Making your own QUORN !! - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
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#1 Old 08-25-2006, 05:15 AM
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We're thinking about making are own Quorn , do you guys reckon is feasible. We're thinking about just on a small scale to help feed us . Looks simple enough. Has anyone here ever thought about amking there own quorn , if so how have you gone about it ?


    • continually oxygenated water in large sterile fermentation tanks (don't need to be large etc.)
    • Fusarium venenatum is the fungus (mould used to make micoprotein for quorn)
  • During the growth phase glucose is added as a food for the fungus,
  • as are various vitamins and minerals (to improve the food value of the resulting product).
  • The resulting mycoprotein is then extracted and heat-treated to remove excess levels of RNA.

NOTE:Previous attempts at producing such fermented protein foodstuffs were thwarted by excessive levels of DNA or RNA; without the heat treatment, purine, found in nucleic acids, is metabolised producing uric acid, which can lead to gout.[8]
  • The product is then dried and mixed with chicken egg albumen, (which acts as a binder. It is then textured, giving it some of the grained character of meat, and pressed either into a mince (resembling ground beef) or into chunks (resembling diced chicken breast). In this form Quorn has a light )brown





Fermentation Techniques



From http://www.mycoproteineducation.com/...rmentation.php



Fermentation in the food industry can either take place :

1. when microbes are suspended in a liquid medium into which oxygen (air) is pumped. To ensure that all the cells have sufficient food and oxygen the mixture in the fermenter must be constantly mixed. These conditions are provided by two different types of fermenter :



a) Mechanical stirring using a paddle in the fermenter vessel shown below. This method is often used in smaller laboratory fermenters.



Fermentation also either takes place in what are known as a 'batch ' or 'continuous ' processes.

Batch fermentation involves filling the fermenter with medium (nutrients) and a starting culture. It is operated in conditions suitable for growth and then emptied so that the product can be harvested. Finally the fermenter is cleaned ready for the process to be repeated. With this method the product is produced in batches.



Continuous fermentation involves setting up a fermenter in the same way as for the batch method. With this method there is continuous removal of product and waste from the system while fresh nutrients continuously enter the fermenter. Continuous fermentation has mostly replaced the batch fermenter system in some industries as it is provides the best yields and longest periods between clean-downs.



With both methods the product has to be recovered from a mixture containing by-products. This is usually done using a filtration system to separate the waste and product. In cheese production the waste is whey which is used as animal feed. In beer making it is the dead yeast cells which are disposed of and in mycoprotein production it is the liquid in which the mycoprotein is grown.



The fermenter used to grow mycoprotein is a pressure cycle fermenter, which relies on air pumped through the system to circulate the broth and the continuous method of fermentation is used.



2. When solid materials are inoculated with a particular organism, its subsequent growth may introduce new flavours and/or textures, or preserves the system by producing acids. Blue cheeses and tempeh are perhaps the most common products of this type in the developed world, but as shown above, there are many others.
LL
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#2 Old 08-25-2006, 05:27 AM
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I failed math 3 times......
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#3 Old 08-25-2006, 05:38 AM
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well i don't think it is too much harder than people making there own cider etc. Though im still trying to find a place to get Fusarium venenatum from :P
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#4 Old 08-25-2006, 01:39 PM
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What the HECK? I fail at making playdough.



Please tell me you're not serious.



If you are? Could you come look at the ice machine on my fridge and tell me why it won't work?
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#5 Old 08-25-2006, 02:06 PM
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I can't even make a SANDWICH without screwing it up....
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#6 Old 08-25-2006, 07:39 PM
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>> * The resulting mycoprotein is then extracted and heat-treated to remove excess levels of RNA.



NOTE:Previous attempts at producing such fermented protein foodstuffs were thwarted by excessive levels of DNA or RNA; without the heat treatment, purine, found in nucleic acids, is metabolised producing uric acid, which can lead to gout.[8]>>



This step, which apparently leads to dangerous product if you **** it up, sounds more complicated than your average household chemistry.



ebola
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#7 Old 08-26-2006, 03:41 AM
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well heat treatment I guess it just heating it up ( i might talk to some biology teachers to get the right tempreature) . The rest if kept on a small scale doesn't seem that hard (defenetly worth the effort for free home made quorn !!) . We do need to find where we can buy that mould though.
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#8 Old 08-26-2006, 07:26 AM
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I think I would recommend against this. 1st rule in my lab is not to eat anything in there, let alone, eat something I MAKE in there.



