Marathoning Veggie - VeggieBoards

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#1 Old 01-12-2016, 11:39 AM
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Marathoning Veggie



What does it take to run 26.2 miles? A lot of training, fortitude and the right nutrition. Running gurus stress the importance of protein when training for a marathon, but often suggest animal-based sources as a means of getting it. Living vegetarian or vegan doesn’t mean you have to forsake your love of running: it just means you may have to get creative with your pre-run menus.

The Protein Problem - And Why It Isn’t

Your body needs protein to build muscle, which is crucial to having the stamina and strength necessary to run a marathon. If your body doesn’t get enough protein while engaging in high-energy activities like training for a marathon, it’ll pull protein from your muscles to burn as extra energy. If you’re eating a nutritionally solid diet, you probably get all the protein you need to maintain your body’s muscle mass with enough left to spare to build up some extra muscle.

Aside from maintaining and building muscle, the reason many fitness and running experts tout protein as the way to go when training for a marathon is because it’s one of the densest forms of caloric energy: a little bit of protein carries the same amount of potential energy as a larger amount of energy from carbohydrates. Simply put: you’d have to eat more pieces of toast to get the same amount of energy as a glob of peanut butter.

Potential energy from protein is also processed differently by the body than potential energy from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are easily broken down and consumed by the body, whereas protein is more of a long, slow burn. When you’re training for a marathon without using animal-based food sources, you need to eat more frequently to compensate for that lack of slow burning energy.

What to Eat Before Running

Vegan and vegetarian runners can listen to the running experts on this one: carbohydrates are where it’s at. Carb-loading, the process of eating extra carbohydrates before engaging in strenuous physical activity, is the best way for vegans and vegetarians to get the energy needed to run a marathon.

The type of carbohydrates you eat matter. Sugars from fruit provide a quick jolt of energy, while some runners find that the carbohydrates found in starchy grains like bread are too bulky on their stomach to allow them to run comfortably.

Many vegetarian and vegan runners, like Alina Zavatsky of Vegan Runner Eats, swear by dates as the perfect pre-marathon meal. A handful of dates provides all the energy you’ll need to run the first 5 to 10 miles. Supplement the dates with a little bit of protein and extra sugar from peanut butter (or eggs, if you’re a vegetarian and not a vegan).

What Vegans and Vegetarians Eat While Running

Most marathoners need to eat while running: it’s just a fact of life. But veggie marathoners really need to keep their energy up while in the middle of a marathon. Again, dates are recommended for their quick energy jolt: some veggie and vegan runners even make their own energy paste or “goo” by mixing a source of protein, carbohydrates, potassium and electrolytes – which is basically protein, sugar, potassium and salt. Peanut butter, date syrup, molasses and salt are good foundations of a squeezable goo you can grab and go on your marathon.

Other options for mid-marathon snacking include fruit leather and salted raisins. Anything that gets your blood sugar up and keeps your salt replenished is a good bet for a mid-marathon snack. Avoid trail mix, because while peanuts are packed with protein, they’re also a choking hazard and trying to spoon it into your mouth can cost you precious minutes on your time.

The Power of Hydration

Perhaps even more important than what you eat while training for and running a marathon is what you drink: water is great, but it won’t replenish the salt your body loses from running such a long distance. Sugary sports drinks are an option, as they contain salt, but they might not be veggie-friendly depending on the dyes used – even then, they aren’t the most healthy or balanced option.
Mix your own electrolyte solution by mixing maple syrup and salt with your water. The individual ratios needed vary from person to person, so test any mixture you decide on while training and far in advance of your goal race. If you’re not staying hydrated and not getting the right sugar and salt mixture, you’ll feel fatigued and foggy-headed after a race.

Commercially available electrolyte tablets and gels to mix with water also exist, but not all of them are vegan. Check the ingredient list and ask the manufacturer about any questionable sources. Many veggie runners find these to be perfectly valid options, and they take the guesswork out of staying well-hydrated.

What Do Veggie Marathoners Eat?

Veggie marathoners eat what they need to fuel their bodies for a high-intensity, endurance activity. Plenty of carbohydrates at regular intervals mixed with vegetable-based proteins found in a nutritionally solid diet keep your body primed and ready to run. Staying hydrated is part of the health and nutrition of running. As always, speak to your doctor or nutritionist before altering your diet and embarking on a marathon training program; they can advise you of any requirements specific to your individual body and needs.

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#2 Old 01-25-2016, 09:06 AM
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What does it take to run 26.2 miles? A lot of training, fortitude and the right nutrition. Running gurus stress the importance of protein when training for a marathon, but often suggest animal-based sources as a means of getting it. Living vegetarian or vegan doesn’t mean you have to forsake your love of running: it just means you may have to get creative with your pre-run menus.

The Protein Problem - And Why It Isn’t

Your body needs protein to build muscle, which is crucial to having the stamina and strength necessary to run a marathon. If your body doesn’t get enough protein while engaging in high-energy activities like training for a marathon, it’ll pull protein from your muscles to burn as extra energy. If you’re eating a nutritionally solid diet, you probably get all the protein you need to maintain your body’s muscle mass with enough left to spare to build up some extra muscle.

