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#1 Old 11-10-2009, 06:34 AM
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Help! I'm in an apartment and my dog has had 4 accidents in just over a month. We take her out literally right before we go to bed and right after we wake up. This week alone she's had 2 accidents. Any suggestions? I was thinking about taking her water away after a certain time at night. I just read online that rewarding her in the morning for no accidents is good, but I know for a fact she would have no idea what she was being rewarded for. She's not a puppy, she's about 7 or 8 and she's never had this problem before (to be fair, she was an outside dog before and only slept inside a few times a month).



Thanks!
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#2 Old 11-10-2009, 06:44 AM
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Can she sleep in your room? Maybe if you heard her getting up at night, you could take her out.



Our dog was an outside dog when we got him. He was NUTS until he got the hang of being in the house. He's perfect now, there's hope. Hang in there.
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#3 Old 11-10-2009, 07:32 AM
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Changes in elimination behavior like that always warent a vet visit. You should plan on a full exam, urinalysis and possibly bloodwork. I hope it's easily treatable and nothing serious. As long as your pup get free access to fresh water throughout the day, you should be safe with picking it up at 6-7pm until you get her to a vet. If this is a condition like diabetes, kidney failure, cushings, etc where the problem is excess urine production, she may not be able to drink enough to compensate for water loss. If the problem is a bladder infection or stones or increased water consumption, she should be ok with limited water at night.
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#4 Old 11-10-2009, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Treehugger267 View Post

Can she sleep in your room? Maybe if you heard her getting up at night, you could take her out.



Our dog was an outside dog when we got him. He was NUTS until he got the hang of being in the house. He's perfect now, there's hope. Hang in there.



She can't for 2 reasons: She's being treated for fleas (scratches like crazy) and she's restless at night, she'll keep me up (I'm a very light sleeper). I had her sleeping in my room at one point when I lived with my Mom and she would wake me up about 10 times each night. When I lived in Cali, she would always wait to be taken out, she never had accidents (even when it rained and she'd refuse to go out after being in for 12 hours). I'm just confused as to why she's picking up her bad habits this week. We take her for walks numerous times a day and she gets nothing but love from me since I'm home all day. She gets treats and always have food and clean water. Do you think this could be more than just accidents, something deeper?
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#5 Old 11-10-2009, 07:33 AM
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Changes in elimination behavior like that always warent a vet visit. You should plan on a full exam, urinalysis and possibly bloodwork. I hope it's easily treatable and nothing serious. As long as your pup get free access to fresh water throughout the day, you should be safe with picking it up at 6-7pm until you get her to a vet. If this is a condition like diabetes, kidney failure, cushings, etc where the problem is excess urine production, she may not be able to drink enough to compensate for water loss. If the problem is a bladder infection or stones or increased water consumption, she should be ok with limited water at night.



That's a very good idea, thanks!! I'll try to get her in soon.
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#6 Old 11-10-2009, 07:54 AM
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I was thinking about taking her water away after a certain time at night.



This would probably help with your problem, or leave down a few ice cubes in a bowl instead of water. I withhold water from my dog at night to prevent night-time accidents and he has no problems with it - within a few days he just got used to getting a drink right before bed and first thing after a morning pee. *shrug*
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#7 Old 11-10-2009, 07:58 AM
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If her last pee at night is around 11 or 12, when do you suggest I take the water away?
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#8 Old 11-10-2009, 08:03 AM
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I always just take the dog's water away right after I take him out for the last time at night, and before I go to bed. In your case I'd probably replace the dog's water with a bowl of ice cubes around 9 or after dinner - the ice will provide enough water to sate thirst until morning, and if you leave water out for the dog all day, they're not going to be dehydrated.
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#9 Old 11-10-2009, 08:52 AM
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I always just take the dog's water away right after I take him out for the last time at night, and before I go to bed. In your case I'd probably replace the dog's water with a bowl of ice cubes around 9 or after dinner - the ice will provide enough water to sate thirst until morning, and if you leave water out for the dog all day, they're not going to be dehydrated.



