After being saved from icy waters, dog bites anchorwoman on live t.v. - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
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#1 Old 02-13-2012, 09:57 AM
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1267806.html
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#2 Old 02-13-2012, 11:02 AM
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How sad. I blame the news lady for being so presumptuous.

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#3 Old 02-13-2012, 11:20 AM
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Yeah, my English Setter would snap/bite too if one stuck their face right in his.

Edit to add, I don't blame either the dog nor the newswoman. The owners should have absolutely warned her about the dog's space issues.
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#4 Old 02-13-2012, 11:27 AM
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Can't really call that human-friendly you know.

What if it would've been a small child?

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#5 Old 02-13-2012, 11:35 AM
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Wow, that was sudden. I strongly suspect that dog is with an inadequate owner.

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#6 Old 02-13-2012, 11:38 AM
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There was a follow-up about how to recognize potentially aggressive behavior in dogs here
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/livi...-bitten-by-dog and here http://www.cesarsway.com/newsandeven...n-TV-and-Radio
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#7 Old 02-13-2012, 11:45 AM
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the woman should've known better.

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#8 Old 02-13-2012, 11:50 AM
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I don't blame any of them too much. The dog was in a strange environment with some stranger sticking her face right up in his. And the owner and news lady probably weren't aware how threatening that type of body language can appear to a dog. I'm glad Max isn't going to be killed over this.

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#9 Old 02-13-2012, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Envy View Post

Can't really call that human-friendly you know.

What if it would've been a small child?

Then that child would've hit the lollipop jackpot.

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#10 Old 02-13-2012, 12:02 PM
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the woman should've known better.

No kidding. Even if I spent a half hour petting a strange dog in a strange place, unless the dog reached their head forward by themselves and licked my cheek or nudged me with their nose, I would not have my face right in front of them like that.
Though not completely her fault, I suspect the guy isn't that great of a dog owner, he didn't really react at all when he bit her.

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#11 Old 02-13-2012, 08:46 PM
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That dog sent off all kinds of signals that he was nervous and wanted the anchorwoman to back off, and she didn't listen. Evidently his owner wasn't paying attention either. And if he had really intended to do harm, she wouldn't have a face left. Thankfully last I read he will likely be released back to his owner after the quarantine.
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#12 Old 02-13-2012, 08:52 PM
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Though not completely her fault, I suspect the guy isn't that great of a dog owner, he didn't really react at all when he bit her.

He also had the dog loose, when it didn't have a current rabies vaccine, which is when it chased the coyote and ended up needing rescuing in the first place. So I agree he's probably not the brightest dog owner.
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#13 Old 02-13-2012, 08:54 PM
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Can't really call that human-friendly you know.

What if it would've been a small child?

Won't someone please think of the chillllllldren?!

I learned how to avoid being bitten by a dog at a very young age. One of my nephews could tell you how to approach a dog at 3 years old. People need to teach their kids. And dog owners need to pay attention and teach the kids that parents neglected to teach.
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#14 Old 02-14-2012, 12:17 AM
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Won't someone please think of the chillllllldren?!

I learned how to avoid being bitten by a dog at a very young age. One of my nephews could tell you how to approach a dog at 3 years old. People need to teach their kids. And dog owners need to pay attention and teach the kids that parents neglected to teach.

Maybe 'cause you'd think that pet-dogs would not have an affinity to biting your face unless you did something harmful.

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#15 Old 02-14-2012, 03:32 AM
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That dog sent off all kinds of signals that he was nervous and wanted the anchorwoman to back off, and she didn't listen.

I should start off by saying that I don't know all that much about dogs, being a crazy cat lady myself, but I thought this also while I was watching the video. Of course it could be because I knew what the outcome was going to be so I might have been looking for some sign. But it did kind of look like the dog was saying, 'get off of me'. I see it as an unfortunate incident. Glad the dog is ok and I hope the newswoman will be ok too.

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#16 Old 02-14-2012, 09:09 AM
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Maybe 'cause you'd think that pet-dogs would not have an affinity to biting your face unless you did something harmful.

