Rice Milk Yogurt? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 06-27-2006, 08:46 PM
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Does anyone know if you can turn rice milk into rice yogurt? I prefer rice milk to soy milk and always have some left over that I'd like to turn into yogurt. I know you can do it with soy milk but I can't seem to find anything online about whether it will work with rice milk. I might just have to give it a try.

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#2 Old 06-28-2006, 09:43 AM
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They make tons of items w/ rice instead of soy but haven't come acrosse rice yogurt. Contact some of the companies & ask them.
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#3 Old 06-28-2006, 01:35 PM
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I would imagine that rice milk would have insufficient protein.



ebola
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#4 Old 06-29-2006, 06:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Wonder View Post

Does anyone know if you can turn rice milk into rice yogurt? ~Wonder



I tried this once and it smelled sort of like a yogurt but was still liquid and never thickened. I may have done something wrong, but after I noticed that I'd never seen rice yogurt for sale either, I just figured it wasn't suitable for making yogurt. If you try it and have success, I'd love to hear how you do it!
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#5 Old 06-29-2006, 09:22 AM
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I did an experiment making rice yogurt and soy yogurt. Neither of them got very thick because the store-bought yogurts usually have some sort of thickener added to them. It did get "yogurty" though. So if you wanted to make your own it will work, but I'd thicken it with something like pectin.
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#6 Old 09-04-2006, 07:04 AM
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Like all the others, I tried to make yogurt out of thick home made rice milk, and it turns out as liquid as before, with a yogurt-like taste (sour, mostly).

Instead, I make excellent soy yougurt from good quality soy milk bought at local organic food store, that actually turns out liquid only when I add sugar or jam before the fermentation process.

I will try not adding sugar nor salt to the rice milk, and let you know.
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#7 Old 09-05-2006, 03:21 PM
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You could always add a thickener (cornstarch?) and see if that helps
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#8 Old 12-05-2006, 02:50 AM
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I've found this thread while doing Google Search on Rice Yoghourt.



I first of all would like to learn to do Rice Milk. CAn somebody help me? And later, rice yoghourt too, even if it gets too thin. I am milk and soy intolerant and need the bacteria for my sick stomach, so I woudn't mind if the rice milk is too thin as long as it has the bacteria inside.



Thanks in advance.
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#9 Old 12-05-2006, 03:47 AM
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You can find Rick Milk at almost any major grocery store chain. If they don't have it in the refrigerated section, then check for shelf stable packages in the health food section. There are recipes online for making your own rice milk, but I've never had any success with them. If you want to try to make rice yogurt, you need to get yourself some bacteria either in the form of a starter kit or borrow a spoonful of soy or other yogurt. But since you're intolerant to soy and milk, you might have a hard time finding a starter. This one appears to be soy and dairy free:

http://www.celticseasalt.com/KEFIR_S...E_P221C223.cfm



Once you get the starter, you can experiment with the rice yogurt. Just add the starter to some rice milk in a covered container and keep over a heating pad on low. 8-12 hours later you should have the closest thing to rice yogurt you're probably going to get. I've never actually tried to make rice yogurt so I have no idea what you're going to get. Chances are you'll have separation, kinda like curds and whey. But if you add the curds and some of the whey to a blender and blend for awhile, you should get a smooth product. But like I said before, I have no idea what you'll actually get. If it works for you, save a tablespoon or 2 of the yogurt so you can use it as a starter for the next batch.



If rice milk doesn't work well, you can always try some other nut milk, such as almond. It might work better.

HTH,

~Wondre
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#10 Old 01-28-2007, 05:41 PM
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I am currently in the same boat you were in when your thoughts were posted. Should I be looking around for you, or have you gained rice milk yogurt enlightenment. I impatiently await your reply, thanks.
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#11 Old 01-28-2007, 08:03 PM
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You know, I never got around to doing it. I've just gone without yogurt. Rice milk is almost always twice as expensive as soymilk is around here so I've switched over to soy. I should do a test, but I don't think it would work out all that well. Sorry.