Gotcha, thanks! I'll give that a shot too.
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#10 Old 11-10-2009, 10:47 AM
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Cheekywhiskers is a vet; as she said, I'd be careful about limiting access to water until you determine what's going on with her medically. Depending on what that is, you may make a sick dog sicker.
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#11 Old 11-10-2009, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by cheekywhiskers View Post

changes in elimination behavior like that always warent a vet visit. You should plan on a full exam, urinalysis and possibly bloodwork. I hope it's easily treatable and nothing serious. As long as your pup get free access to fresh water throughout the day, you should be safe with picking it up at 6-7pm until you get her to a vet. If this is a condition like diabetes, kidney failure, cushings, etc where the problem is excess urine production, she may not be able to drink enough to compensate for water loss. If the problem is a bladder infection or stones or increased water consumption, she should be ok with limited water at night.



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#12 Old 11-10-2009, 12:45 PM
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Cheekywhiskers is a vet; as she said, I'd be careful about limiting access to water until you determine what's going on with her medically. Depending on what that is, you may make a sick dog sicker.



She doesn't drink a ton, nothing above average, I doubt she really has anything wrong with her. My bf is planning on making a vet appointment when he gets home tonight.
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#13 Old 11-10-2009, 01:03 PM
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Is your dog having full accidents or is it more like she is leaking a little bit of urine? As female dogs age the estrogen diminishing can cause this urine leakage, but you really should get her a urinalysis as she may have a urinary tract infection. Good luck!
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#14 Old 11-10-2009, 01:11 PM
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She doesn't drink a ton, nothing above average, I doubt she really has anything wrong with her. My bf is planning on making a vet appointment when he gets home tonight.



Dogs and cats don't drink more than usual when they have UTI's, kidney problems, or any number of other medical problems that can lead to changes in elimination behaviors, so the fact that she hasn't icreased her water intake is not a reliable indicator of health at all.



In fact, the only condition that any of mine have had where they drank more than usual has been diabetes.
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#15 Old 11-10-2009, 06:48 PM
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She doesn't drink a ton, nothing above average, I doubt she really has anything wrong with her. My bf is planning on making a vet appointment when he gets home tonight.



I've heard this one before and sometimes (not always) when the amount is measured, the pet really is drinking more. A UTI can cause an increase in thirst, but withholding water doesn't cause dehydration since the kideys are still working fine (just means your pet is less comfortable). If the condition is early, your pet may still be able to drink enough to compensate. So for a few days bofore you get into your vet, you can limit the water at night, but you want to pick it up an hour or two before her last trip outside. If your dog is normally hydrated, it can take that long to fully process and eliminate extra water. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
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#16 Old 11-11-2009, 04:00 PM
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Awww.. poor Sweet Pea (and mommy who has to clean up the mess). I don't know very much about dogs, but maybe she's going through an adjustment phase? Hope everything's OK. Keep us posted.
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#17 Old 11-11-2009, 10:46 PM
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Yep, a move to a new place could cause it. Of course have medical reasons ruled out, especially since she's 8 years old.
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#18 Old 11-12-2009, 10:04 AM
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Is your dog having full accidents or is it more like she is leaking a little bit of urine? As female dogs age the estrogen diminishing can cause this urine leakage, but you really should get her a urinalysis as she may have a urinary tract infection. Good luck!



Full accidents. She hasn't had one since I last reported one, which is good.



Quote:
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Dogs and cats don't drink more than usual when they have UTI's, kidney problems, or any number of other medical problems that can lead to changes in elimination behaviors, so the fact that she hasn't icreased her water intake is not a reliable indicator of health at all.



In fact, the only condition that any of mine have had where they drank more than usual has been diabetes.



My poor doggy I hope nothing is wrong with her.



