are puffed corn and puffed rice healthy? - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
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#1 Old 11-23-2006, 11:51 PM
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does any one eat these , they are puffed wholegrains?
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#2 Old 11-24-2006, 02:46 AM
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I suppose you'd have to say what you mean by "healthy" They're surely better than a lot of cereals..no sugar, preservatives, etc. Puffed wheat is actually my favorite.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#3 Old 11-24-2006, 05:20 AM
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No, they are not healthy. You are much better off with a hot cereal like oatmeal or grits. As far as cold cereals, Familia is ideal. It is basically oats, nuts, dried apples and raisins. I can get the facts about why puffed foods are not healthy, just let me know if you want them.
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#4 Old 11-24-2006, 10:30 AM
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taliaj, could you please post them? I never buy puffed foods because they seem to lack fiber, but I'm curious about what information you have.
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#5 Old 11-24-2006, 10:37 AM
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I'd love those facts, too. I can't imagine what happens to them to make them not healthy. Or did you mean that they're neutral? Nothing specifically healthy, but not bad for you? How would you compare them to brown rice, or potato chips?
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#6 Old 11-24-2006, 06:00 PM
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Ok, take a look at this webpage: http://drbenkim.com/articles/acrylamide-food.htm. It pretty much explains it. BTW, Dr. Ben Kim is a fabulous nutritionist and has plenty of other great articles on his website.
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#7 Old 11-24-2006, 06:08 PM
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No, they aren't healthy. I read of some studies quoted in one of Harvey Diamond's book that showed them to be pretty unhealthy. I know we don't believe in animal studies, but mice fed puffed grains died in two weeks, which was faster than those fed a diet of sugar. You would think puffed grains would be better than sugar, but apparently not. I don't remember all the details of the study.
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#8 Old 11-24-2006, 06:31 PM
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can i have those facts
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#9 Old 11-24-2006, 06:33 PM
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so is popped corn better?
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#10 Old 11-24-2006, 10:29 PM
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they aren't UNhealthy but they certainly have no nutrition. opt for whole grains in the most unprocessed form possible ('puffed' = VERY processed). eat whole grains.
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#11 Old 11-25-2006, 01:15 AM
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This is just plain depressing...

Everybody is a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing that it is stupid...~Albert Einstein~
"Nothing tastes as good as kindness feels" - ~ElaineV~
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#12 Old 11-25-2006, 05:58 AM
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Looking at that link, I'm not sure what he means by soft bread. And I'm assuming he means pizza dough? I wonder if home made is the same as storebought.



I can't find anything about puffed foods on that page, though. I did a Find on this page search for puffed, and nothing. Popcorn is there, and a lot of common foods that I also eat.
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#13 Old 11-25-2006, 06:04 AM
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Elena, there are puffed cereals on that list. From that article you should have gotten that puffed foods contain acrylamides, which are cancer causing.



Sorry about the bad news
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#14 Old 11-25-2006, 06:15 AM
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Ehh, I'm not ready to jump on the paranoia wagon yet. What is considered a large dose? I need numbers, at least a range, not a table with numbers that mean nothing beside them. How much do you have to eat, how often? And considering how common these foods are, why don't we all have neurological disorders and/or cancer? And what kind of cancer did the animals get?



Plus, this guy is trying to sell stuff. He has an agenda. I'm not discrediting him completely based on that, but it makes him suspicious.



I'd also trust it more if this was posted in a medical journal. It's not a good idea to just believe things that you read on the internet, you know?
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#15 Old 11-25-2006, 06:20 AM
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What is considered large doses? That's like asking what large doses of red meat is. Just try to avoid those foods as much as possible. You don't have to eat any of those foods, they have been correlated with cancer after all.



Elena, we have a cancer epidemic never before seen in our country and neurological disorders are really on the rise. More children have ADHD now than ever before. Same goes for depression and anxiety disorders. This cannot be contributed solely to these foods, however, but you cannot say that neurological disorders and cancer are not prevailant in our society.



I have also read medical journals on the internet that prove the same thing this guy is saying. I will get them if you'd like.
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#16 Old 11-25-2006, 06:31 AM
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Agreed with those saying that these are not the most healthful choice..you could get more fiber, etc. by choosing a different cereal.



The verdict on acrylamides is far from set though. Remember the big brouhaha after the "potato chip" study a couple of years ago?

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#17 Old 11-25-2006, 06:36 AM
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I'd still like to see numbers, if they're available. It's hard to read that table properly when you don't know if 100 means really bad, or average, or what, and how much people with neurological disorders caused by these foods had.



By the way, I live in Canada, not the US. I actually haven't heard of half of the cereals on that list. We have different standards (note: not necessarily better, just different), for example there's a lot less high-fructose corn syrup going around. We do still have that awful Count Chocula and Trix, though, which I agree should not be a regular part of anyone's diet. I noticed that Rice Krispies wasn't there, and that's puffed rice. That's the only cereal I eat regularly.



Sure, if you can find the articles in medical journals online, I'd like to see them. I mostly wanted to know if this particular doctor has this article in a medical journal.
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#18 Old 11-25-2006, 06:44 AM
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Dr. Ben Kim is located in Canada as well. And that list is not perfect and will not have all cereals on it. I will look at the numbers to see what you are talking about. I will also post the studies later today when I can find them.
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#19 Old 11-25-2006, 06:55 AM
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Alrighty.



To clarify, I'll explain again; beside each product, there is a number. It could be 32, 104, 523, 209, etc. He explains that it's parts per billion, but not the significance. I'm assuming that each one is for one serving, but he doesn't say when it becomes dangerous. For example, if you have 1 serving a day of something that is a 200, is that dangerous? Or if you have 3 servings a day of something that is 50, is that dangerous? The numbers just don't mean much to me, especially when most of them seem to be under 200, then there are a few that are in the 400s/500s. If the answer is to use moderation, how do we know what a good level of moderation is? Should we just not eat the ones that are above 300?
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#20 Old 11-25-2006, 07:15 AM
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Dr. Kim is a chiropractor, not a nutritionist. Just a FYI.
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#21 Old 11-25-2006, 07:16 AM
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I already know this Jenna. I think he would have more credibility as a true doctor, but I still believe he knows what he is talking about. Have you ever looked at any of his articles?
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#22 Old 11-25-2006, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jenna View Post

Dr. Kim is a chiropractor, not a nutritionist. Just a FYI.



Thanks, Jenna.
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#23 Old 11-25-2006, 08:10 AM
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Dr. Kim also has an article on his site about how unhealthy the vegan diet is.
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#24 Old 11-25-2006, 08:16 AM
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Hey, you guys asked for other people's points of view and I gave it to you...Not saying he's right on all subjects, but he does make some good points.
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#25 Old 11-25-2006, 03:09 PM
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Bottom line - They contain powerful cancer causing acrylamides. The more you eat the higher your risk of cancer.
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#26 Old 11-25-2006, 05:23 PM
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Not bottom line...about a gazillion food items contain some sort of potential cancer causing agent.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#27 Old 11-25-2006, 05:29 PM
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Especially this "soft bread". Though now I get why he's able to lump bread all into one thing; what apparently causes this issue is baking at a really high temperature.
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#28 Old 11-27-2006, 03:19 PM
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I guess you couldn't find any articles in the medical journals by him?



It's okay.
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#29 Old 11-12-2007, 09:30 PM
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Well, I came across this article and I'm confused. I eat puffed corn quite often. I buy it at my local health food store. It's just corn pressurized with steam then quickly the pressure is released, puffing the endosperm many times larger. Are these puffed whole grains dangerous??
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