~Wondre
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#12 Old 01-28-2007, 08:21 PM
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Yogurt is gross anyway.
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#13 Old 01-29-2007, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielB View Post

I first of all would like to learn to do Rice Milk. CAn somebody help me?



I posted a rice milk recipe a while back in ou recipe section. Here's the link:



http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...ad.php?t=56444



We use this rice milk for everything... from cereal for my son and hubby... to drinking, smoothies... to recipes... I even make a rice milk based vegan "mayo" from it that could easily sub as a yogurt (sans the bacteria... unless you want to add it, not sure how that would work b/c I haven't tried it but... who knows). In fact, I'm making a curried quinoa recipe today that calls for yogurt and will sub my "rice mayo" instead b/c of the tang. It should work out great for it.



HTH!
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#14 Old 01-31-2007, 11:53 PM
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You can also make yoghurt from coconut milk. I'm planning on trying this one soon and I've also got a recipe or 2 of almond nut yoghurt. I tried one but I didn't leave it long enough and it was kinda icky. I've heard good things about the coconut yoghurt though. I too am soy intolerant but am planning on using a soy yoghurt as a starter cause there won't be much soy in it.
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#15 Old 02-01-2007, 12:16 AM
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Oooh, I might just try that coconut milk yogurt. Do you have a recipe? If only I could get some soy yogurt around here as a starter.

~Wondre
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#16 Old 02-01-2007, 04:23 AM
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I can't remember where I pilfered this from so I hope it's okay to post:



Here's how you can turn your favorite nuts, seeds, and Coconuts into beneficial yogurt:



Blend one cup of your favorite raw nuts or raw seeds (soaked in pure water for 24 hours and drained) with one cup of pure water. Add 1/2 teaspoon of probiotic powder (I recommend Probiotic blend powder from Natural Choice Products, 1-800-626-5143). Blend the mixture until smooth. Pour mixture into a sealable container and allow to stand covered with a paper towel for three hours. This process allows the mixture to culture.



Coconut yogurt



Blend 1 cup of coconut meat (from a young coconut, found in Asian Markets) with one cup of the young coconut water. Add 1/2 teaspoon of probiotic powder. Blend the mixture until smooth. Pour into a sealable container and allow mixture to stand covered with a paper towel for three hours. This process allows the mixture to culture.



Young Coconuts contain high amounts of electrolytes and Nature's purest water, while the meat contains essential fatty acids that fight candida and enhance our overall health.



You can use these cultured yogurts as a base for your favorite salad dressings, dips and smoothies, or just eat the yogurt plain.



Now you can see how easy it is to include cultured foods into your daily regime and start reaping the amazing health benefits.



Here's the steps one takes for making anything into "yogurt".



1) Kill the bad bacteria in your starting medium (milk, coconut milk, whatever). For non-milk products you can usually just boil it.



2) Add gelatin or pectin if you want it to get a yogurt like consistency, otherwise, if it isn't milk, it'll have more of a kefir like consistency. A thick liquid.



3) Add your bacteria food (something with sugars in it, like 1Tbl honey, pureed pineaple or banana). Mix well.



4) Cool to 90-100 degrees.



5) Add culture and incubate for 4-24 hours.



6) Pour into a clean container and refrigerate until it sets up.

================================================



Ok, specific to Coconut Milk yogurt:



I use 2 cans of coconut milk. Make sure you get some without perservative. I get mine at Trader Joe's. It is a "light" brand. I haven't tried it yet with a full fat brand. I want to try it though.



I use 1 or slightly less than 1 packet of gelatin. It gets a bit too jello-like with a full packet, so maybe 3/4 or 3/5 of a packet is better.



You can just leave out the gelatin and it is like kefir and makes a mean smoothie with a little lemon juice and sweetner!