Freeze your tofu. Its easier. ;-)
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#9 Old 08-28-2006, 12:29 AM
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>>well heat treatment I guess it just heating it up ( i might talk to some biology teachers to get the right tempreature) . The rest if kept on a small scale doesn't seem that hard (defenetly worth the effort for free home made quorn !!) . We do need to find where we can buy that mould though.>>



Well, I, for one, don't know how I'd go about extracting mycoprotein from the rest of the fungal mass. Do you?



ebola
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#10 Old 08-28-2006, 12:15 PM
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Huh? sounds like too much work but if it works for you thats cool. Hope it works out for ya
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#11 Old 08-28-2006, 03:34 PM
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I think the danger of producing toxins might outweigh any benefit of making it yourself. Do you have the facilities to test for toxins such as the wrong strain of mold growing in the product? Many molds/fungi are very toxic, and may leave toxins behind even if they are killed by heat.



I'd start out trying to make your own tempeh if you just have to play with mold!
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#12 Old 08-28-2006, 05:26 PM
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Tempeh or natto.
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#13 Old 08-28-2006, 11:40 PM
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The fact that you ferment something and if you do it wrong, it becomes something dangerous to eat, is enough to make me want to steer clear of the process. Otherwise, it sounds neat. A much easier thing to do would be to experiment with growing yeast on a bed of molasses and use it in homeade Nature's (TM) burgers. You still have the possibility of growing the wrong fungus (or small amounts of the wrong fungus being present) if you do this.
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#14 Old 08-28-2006, 11:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnome Chomsky View Post

>>well heat treatment I guess it just heating it up ( i might talk to some biology teachers to get the right tempreature) . The rest if kept on a small scale doesn't seem that hard (defenetly worth the effort for free home made quorn !!) . We do need to find where we can buy that mould though.>>



Well, I, for one, don't know how I'd go about extracting mycoprotein from the rest of the fungal mass. Do you?



ebola



I understand hexane is used to extract a lot of nutrients -- protein, beta carotene, etc. and though toxic, can easily be evaporated off.



Big Disclaimer: These are not recommendations and I would not do them myself!
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#15 Old 08-29-2006, 12:51 AM
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>>Tempeh or natto.>>



Natto is indicative of the wrong fungus in and of itself.
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#16 Old 08-29-2006, 04:14 PM
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This sounds like a cool idea, let us know if it works. I made my own orange juice beer with no directions while in University and I didn't go blind or die.......so I reckon you can do this!
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#17 Old 09-16-2006, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1988 View Post

well heat treatment I guess it just heating it up ( i might talk to some biology teachers to get the right tempreature) . The rest if kept on a small scale doesn't seem that hard (defenetly worth the effort for free home made quorn !!) . We do need to find where we can buy that mould though.



RNA is pretty fussy and breaks down relatively easily in the presence of RNases, which are everywhere. I suppose you could look up a few companies that sell ribonucleases and look for optimum temperature and pH/which conditions will "kill" the enzyme, and you'd probably have to lyse the cells first.



You'd still have to remove the nucleotides from your "mixture" though. The purines themselves will still be in working order after being at over 94°C for quite a bit, or else polymerase chain reactions wouldn't work. If you were to deproteinize a cell extract in the lab, you'd centrifuge the proteins into a pellet and use an organic solvent to get whatever's left out of solution. I somehow doubt that's feasible...



That said, fungi aren't that fussy (on top of being ubiquitous), so it's very easy to get contamination with species you wouldn't want in your food unless you have the means to keep your batch sterile. And quite frankly, I'm not sure how you'd be able to do that at home. Your garden variety fish tank aerating gadget would probably introduce spores. Not that I find Quorn appealing anyway
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