Can I freeze tofu???? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 12-06-2005, 07:23 PM
 
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I just used half cake and I don't want to eat it the rest until next week.



Can I freeze it and use it in a couple of weeks????



Thanks



Carla
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#2 Old 12-06-2005, 07:24 PM
 
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I just used half cake and I don't want to eat it the rest until next week.



Can I freeze it and use it in a couple of weeks????



Thanks



Carla
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#3 Old 12-06-2005, 07:26 PM
 
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Yes.



But be aware that freezing will change the texture. This is not a bad thing-- many people intentionally freeze their tofu for the purpose of changing the texture. It becomes more chewy, and many people consider it "meatier." It also becomes more porous and soaks up marinades beautifully.
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#4 Old 12-06-2005, 07:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlaVeg View Post

I just used half cake and I don't want to eat it the rest until next week.



Can I freeze it and use it in a couple of weeks????



Thanks



Carla

Yes. But expect the texture to change. It will become more firm once it's thawed.
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#5 Old 12-06-2005, 07:37 PM
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...Interesting.



It will keep in the fridge for a week as long as you keep it submerged in water. ...It will keep even longer if you change the water with some frequency.
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#6 Old 12-06-2005, 07:39 PM
 
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A lot of people (myself included) like the change in texture. I say experiment with it and see what you think.
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#7 Old 12-06-2005, 07:59 PM
 
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i eat a 90% of my tofu after i freeze it. it's less like eating hot jello then (as a friend noted). you could also bake it, i hear it will stay in the fridge a bit that way too.
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#8 Old 12-06-2005, 08:57 PM
 
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GREAT. I'm going to freeze it right now...

but I don't have to freeze it with water right??? I just going to put the rest in a sanwdich bag. I hope that works.

Thank you all for your quick responses... you are THE BESTEST!!!!
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#9 Old 12-06-2005, 09:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlaVeg View Post

GREAT. I'm going to freeze it right now...

but I don't have to freeze it with water right??? I just going to put the rest in a sanwdich bag. I hope that works.

Thank you all for your quick responses... you are THE BESTEST!!!!



I find its best frozen if you drain and press it prior to freezing it... then press it again after it thaws. If you freeze it in water it takes like, 6 yrs to thaw.

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#10 Old 12-06-2005, 10:18 PM
 
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the frozen tofu is somewat like ... bread, lotsa wholes, ya know
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#11 Old 12-06-2005, 11:42 PM
 
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Tofu tip:



I thought it would be a great idea to cube the drained and pressed tofu before freezing. It didn't work out that well, because the tofu exudes more water as it freezes (leaving all those sponge-like holes behind), and it wound up frozen into a large icy mass which was a royal pain to thaw and chip apart. Just freeze the block, then thaw, then cube!
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#12 Old 12-06-2005, 11:50 PM
 
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There is a way to cube then freeze tofu. Press it, cut it into cubes, then put some wax paper on a baking sheet (with a lip) or in a baking pan. Arrange the tofu cubes so they don't touch each other, then put the pan in the freezer. Once the cubes are rock-hard, they won't stick to each other anymore and you can move them to a zip-top bag. I do this with the tofu I add to tomato sauce and it works wonderfully.
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#13 Old 12-07-2005, 10:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morna View Post

There is a way to cube then freeze tofu. Press it, cut it into cubes, then put some wax paper on a baking sheet (with a lip) or in a baking pan. Arrange the tofu cubes so they don't touch each other, then put the pan in the freezer. Once the cubes are rock-hard, they won't stick to each other anymore and you can move them to a zip-top bag. I do this with the tofu I add to tomato sauce and it works wonderfully.

The funny part is, that's exactly what I did, and I thought I froze them individually long enough-- they seemed pretty hard-- but after I put them together in a bag, they were still congealed into an icy mass when I took them out a few weeks later-- and I don't have a big frost problem in my freezer.
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#14 Old 12-07-2005, 01:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baypuppy View Post

i eat a 90% of my tofu after i freeze it. it's less like eating hot jello then (as a friend noted). you could also bake it, i hear it will stay in the fridge a bit that way too.