What's it taste like? Well, less sour than milk yogurt. I think it tastes a little like coconut still, but it has a great tang to it. I recommend going a full 24 hours because it doesn't get that terribly tangy and you'll get more of the beneficial bacteria per serving.



I got the idea for this from a web site (I don't have the URL) where the woman described making yogurt from cashews and water. So you can see, that you can "yogurtize" almost anything given the right temperatures, bacteria and give them something to eat so they can reproduce.



I think I have another I'll just check....



This is a nut one from Elaine who wrote the specific carbohydrate diet:



ALMOND, FILBERT OR MACADAMIA YOGURT

NUT YOGHURT RECIPE

1 1/3 cup whole, RAW blanched almonds or RAW blanched hazelnuts (filberts) or RAW macadamias

2 TBL clear honey

Water

Yoghurt starter (ProGurt by GI ProHealth)



Step-by-step instructions for making nut yoghurt:



Put all things you need on a tea towel on the kitchen table:

blender, a fine sieve, some tea towels, the nuts, honey, two tablespoons, whisk, water, yoghurt maker + yoghurt container. Get the probiotics out of the freezer only when you need them.



Put nuts into blender



Add enough cold water to get a total of 4 to 5 cups / =1 litre



Add 2 tablespoons of honey



Blend for 10 minutes (use a stopwatch)



Pour about 1 cup of the nut milk through the fine sieve

(You can squeeze out more liquid if you use a teacloth and twist it firmly.)



NOW take your probiotics out of the freezer





Add 1/8 tsp of ProGurt yoghurt starter to the milk, per 1 quart of yogurt.



Stir well with whisk, add the rest of the milk, with back of spoon press out all liquids



Stir well and place container in yoghurt maker



Ferment for 8 hours.



Place in the fridge overnight or at least for 5 hours (overnight is better)



Get a bowl, put the sieve on the bowl, put a cheesecloth in the sieve



Pour the yoghurt in the cheesecloth so that it can drip



Drip for about an hour, or longer if you'd like the yoghurt thicker



By pressing the dripped yoghurt further, you can make something that resembles cheese



The fermentation process takes place at about 105 Fahrenheit.



As you see, I do NOT cook or heat the milk. After blending, the milk should be lukewarm, not warmer than 105F. If you heat more, the milk will separate and the fermentation will not take place.



Try to find RAW nuts that have been through minimal processing. Deep frying them may be very tasty, but it will negatively affect the outcome and it is also a bit unhealthy.



The sieve is such, that if you pour orange juice through it, there's no pulp in your glass.



This nut yoghurt is a nice and safe alternative when you cannot tolerate goat's or cow's yoghurt (yet). Go for it!



Sounds like a lot of bother though...



Oh and here's some other destructions on seed and nut yoghurt using kefir or some other thing you create with millet but I haven't tried these yet either http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/vegmilk.html



Promise me you'll let me know how you go!!!???!! I have 3 kids so it might be a while before I get a chance to make these, although I'm going to attempt the coconut milk one tomorrow (I'm sure I had an easier one but I can't find it anywhere!!! GRRR)
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#17 Old 08-14-2007, 09:22 PM
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I just found a product called Ricera Yogurt at Whole Foods. We really like it. It is kind of expensive. But we can't have soy or dairy, so I am very thankful!

I have never made my own, but now I am wondering if I could just use it some of it to start my own culture by adding it to rice milk??? hhmm. Maybe I'll try someday.
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#18 Old 01-07-2008, 11:52 AM
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The lactobacilli 'eat' the sugars in lactose to grow/live and, in the process increase their numbers, thus making yogurt. One microbiologist's opinion, posted at http://www.fatfree.com/archive/1997/jun/msg00331.html, says that since she doesn't believe rice milk contains lactose, lactobacilli won't grow and thrive, hence no yogurt. She was also worried about what might grow instead.