Yep, a dog who was still likely nervous over being pulled from icy water the day before and is now being bombarded by the sights and smells and sounds of a news set, all foreign things to him, should just know that this stranger meant no harm, even though she was doing all kinds of things that meant "threat" in dog speak. I forgot. It's always the dogs fault. Had the owner not had him so tightly by the collar (while he paid zero attention to the dog's body language), the dog likely would have moved away from the lady and not bitten her. In the dog world, a nip like that means "You missed all my other signals. Now back off." Like I said, if his intent was to attack, she'd have been in much worse shape. Even if you don't know a lot about dog body language, the bared teeth BEFORE he bit her is a sign anyone can read.

If a 3 year old can learn how to approach a dog and how not to be bitten, anyone else should be able to. This was not some aggressive dog that just wanted to attack someone for the hell of it. I read even the woman bitten has said she did not want the dog put down over it.
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#17 Old 02-14-2012, 10:25 AM
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Maybe a year ago, I was at an acquaintance's house. Her husband was holding a very cute, little dog. He seemed to want me to pet the dog, so I said, "Is it okay?" Meaning, your dog likes strangers, right? He assured me yes, but, as soon as I put my hand toward the dog, it tried to bite it off. Luckily, he or she mostly missed, but it still felt like I'd hit my hand with a hammer. The owner was not completely surprised, I could tell. WTF? Do you want to get sued?

I've had labs and now I have a pug. As much as I don't think anything is a dog's "fault" because they are dogs, I would never want to have a dog that you had to worry about biting someone. Nor would I ever want a dog with such a large, lethal mouth (just in case).

The reporter did act stupidly, but we all act stupidly on occasion. It's really sad that the dog bit her right after she told him how beautiful he is.
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#18 Old 02-14-2012, 10:48 AM
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The dog's name (Gladiator Maximus) makes me wonder if he is a fighting dog, or at least a "trophy dog" for someone who cares more about having a tough ego extension than a well-socialized family pet.

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#19 Old 02-14-2012, 01:44 PM
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He was well-socialized enough to send out multiple signals before he nipped, not attacked, her. He didn't bite her until she got right in his face and made direct eye contact. That is a threat in the world of dogs, especially when one is already wound up and nervous and the person doing it is a complete stranger.

I find it both humorous and sad that some people who will defend a serial killer or pedophile are over-reacting on this dog, who showed great bite inhibition for as nervous as he was.

I'll trust a large dog with a "lethal" mouth over most humans any day. It's much easier to predict what a dog will do next.

And a lab could have done just as much damage. Heck, I got bit by a beagle once much harder than this dog bit the news anchor.
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#20 Old 02-14-2012, 04:09 PM
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It is sad the anchor person was not more familiar with canine behavior. I would never put my face that close to a dog's mouth. She looked like she was about to lean in and kiss it on the face, which the most agressive behavior possible to a dog. And dogs strongly dislike being touched on the head. Most "tolerate" it from humans but reliable sources have told me that they really, really hate it. And she is rubbing her hand all over his head and his eyes. The dog gave a "corrective" bite just as he would a pup or another member of the pack that got too close for comfort.

Thanks ElaineV for posting the followup links. (one of them indicates that she was trying to kiss the dog, which is either very stupid or very ignorant, depending on the extent of her knowledge of dogs)
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#21 Old 02-14-2012, 04:49 PM
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I just realized i'm totally in the dark about dogs lol, i always thought of them as supposed to be nice, since all dogs i've ever petted were nice, i've never known about any of these things on how to approach a dog, i could definitely see that this dog wanted to get away though, this is why i like cats more even if they do attack you probably won't end up horribly hurt or dead.
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#22 Old 02-14-2012, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by ElaineV View Post

There was a follow-up about how to recognize potentially aggressive behavior in dogs here
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/livi...-bitten-by-dog and here http://www.cesarsway.com/newsandeven...n-TV-and-Radio

Very informative. Thanks for posting those. I was unaware of some of the facts that were mentioned.

