) but that's just my opinion.
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#17 Old 04-01-2010, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
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......Think about a furry infant that will spend two years of its life probably crapping and gnawing all over your house. Then spend the next thirteen years or so being utterly dependent on you. It's like having a child that NEVER grows up.....

Quoted for truth.



Mondo, I love dogs just as much as I love the cats and rabbits I've adopted, but I don't think I could manage one at the moment.



First off, I would most likely adopt a rather large dog because those are the ones who are difficult to find homes for. I normally use the bus to get around, but would not be able to do that with my dog- s/he wouldn't fit into a pet carrier, as the bus regulations require (except for service/seeing eye dogs). I'd probably worry about my smaller animals being safe around the dog when I was not home.

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