Hope that helps. Keep trying to find an answer that works for you.
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#19 Old 01-07-2008, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chills1953 View Post

The lactobacilli 'eat' the sugars in lactose to grow/live and, in the process increase their numbers, thus making yogurt. One microbiologist's opinion, posted at http://www.fatfree.com/archive/1997/jun/msg00331.html, says that since she doesn't believe rice milk contains lactose, lactobacilli won't grow and thrive, hence no yogurt. She was also worried about what might grow instead.



Hope that helps. Keep trying to find an answer that works for you.

From Wikipedia:
Quote:
Lactobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacteria. They are a major part of the lactic acid bacteria group, named as such because most of its members convert lactose and other sugars to lactic acid.

Lactobacillus is used to make tons of non-dairy products like sauerkraut, pickles, beer, wine, cider, kimchi and other fermented foods. They also are the primary bacteria that causes dental cavities. They don't need lactose to reproduce. The only problem with rice milk yogurt would be whether or not the proteins in the rice milk would coagulate in an acidic environment.
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#20 Old 06-22-2008, 06:43 AM
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Ricera makes rice yogurt. The only problem is that you may have to buy a case of it (12 yogurts) bc not many natural/organic/co-ops have it. I tried ordering it in Ocean City, MD, but apparently the order was wrong (they sent chocolate cow instead). I have to find it bc my 2 year old is allergic to dairy, soy, wheat, nuts, and more, so rice milk has been a savior.

Good luck!





Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Wonder View Post

Does anyone know if you can turn rice milk into rice yogurt? I prefer rice milk to soy milk and always have some left over that I'd like to turn into yogurt. I know you can do it with soy milk but I can't seem to find anything online about whether it will work with rice milk. I might just have to give it a try.

~Wonder

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#21 Old 09-30-2009, 11:59 AM
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I've tried to make puddings with rice milk and have searched all day for a recipe for rice milk yogurt. My nephew is very sick and can't have dairy, soy, protein, wheat, gluten or egg. Mostly nothing and baking is really horrible. That said I thought I'd share what I found today. For the Starter for yogurt using rice milk instead.

# Most alternative milks require 1 to 2 tablespoons of honey per quart of milk to the mixture. This gives the starter cultures an environment to reproduce.

# NEVER stir or shake the milk/yogurt once it has been set in the yogurt maker to ferment.

# Dont ferment longer then the recommended times. This will usually burn off some of the active cultures. Ferment 24 hours for cow and goat milk and 8 to 12 hours for alternative milks.

# Never add any flavoring, fruits and nuts etc. Until the yogurt has cooled in the refrigerator.

# NEVER heat up yogurt once it has been cooled. Heating yogurt will kill the active cultures.

#

When using alternative milks such as Almond, coconut and other nut milks the recommended amount is 1/8 teaspoon per 2 quarts of milk. Some milks rice/hemp can use more then the 1/8 teaspoon. With a little experimenting you can fine tune amount of starter needed.





Please let me know how it goes for you guys. I'll be trying it later this week.
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#22 Old 02-09-2011, 07:27 AM
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Have you tried making the rice milk yogurt yet? How did it go? What was your exact recipe/method?

What type of yogurt maker did u use?

How long did u ferment it?

I LOBE Ricera's yogurt (it tastes like pudding and is even more delish with rice protein powder and Puffins Honey Ric cereal mixed in!), but the sugar content is SO high... hence the reason I want to make my own.

Has anyone tried to make yogurt with almond milk?

Thanks!!!
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#23 Old 02-09-2011, 09:20 AM
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I made yogurt with a mixture of almond and coconut milk - it turned out great. I think you could use just almond milk, but I would use homemade - I would doubt the store-bought variety has enough protein to thicken at all, but if you added agar, cornstarch, or another thickener, or if you just wanted to culture it for the flavor, it might work.

I've never tried rice milk yogurt. I would be concerned about Bacillus cereus growth in rice milk - Bacillus cereus can form an endospore which is highly resistant to heat, so even cooking the rice milk beforehand might not be enough.
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