I don't understand why the owner would want to subject the dog to all that attention with the interview after the traumatic event it had just endured. Hell I don't understand how the owner would want to go do an interview after all that. I know I would still be recuperating after having a scare like if it were my dog that almost died.
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#23 Old 02-14-2012, 06:20 PM
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He was well-socialized enough to send out multiple signals before he nipped, not attacked, her. He didn't bite her until she got right in his face and made direct eye contact. That is a threat in the world of dogs, especially when one is already wound up and nervous and the person doing it is a complete stranger.

I find it both humorous and sad that some people who will defend a serial killer or pedophile are over-reacting on this dog, who showed great bite inhibition for as nervous as he was.

I'll trust a large dog with a "lethal" mouth over most humans any day. It's much easier to predict what a dog will do next.

And a lab could have done just as much damage. Heck, I got bit by a beagle once much harder than this dog bit the news anchor.

After I had my lab put to sleep, I learned that most dog bites are from labs. (Because so many people own labs). However, mine would never bite anyone. If they felt threatened, they backed off. If that reporter had put her face in theirs, they would have licked her silly. My pug will gnaw my hand if I hold his feet, but his mouth is so messed up, he can't really hurt me. I'm a lazy dog owner. I only want easy dogs. I wish people like the owner of this dog realized that about themselves, too.
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#24 Old 02-14-2012, 06:31 PM
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On my first day of kindergarten, I was severely bitten around my eye by a Chihuahua that I had bent down to kiss.

It is our choices that show what we truly are far more than our abilities. ~A. Dumbledore
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#25 Old 02-14-2012, 06:56 PM
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I was bitten doing the same thing, in the first grade. Luckily, the scar above my lip is tiny. Could have been bad. Probably why I don't want a dog who will bite.
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#26 Old 02-14-2012, 08:25 PM
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After I had my lab put to sleep, I learned that most dog bites are from labs. (Because so many people own labs). However, mine would never bite anyone. If they felt threatened, they backed off. If that reporter had put her face in theirs, they would have licked her silly. My pug will gnaw my hand if I hold his feet, but his mouth is so messed up, he can't really hurt me. I'm a lazy dog owner. I only want easy dogs. I wish people like the owner of this dog realized that about themselves, too.

That dog wanted to back off but the owner had him too tightly by the collar so he couldn't move away.

If I was a dog, I would bite. I can't stand people I don't know in my personal space.
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#27 Old 02-15-2012, 01:17 AM
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My labs would not have felt threatened by her face, but if she had done something to make them feel threatened, they would have put up with it, maybe cried out, jumped into my lap, but definitely not bit. That dog didn't even give a warning growl. Why not?
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#28 Old 02-15-2012, 06:59 AM
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My thought is, is that anyone who would get a big and relatively rare breed traditionally used for fighting and hunting, and name him "Gladiator Maximus", is probably not the ideal dog owner.

"Gladiator Maximus" is not exactly a family pet name. It soulds remarkably like something you'd see on one of those "bloodline" charts the dogfighters love so much.

If I had to guess, I'd imagine this dog's owner is somebody with an ego problem, who needs to use a "tough"-looking dog to feel better about themselves. Unlike the Dogo Argentino, such is a common breed of human.

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#29 Old 02-15-2012, 07:04 AM
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On my first day of kindergarten, I was severely bitten around my eye by a Chihuahua that I had bent down to kiss.

That story isn't funny obviously but I laughed as it didn't seem to put you off them.
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#30 Old 02-15-2012, 01:21 PM
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The dog's name (Gladiator Maximus) makes me wonder if he is a fighting dog, or at least a "trophy dog" for someone who cares more about having a tough ego extension than a well-socialized family pet.

eh, could just be a reference to his size. I had a rather large rottweiler that we renamed Maximus once we adopted him, and he was one of the sweetest dogs I've ever seen.

Wake up your generation! Wake up and save the nation! Wake up determination! I am afraid we're going down, Afraid we're going down in flames...
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