Thats the texture I hate described perfectly. Hot Jello! BLECH!
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#15 Old 12-07-2005, 01:51 PM
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Thawed frozen tofu soaks up more marinades also like it was said above its very porous. At least if you dont like it its only half a block
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#16 Old 12-07-2005, 02:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baypuppy View Post

i eat a 90% of my tofu after i freeze it. it's less like eating hot jello then (as a friend noted). you could also bake it, i hear it will stay in the fridge a bit that way too.



I do that a lot (freezing fried tofu), and it works very well. I didn't note any large changes in texture though. But the tofu is never jello-like, so maybe it's a firmer kind?
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#17 Old 12-07-2005, 05:06 PM
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Ive never tried freezing already cook tofu..... I may have to try that
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#18 Old 12-07-2005, 05:14 PM
 
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We do it because it is convenient, we frie a lot of cubes at the same time, and then freeze them into smaller portions. It saves time, and also money, because we can buy 'fresh' tofu (not packed in plastics, and you can't keep it long) very cheap at a local asian food store.
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#19 Old 12-07-2005, 11:35 PM
 
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OK... so someone describe this freezing tofu process to me..



pressing? Do I just take the bottom of a pan or something a push down on it? (I don't know why but this seems like an insane idea to me)



cubing.. ok i know what that is



freezing.. i know what that is.. how long should i freeze it?



marinade? do i wait until its thawed then put in it marinade?
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#20 Old 12-07-2005, 11:47 PM
 
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Standard tofu procedure:



Drain- dump out the water in the container.



Press- place the block on several layers of paper towels on a plate. Put more paper towels on top, another plate, and any handy heavy item. A couple of cans of vegetables or a skillet will do. Leave it there anywhere from 15 minutes to a couple hours, checking it occasionally and changing out the towels if they're completely soaked through. I always follow this procedure unless I'm using silken tofu in a blended application such as a dip or dressing. If you plan to press tofu often, I'd recommend going to cloth towels, because it uses up an unconscionable amount of paper towels.



Freeze- you can freeze it just until thoroughly frozen, but I'm not sure how long that takes with a whole block, so I'd recommend overnight. You can also just store it in the freezer as long as you want until you're ready to use it, following ordinary precautions against freezer burn. When it freezes, it will turn a light beige-brown color. Don't worry, it's fine.



I'd thaw before marinating. I don't think it'll soak up much while frozen.



I found this out the hard way-- If you want to glaze your tofu rather than marinate it, don't use frozen tofu. Frozen/thawed tofu is like a sponge-- it WILL soak up any liquid you put on it, so a glaze won't stay properly on the surface.
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#21 Old 12-08-2005, 11:58 AM
 
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never freezed tofu before, does it take a while to defrost, i assume you cant cook it from frozen?
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#22 Old 12-08-2005, 12:47 PM
 
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For what it's worth, I have never "presssed" tofu before freezing. I just buy it, stick the tub in the freezer, liquid and all...(or like inie said, buy it fresh/bulk from an asian market).



You can thaw under running water if it's stilll in the tub/package from the supermarket - or in the evil microwave, or put it in the fridge for over night... then when it's thawed I squeeze the heck out of it, just with my hands works the easiest...
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#23 Old 12-08-2005, 11:20 PM
 
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No, you can't cook it straight from frozen unless you want a lot of liquid to be in it (that's Ok for smoothies...I just treat my frozen soft silken tofu like ice cubes).



I usually freeze extra-firm nonsilken tofu (the kind I use for stir-fries and and other main dishes) by cutting the blocks into 1/4-inch thick peices and then wrapping them in wax paper so that there's a sheet of wax paper between every layer of tofu. That keeps it from sticking together.



When I get it out, I use my nuker's defrost setting, then press the water out with my hands between paper (or clean cloth) towels until it's almost-dry to the touch. That way I don't have to wait for it to thaw or press...I can get cooking!
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#24 Old 12-10-2005, 08:57 AM
 
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Just to add to what everyone else has already said ... you can freeze regular water-packed tofu no problem, but don't try to freeze asceptic-packed silken tofu. It thaws all watery and mushy. Blech.
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#25 Old 12-10-2005, 08:53 PM
 
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Actually, you can freeze silken tofu (the aseptic pack stuff).....



but only if you turn it into [tofu] icecream first.
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#26 Old 12-11-2005, 08:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4EverGrounded View Post

Actually, you can freeze silken tofu (the aseptic pack stuff).....



but only if you turn it into [tofu] icecream first.



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