Aside from maintaining and building muscle, the reason many fitness and running experts tout protein as the way to go when training for a marathon is because it’s one of the densest forms of caloric energy: a little bit of protein carries the same amount of potential energy as a larger amount of energy from carbohydrates. Simply put: you’d have to eat more pieces of toast to get the same amount of energy as a glob of peanut butter.

Potential energy from protein is also processed differently by the body than potential energy from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are easily broken down and consumed by the body, whereas protein is more of a long, slow burn. When you’re training for a marathon without using animal-based food sources, you need to eat more frequently to compensate for that lack of slow burning energy.

What to Eat Before Running

Vegan and vegetarian runners can listen to the running experts on this one: carbohydrates are where it’s at. Carb-loading, the process of eating extra carbohydrates before engaging in strenuous physical activity, is the best way for vegans and vegetarians to get the energy needed to run a marathon.

The type of carbohydrates you eat matter. Sugars from fruit provide a quick jolt of energy, while some runners find that the carbohydrates found in starchy grains like bread are too bulky on their stomach to allow them to run comfortably.

Many vegetarian and vegan runners, like Alina Zavatsky of Vegan Runner Eats, swear by dates as the perfect pre-marathon meal. A handful of dates provides all the energy you’ll need to run the first 5 to 10 miles. Supplement the dates with a little bit of protein and extra sugar from peanut butter (or eggs, if you’re a vegetarian and not a vegan).

What Vegans and Vegetarians Eat While Running

Most marathoners need to eat while running: it’s just a fact of life. But veggie marathoners really need to keep their energy up while in the middle of a marathon. Again, dates are recommended for their quick energy jolt: some veggie and vegan runners even make their own energy paste or “goo” by mixing a source of protein, carbohydrates, potassium and electrolytes – which is basically protein, sugar, potassium and salt. Peanut butter, date syrup, molasses and salt are good foundations of a squeezable goo you can grab and go on your marathon.

Other options for mid-marathon snacking include fruit leather and salted raisins. Anything that gets your blood sugar up and keeps your salt replenished is a good bet for a mid-marathon snack. Avoid trail mix, because while peanuts are packed with protein, they’re also a choking hazard and trying to spoon it into your mouth can cost you precious minutes on your time.

The Power of Hydration

Perhaps even more important than what you eat while training for and running a marathon is what you drink: water is great, but it won’t replenish the salt your body loses from running such a long distance. Sugary sports drinks are an option, as they contain salt, but they might not be veggie-friendly depending on the dyes used – even then, they aren’t the most healthy or balanced option.
Mix your own electrolyte solution by mixing maple syrup and salt with your water. The individual ratios needed vary from person to person, so test any mixture you decide on while training and far in advance of your goal race. If you’re not staying hydrated and not getting the right sugar and salt mixture, you’ll feel fatigued and foggy-headed after a race.

Commercially available electrolyte tablets and gels to mix with water also exist, but not all of them are vegan. Check the ingredient list and ask the manufacturer about any questionable sources. Many veggie runners find these to be perfectly valid options, and they take the guesswork out of staying well-hydrated.

What Do Veggie Marathoners Eat?

Veggie marathoners eat what they need to fuel their bodies for a high-intensity, endurance activity. Plenty of carbohydrates at regular intervals mixed with vegetable-based proteins found in a nutritionally solid diet keep your body primed and ready to run. Staying hydrated is part of the health and nutrition of running. As always, speak to your doctor or nutritionist before altering your diet and embarking on a marathon training program; they can advise you of any requirements specific to your individual body and needs.

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#3 Old 01-25-2016, 05:47 PM
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Most marathoners need to eat while running: it’s just a fact of life. But veggie marathoners really need to keep their energy up while in the middle of a marathon.
Why would a veggie marathoner need to keep their energy up any more than an omni runner? Heck, when I went vegan from omni, my stamina and strength improved dramatically. Vegan ultra runners like Scott Jurek, Ruth Heidrich, Fiona Oakes, and Rich Roll all noticed dramatic improvement in their physique and performance as vegans. I wouldn't say we have a disadvantage at all.
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#4 Old 09-22-2016, 01:20 AM
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I'd be interested to find out exactly which tablets are vegan friendly for adding elotrolytes to water. Or if anyone knows the correct/near correct ratios of how much maple syrup and salt to add to water that would be great.

I'm currently just at 5k running and my time is 32.25 minutes for that (on a treadmill) i'm no-where near close to marathon but i'd like to build up to that.

The food info is interesting even if the wording of the article isn't ideal.
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#5 Old 10-21-2016, 11:50 PM
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Originally Posted by VeggieBoards View Post

Aside from maintaining and building muscle, the reason many fitness and running experts tout protein as the way to go when training for a marathon is because it’s one of the densest forms of caloric energy: a little bit of protein carries the same amount of potential energy as a larger amount of energy from carbohydrates. Simply put: you’d have to eat more pieces of toast to get the same amount of energy as a glob of peanut butter.

Attachment 13257

Hello @VeggieBoards

Unfortunately, this article contains rather gross flaws.