Quote:
Originally Posted by cheekywhiskers View Post

I've heard this one before and sometimes (not always) when the amount is measured, the pet really is drinking more. A UTI can cause an increase in thirst, but withholding water doesn't cause dehydration since the kideys are still working fine (just means your pet is less comfortable). If the condition is early, your pet may still be able to drink enough to compensate. So for a few days bofore you get into your vet, you can limit the water at night, but you want to pick it up an hour or two before her last trip outside. If your dog is normally hydrated, it can take that long to fully process and eliminate extra water. Good luck and let us know how it goes.



Her water bowl is pretty small and I monitor how much she drinks and how often I fill it up in a day. She backwashes too, so I'm always cleaning it out.



Thanks Things have been crazy here, so we haven't made an appointment yet, but when my guy comes home from work today, we're calling. I'm new to the area, so I'm still doing research on who's the best around. I'm also looking for someone who can care for rabbits too, my bunny has a runny eye. Maybe we can get them seen in 1 visit, that would be great.



I will definitely report back.
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#19 Old 11-12-2009, 10:06 AM
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Sedona (furkid on right in my avatar wearing santa hat) has urinary incontinence (diagnosed earlier this year); she will be 7 next month. She started leaking while sleeping; we would notice a damp spot and her "pants" (she is a long coat gsd so the fluffy fur on her back legs I call her pants) would be wet. Sometimes if she woke up quickly and jumped up she would dribble a little. We took her to the vets and after testing felt she had this kind of UI:



"Hormone-responsive incontinence occurs in neutered dogs of both sexes and occasionally in spayed female cats but occurs most commonly in female dogs. The pet can urinate normally, but they leak urine while resting. Physical examination and blood and urine tests are usually normal in these pets. Hormone-responsive incontinence can occur months to years after a pet is neutered." From: Urinary Incontinence



She is taking prescription phenylpropanolamine which has helped tremendously.
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#20 Old 11-12-2009, 10:10 AM
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Awww.. poor Sweet Pea (and mommy who has to clean up the mess). I don't know very much about dogs, but maybe she's going through an adjustment phase? Hope everything's OK. Keep us posted.



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Yep, a move to a new place could cause it. Of course have medical reasons ruled out, especially since she's 8 years old.



The thing is, we've been at this apartment for over a month now (since Sep 25th), these behaviors started very recently. She didn't have her first accident until a few weeks after moving in. I'm going to have her seen by a doctor, just to be safe. Worst case, I can try and train her to use a Puppy Pad or something. She's smart, I'm sure with the right training, she can pick up on it.
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#21 Old 11-12-2009, 10:13 AM
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Sedona (furkid on right in my avatar wearing santa hat) has urinary incontinence (diagnosed earlier this year); she will be 7 next month. She started leaking while sleeping; we would notice a damp spot and her "pants" (she is a long coat gsd so the fluffy fur on her back legs I call her pants) would be wet. Sometimes if she woke up quickly and jumped up she would dribble a little. We took her to the vets and after testing felt she had this kind of UI:



"Hormone-responsive incontinence occurs in neutered dogs of both sexes and occasionally in spayed female cats but occurs most commonly in female dogs. The pet can urinate normally, but they leak urine while resting. Physical examination and blood and urine tests are usually normal in these pets. Hormone-responsive incontinence can occur months to years after a pet is neutered." From: Urinary Incontinence



She is taking prescription phenylpropanolamine which has helped tremendously.



That's great that her meds are helping



With Sweet Pea, she actually gets up off her bed at night and pees on the carpet (away from where she sleeps, in a single puddle). She's never leaked before. I'll keep an eye out though, SP is a senior citizen, I know things can change. Give your dogs love for me, they're just too adorable.
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#22 Old 11-17-2009, 02:06 AM
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It is a fallacy that withholding water makes a pup stop peeing at night. Withholding water actually makes the pup go into 'drought mode' (so to speak) and therefore it can increase the frequency of urination, making house training more difficult.



Frankly I think it is downright cruel to withhold water over night.



In my job as a vet nurse, I am constantly correcting this myth. Dogs need access to water 24/7. Like the RSPCA, and ASPCA also defined cruelty and neglect partly by not providing access to fresh water at all times. In fact it is against the dog welfare act, for good reason.