A little bit of protein does NOT carry the same amount of potential energy as a larger amount of carbohydrates. Protein and carbohydrates contain the same amount of energy: 4 calories per gram. The most calorie-dense macronutrient is fat, not protein. Fat contains 9 calories per gram. https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/how-many-c...ate-or-protein

Yes, peanut butter contains more per energy per gram than toast. However, that's because peanut butter includes 72% of its calories as fat (https://www.google.com/#q=peanut+butter+macronutrients ), and fat contains 9 calories per gram.

The respectfully ask VerticalScope (the owners of VeggieBoards, and the authors of this article) to make corrections to this article.
.
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"Users tend to aggregate in communities of interest, which causes reinforcement and fosters confirmation bias, segregation, and polarization. This comes at the expense of the quality of the information and leads to proliferation of biased narratives fomented by unsubstantiated rumors, mistrust, and paranoia."

- "The Spreading of Misinformation Online", from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, December 2015

Last edited by David3; 10-22-2016 at 08:24 AM.
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#6 Old 10-22-2016, 12:13 AM
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Potential energy from protein is also processed differently by the body than potential energy from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are easily broken down and consumed by the body, whereas protein is more of a long, slow burn. When you’re training for a marathon without using animal-based food sources, you need to eat more frequently to compensate for that lack of slow burning energy.

Attachment 13257

Hello @VeggieBoards

The non-profit American Council on Exercise states that carbohydrates are the best fuel for your muscles and brain: https://www.acefitness.org/blog/4948...re-your-friend

(More information about the American Council on Exercise: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Council_on_Exercise )


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the world's largest association of Registered Dietitians) makes these statements regarding endurance sports, carbohydrates, and protein:

"Carbohydrates are a primary fuel for exercise and sports, especially those of moderate to high intensities. Adequate carbohydrates spares protein use as a fuel source during exercise."

"Protein also is used as a minor fuel for endurance exercise and sport."

Link: http://www.eatright.org/resource/fit...-for-endurance


I respectfully advise VerticalScope (the owners of VeggieBoards, and the authors of this article) to make corrections to its article.

_________
"Users tend to aggregate in communities of interest, which causes reinforcement and fosters confirmation bias, segregation, and polarization. This comes at the expense of the quality of the information and leads to proliferation of biased narratives fomented by unsubstantiated rumors, mistrust, and paranoia."

- "The Spreading of Misinformation Online", from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, December 2015

Last edited by David3; 10-22-2016 at 08:24 AM.
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#7 Old 10-22-2016, 12:29 AM
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Why would a veggie marathoner need to keep their energy up any more than an omni runner? Heck, when I went vegan from omni, my stamina and strength improved dramatically. Vegan ultra runners like Scott Jurek, Ruth Heidrich, Fiona Oakes, and Rich Roll all noticed dramatic improvement in their physique and performance as vegans. I wouldn't say we have a disadvantage at all.


I'm with Naturebound, I'd even take it one step further and suggest that there is an advantage.
Weather it's for ethical reasons or health/fitness, choosing a veg*n diet usually drives an increase in knowledge of foods and therefore energy delivery to the body.

I've done marathons, ultra-marathons and Ironman and never been at a disadvantage for an energy balance.

Only once when I (stupidly) followed a weight loss kick start week with my wife at the start of the P90x program she wanted to do, did I really struggle, it was a low fat week and as you may guess, the balance was so far off for me that I lost power and actually felt ill.

The protein/carb/fat BALANCE is what's critical for performance weather your goal is 5K or ultra endurance.


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#8 Old 10-22-2016, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Geminatronix View Post
I'd be interested to find out exactly which tablets are vegan friendly for adding elotrolytes to water. Or if anyone knows the correct/near correct ratios of how much maple syrup and salt to add to water that would be great.

I'm currently just at 5k running and my time is 32.25 minutes for that (on a treadmill) i'm no-where near close to marathon but i'd like to build up to that.

The food info is interesting even if the wording of the article isn't ideal.


I use Nuun electrolyte tablets for years, found the lemon/lime Ones very easy on the GI system.
Understand electrolytes and use if you are loosing significant fluid during your training sessions, but just as important is to enjoy your balanced diet and top up your body with post work out recovery food.



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#9 Old 03-05-2017, 12:44 PM
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I've built up to running half marathons over the last four years, after going vegan (whole food plant based) following a heart attack. I find it easy to get sufficient nutrition on a vegan diet. Because I expend more energy running a long distance than I would at rest, I eat a larger quantity of food. Eating a larger quantity of whole plant foods means getting a larger quantity of nutrients such as protein, in proportion with this. And it means getting a larger quantity of carbohydrates as well, to fuel the energy needs of distance running. So the "problem" of vegan nutrition for running essentially takes care of itself. "Keep it carbed, baby!" ^_^
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#10 Old 03-05-2017, 01:23 PM
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Training for Ironman it felt like I never stopped eating! I plateaued at a weight level and then in the last 12 week training block I lost weight again, I was worried this was my diet choice but the (omni) guys I was training with had similar experiences.


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