Im amazed that anyone on here could advise not allowing access to water - even if it makes the dog uncomfortable, I would never want one of my dogs to be uncomfortable especially if they have an infection!



Would you also do this for an old dog who has become incontinent? I take my dogs on for good or bad and if I need to get up in the night for any of them thats what I do - not just not allow them a drink when they need it
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#23 Old 11-17-2009, 07:21 AM
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I have a question for you, is it cruel to tell a child no more water at bedtime so they don't pee the bed?
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#24 Old 11-17-2009, 08:19 AM
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did you make a vet appointment yet? Hopefully all is well.
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#25 Old 11-17-2009, 09:58 AM
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I haven't found the right vet yet. I have time right now, I'll do some more research
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#26 Old 11-17-2009, 02:58 PM
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I have a question for you, is it cruel to tell a child no more water at bedtime so they don't pee the bed?



IMO yes it is! to say to any human being they are not allowed water is cruel or any animal for that fact.



To deny an animal that may have a kidney infection, urinary tract infectiion to be denied water is down right cruel!



Its my opinion if you want to treat your animals or kids in that way thats up to you I just know which way I would prefer. I do not want my animals to be denied basic rights to have water available to them - you may want to deny your animals and children that its up to you
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#27 Old 11-17-2009, 03:11 PM
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IMO yes it is! to say to any human being they are not allowed water is cruel or any animal for that fact.



To deny an animal that may have a kidney infection, urinary tract infectiion to be denied water is down right cruel!



Its my opinion if you want to treat your animals or kids in that way thats up to you I just know which way I would prefer. I do not want my animals to be denied basic rights to have water available to them - you may want to deny your animals and children that its up to you



Well obviously if the dog is sick, that's not right. I'm not talking about a sick dog though. Everyone here has made it clear that it's important to get the dog medically evaluated first.



You don't have children, do you?



BTW, I don't plan on taking the dogs water away.
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#28 Old 11-17-2009, 03:21 PM
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Well obviously if the dog is sick, that's not right. I'm not talking about a sick dog though. Everyone here has made it clear that it's important to get the dog medically evaluated first.



You don't have children, do you?



BTW, I don't plan on taking the dogs water away.



Sorry I must apologise I thought this was about dogs not children.



I dont however care whether its about dogs or kids its about having access to the basic rights of any animal and that is water.



Ok Im in the UK which I think has different feelings on the welfare of animals and even our Government deems it the right of animals to have access to clean water at all times - I dont know maybe we are backwards in that way? Who knows maybe we are backwards in saying no to shock collars, prong collars etc etc? Each to his own but as I said I would never restrict either my kids or my pet the basic right to drink clean water whenever they need it.
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#29 Old 11-17-2009, 04:32 PM
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Sorry I must apologise I thought this was about dogs not children.



I dont however care whether its about dogs or kids its about having access to the basic rights of any animal and that is water.



Ok Im in the UK which I think has different feelings on the welfare of animals and even our Government deems it the right of animals to have access to clean water at all times - I dont know maybe we are backwards in that way? Who knows maybe we are backwards in saying no to shock collars, prong collars etc etc? Each to his own but as I said I would never restrict either my kids or my pet the basic right to drink clean water whenever they need it.



I've never heard of anyone needing to drink water 24/7. That's a first.
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#30 Old 11-17-2009, 04:41 PM
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Most dogs don't drink water at night anyway, so there isn't an issue. Dogs are like humans, they drink mindlessly too. I've seen my dog get up, go to see the other animals, lay down a bit, walk around more, sniff the table, go sniff her food and water, walk away, come back a minute later and drink for a second and walk away.



In the case of children, they often ask for water to stall having to go to bed, telling them no is not cruelty. Also, if you know the child is peeing the bed at night because they don't have an alarm in their head to wake up and it's giving themselves a rash, then taking away water an hour before bed is not cruel, it's preventing a problem.
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